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1961 - 1980 of 1997 Posts

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That would be great Tommy, look forward to hearing back from you.


I'll have to find the mfr of mine. I've got a hoss one in the living room. You mount your cable box and player on the back of the mount, behind the tv. All remotes work.
 

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That would be great Tommy, look forward to hearing back from you.
I looked for you. Put a flash light all over it. I'm gonna have to try and find the receipt. If you want to pm me, I can at least take some pics for you tomorrow and email them. I'm very good at keeping documentation, but very bad about where it is put so I'll have to do some digging.
 

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Thank you Tommy. Value and Appreciate your Time.

I looked for you. Put a flash light all over it. I'm gonna have to try and find the receipt. If you want to pm me, I can at least take some pics for you tomorrow and email them. I'm very good at keeping documentation, but very bad about where it is put so I'll have to do some digging.
 

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I have a 60" LG Plasma TV. Can you guys recommend a good wall mount that tilts and swivels? Also, how can I best mount my comcast and DVD player? Does the comcast box need to be visible for the remote to work? I do like being able to see the time display on the comcast box. Looking forward to your replies. Thanks.
I'm guessing the thing is a beast and weighs 100lbs. or more. I never recommend for anyone to buy a mount at a big box store. They ALWAYS mark up the prices on them to ridiculous levels. I buy all of my mounts on Amazon. They're much less expensive and are of good quality. For your TV, if you don't know the bolt pattern on the rear of it, simply measure between the holes. The measurement will be in mm. Most larger TV's are either 400x200 or 400x400. Find a mount that handles your specific mounting pattern. Also, because of the weight of the TV, I would highly recommend getting one that utilizes at least two studs for mounting. For your 60", you might even been able to use three.

Depending on the size of your Comcast box, you could attempt to place it on the wall behind the TV. If the box has an IR input, you can use an infrared receiver to handle the commands from the remote. However, because you have a DVD player as well, I would recommend a small shelf directly under the TV. You could place your DVD and cable box next to each other and neatly arrange all the cabling behind the TV.

Where exactly would you be mounting the TV? Is there a fireplace or any furniture under it?
 

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In the spirit of keeping one of the longest and oldest threads on here alive...

If you're curious what the largest TV is that will lay flat in a G2 Ridgeline, it's a 65". The box is just under 61", so it wouldn't quite fit in the bed of a G1. Owners of a G1 may be limited to a 60" model. ;)

I picked up $1,500 2017 Sony XBR65X900E to replace my $2,000 2012 Sony KDL-55HX750.

I was never really happy with the 2012's 55" size even though it was 13" larger and had better black levels than the old 42" LG it replaced.

I've been waiting for an OLED, but the prices are still high and image retention is a sore spot for me.

Let me tell ya... LCDs ("LEDs") have come a LONG ways in the last few years. I'm very impressed with the picture quality and black levels of this 2017 - especially for the price - to the point where I no longer want an OLED. The full-array local dimming really makes a difference.

I think I'm going to give the 55" to my parents to replace a 46" I bought them a few years ago. I already have a 46" in the master suite and it's plenty big, so I have no use for the 55".
 

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Nice TV... I’m still rocking a 65” Panasonic plasma from 2011, but I have 3 reasons to upgrade: 4K, HDR, and 75/77” OLED. The PQ on the plasma is still excellent, so I’m probably still a year or 2 away from upgrading, as the technology matures and prices come down. I’ve been to the Las Vegas CES, so I’ve seen what OLED is capable of and it’s clearly the future of TV technology, but without the availability of much 4K content, or the ability of broadband to reliably stream at 4K, I can be patient and wait a year or so longer. Besides, the LG’s in the 77” size are still near $10k, but they were $15k this time last year!
 

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I still have room to grow - the space where my TV is will accommodate up to an 85" screen, but the 65" looks "just right" for now since it's the same width as the "TV stand" below it.

I watched Grand Tour in 4K HDR on Amazon last night. Wow. From my primary viewing position about 10 feet away, I couldn't tell the difference between 4K and 1080p and could barely tell the difference between 1080p and 720p unless there was tiny text on the screen. I have 20/20 vision. So, 4K doesn't do anything for me on a 65" screen at 10 feet, but the HDR most certainly adds a completely new dimension. Blacks appeared to be completely void of light while snow scenes were uncomfortably bright in a dark room.

Like automobiles, I've noticed each generation of television becoming increasingly complex to the point that the average consumer will never use it properly or utilize its full capability. I know too many people who brag about their 4K TVs only to find they're left in "torch mode" and connected to a DVD player. Ignorance is bliss. :)

As with most TVs, it was too bright and blue out of the box, so I turned off all the "enhancements" and performed a quick calibration. I'll do a more thorough calibration later.

Being an LCD, the contrast and brightness decrease when viewed off-angle, but it's much better than my 2012 in this regard. When viewed within a narrow angle, I simply can't justify paying twice as much for an OLED. This X900E is impressive - especially for the price.
 

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I don't know if you caught Consumers Reports on the tv issue recently or not but they listed that X900 as one that was very good. Looks like a winner to me. I'm waiting for the OLED's to get cheaper. They say that they will be so I'm waiting. And I just saw a 8K set listed on a forum!

Steve
 

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CES rumor has it LG is trying to bring they’re C-series to market this year in the 77” and might break $5k by the end of the year as prices fall....that is, if they’re are any left by Dec. 2018

https://www.cnet.com/news/lg-oled-tvs-dont-mess-with-success-in-2018/

LG hasn’t been able to make enough 77” OLEDs to keep up with high-end demand and probably won’t until they fabricate a 10.5g manufacturing facility..in China?
 

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Our main screens are 2014 model Samsungs. The "big" tv downstairs is a 65" 4K 8-series. It was $2200 at the time and was greatly on sale. Now, a similar 8-series has HDR and several other features - currently on sale at BB for $1299.99. *Gut punch. The one we watch 90% of the time is a 55" 7-series non 4K. This TV is phenomenal and, honestly, I think yields a better 1080i/p resolution picture quality than the 8-series. No matter how much I play with the calibration of the 8-series, the black levels simply aren't as deep as I'd like them to be. It's not entirely noticeable until the room is completely dark and a darker scene shows, but it's annoying. Local dimming and HDR weren't available when I bought it, but it would REALLY benefit from having them. Actual 4K content is pretty impressive on it, so I can't complain all that much. Nonetheless, I'll get several more years of use out of it until I can convince the wife to let me buy a 75"+ 4K OLED. I'm building a new entertainment wall full of cabinets from scratch this spring and I'll be conveniently allowing enough space to fit a TV of that size (without specifically mentioning it to the wife).

I'm not an early adopter of anything. I let all the bugs get worked out of newer technology before I jump in. By the time I can justify the cost in my mind for a new large TV, OLED will be the norm with all the shortcomings worked out and will be way more affordable.
 

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I still have a Sony 40" lcd from 2008 and a 2012 60" Samsung plasma. I love the plasma for football but the Sony is no slouch. I don't watch movies, oh occasionally an old movie, but I really can't stomach anything new out of hollywood. I expect to get a minimum of 15 years of use before buying new and selling used tv's is almost like giving them away.
 

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The first flat screen I ever had was a 2006 Philips 32" LCD. It was $1000 back then. I owned a 2008 Samsung 50" plasma for many years and loved it. My brother in law actually still has it and uses it as his main TV. I always wanted a Pioneer Elite plasma, but the cost kept me away from one. Likewise, I almost jumped on buying one of the last Panasonic plasmas before they went out of production a few years back. I just couldn't justify the cost, weight and power consumption when there were 4K LED-LCD's available that were a bit larger for roughly the same price. Nonetheless, it's taken LCD/OLED technology many years to catch up to the black levels that a great plasma was able to produce over 10 years ago. I fully believe OLED will make regular LCD seem like a CRT in the next few years. I will have a 75"+ OLED at some point, I'm sure. I want to go from being impressed with my current 4K LED-LCD to saying "holy s**t!" every time I press the power button.
 

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Speaking of 4K, I was at the Xfinity store over the weekend helping my parents get some new equipment. The guy at the store gave them one of Comcast/Xfinity's new X1 platform 4k DVR boxes that just became available within the last week or so. It's tiny and is apparently much more capable than any other cable box currently available. I was told that the Super Bowl was the first thing that Xfinity has ever actually broadcast live in 4K. When I asked how this was possible as the box still had its signal delivered through regular coaxial cable, he couldn't give me a technically sound answer. Anyone have any experience with this new box? I have an X1 DVR at home and use a Roku stick with the Xfinity Stream ap on the remainder of my TV's.
 

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I'll give you the standard answer to all video over cable. It's compressed. How compressed is the big question and one that I doubt any sales droid knows the answer to.
Compressed video is standard on all cable companies. That's why over the air digital tv is still far ahead of the game for uncompressed video and higher quality transmissions. And why Blue ray in 4k gives such a great picture. Compression is your enemy. Cable delivers it.

Steve
 

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Yes, I am fully aware of cable company video compression. Fios was the worst with it. I was supposedly getting 1080p resolution on certain stations, but could see artifacts, jumping, sharp color separation, etc. No matter how much I calibrated the TV, I could never get to a level of picture quality that satisfied me. The Xfinity/Comcast service does seem to be a bit better, but it still doesn't quite reach the quality I think it should for the price paid. With services like Hulu, Netflix, Prime Video, DirecTVnow and others that offer not only great content but also access to some true 1080p and 4K content, cable companies will have to adapt or die off.
 

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Just as a note, we replaced our 2014 7-series 55" Samsung with a the 2017 model 6-series 58" 4K w/HDR set last month. I absolutely loved the older 55". The picture quality, after calibration, was quite good. However, the smart system started to lag and we were looking to get my father-in-law a newer, larger TV anyways. So, we gave the 55" to him and picked up the new one.

All I can say is wow. Even with it being a model lower than what the older one was, this TV knocks it out of the park as far as contrast, black level, detail, motion and clarity. With the same exact sources feeding it, it's pretty obvious how far TV technology advanced in just three model years. The greatest thing? The new set was $530. The old 55" was over $1000. Pretty astounding. "We" are usually watching "Coco" or "Sing" since my son is almost 2, but I do get the occasional movie or sporting event on it. My personal favorite is watching Planet Earth in 4K.
 

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Have you looked at the QLED or OLED 4k TVs Costco is selling these days? (~$3k). Pretty pricey, but stunning. Do they only shine on Blu-Ray sources or other 4k sources?
 

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A note about compression - any digital video you have ever seen is compressed. Even a $50,000 RED camera uses compression. It is the amount of compression and the codec that is determining the quality you see on your set.

Broadcast digital video had to fit within the existing 6MHz channels on the VHF/UHF band and at the time 64QAM gave about 38Mbps within that bandwidth. Most broadcast channels (i.e. over the air) used a full 18Mbps MPEG2 for their HD channel and used the rest for their .2, .3 channels at standard definition. They simply didn't need to 'pack it in'

Initially cable systems were 2:1, meaning 2 HD channels in that 6Mhz. But they had access to a lot of HD programming all at once and needed to fit it between all of the analog channels they still carried. So some went to 3:1 or even 4:1 compression. Meaning that 18mbps (that was already compressed in a lossy MPEG2) was cut to 12 or even 9Mbps MPEG2. That is why at the time off-the-air looked better. Over the years MPEG2 compression has gotten ALOT more efficient - 3:1 or even 4:1 doesn't look nearly as bad as it did. As analog channels were eliminated, that freed up space, although most of that went to more broadband (internet) capacity instead of moving back to 2:1.

That is sort of moot anyway, H264/H265 is much more efficient and can produce better picture quality at the same bitrate. Your typical 4k HDR stream from Netflix is about 15Mbps (although they recommend 25Mbps for overhead and buffering). And it isn't constrained by an arbitrary 'fit in an analog channel' data rate. As cable companies transition from legacy video to all IP based the quality is going to come up there too.
 

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Have you looked at the QLED or OLED 4k TVs Costco is selling these days? (~$3k). Pretty pricey, but stunning. Do they only shine on Blu-Ray sources or other 4k sources?
They will look their best with 4k HDR sources, but most have very good internal processing that will make even standard SD look acceptable (from a distance of course).
 

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Have you looked at the QLED or OLED 4k TVs Costco is selling these days? (~$3k). Pretty pricey, but stunning. Do they only shine on Blu-Ray sources or other 4k sources?
I've most certainly been following the technology and have seen them in person. Yes, they are stunning in general and are basically in a battle for TV technology supremacy right now. Each have their pros and cons, but they are light years ahead of typical LED-LCD technology of even 5 years ago. My 65" 2014 8-series 4K in my game room is still performing well for me, but the blacks and backlighting on it pale in comparison to newer sets. A QLED or OLED would blow it out of the water in nearly every category and can now be had for approximately the same price as what I paid for mine. Even plain old cable company high def looks quite good on one of these things. True streaming 4K signals are mind boggling. Of course, all of these new sets have absurdly overdone colors and contrast in the stores for the "wow factor", but a properly calibrated one is simply stunning.

My next purchase will be a 75" 4K with HDR likely a few years from now. I was really hoping Samsung was going to stick with OLED, but they've gone full-bore into their own QLED quantum dot technology. When I get serious about buying such a large, expensive TV, I'll do the necessary research into everything and if I stick with my love affair with Samsung products or I jump to the OLED craze with an LG or Sony. Time will tell.
 
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