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Acura announced the 2021 TLX today. So, what could that mean for the Ridgeline?

The standard powertrain in the 2021 TLX will be the 2.0T/10-speed/SH-AWD that is currently used in the RDX. The TLX Type S will use a 3.0T V6 engine that develops a "more than 50-percent increase in low-end torque compared to the outgoing, naturally aspirated 3.5-liter V6" which developed a 267 lb-ft. That means the 3.0T will produce over 400 lb.-ft. of torque which the 10-speed will need to handle since it "takes full advantage of both turbocharged engines' high-torque output".

The takeaway is that the 10-speed may be getting close to the Pilot, Ridgeline, and Passport now that there is a version that can handle more than the 280 lb-ft. of torque currently produced by the 2.0T in the RDX and bolts up to a V6 in an AWD application.

Honda still maintains that the 3.0T engine is exclusive to Acura, but there's nothing stopping them from changing their minds at any point.
 

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I can see it now, you can get an MDX with the twin turbo for 65k in a few years or a Pilot/Passport for 35k . Does Honda need another Halo car while they continue to be in the middle of the pack? Meanwhile, I can get 400ft. lbs of torque in an F-150 for 35k and have 50 to pick from at any Ford dealer.all day long. I'm guessing the 3.5 will be history. Honda's got a lot riding on the next Pilot will they get it right? Other than SH-AWD time to ditch everything else. No more timing belts no more VCM and build cars that can not have a 2k uncovered repair inside of the 5-60. I did read something yesterday that Honda hasn't completely given up on the DCT.
 

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I can see it now, you can get an MDX with the twin turbo for 65k in a few years or a Pilot/Passport for 35k . Does Honda need another Halo car while they continue to be in the middle of the pack? Meanwhile, I can get 400ft. lbs of torque in an F-150 for 35k and have 50 to pick from at any Ford dealer.all day long. I'm guessing the 3.5 will be history. Honda's got a lot riding on the next Pilot will they get it right? Other than SH-AWD time to ditch everything else. No more timing belts no more VCM and build cars that can not have a 2k uncovered repair inside of the 5-60. I did read something yesterday that Honda hasn't completely given up on the DCT.
At one point a few years ago, I think they (Acura) were working on a triple-clutch 11-speed trans, but I may be mis-remembering.
 

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Nice to see they increased the wheelbase and width and back to the wishbone. I bet that car will look much better in person. I would hope that the turbo V6 will have better performance numbers than a Mustang GT. Will love to see the comparison to this the Stinger and the Infinity.
 

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Nice to see they increased the wheelbase and width and back to the wishbone. I bet that car will look much better in person. I would hope that the turbo V6 will have better performance numbers than a Mustang GT. Will love to see the comparison to this the Stinger and the Infinity.
At the end of the day, the TLX is still front-wheel drive unlike the Mustang, Stinger, and Q. There's nothing wrong with rail-like handling, but it's always fun to steer with the accelerator pedal! :) I'm really looking forward to RWD 2023 Mazda6 with the inline-6 - that's a recipe for old-school BMW handling with Japanese reliability.
 

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I can see it now, you can get an MDX with the twin turbo for 65k in a few years or a Pilot/Passport for 35k . Does Honda need another Halo car while they continue to be in the middle of the pack? Meanwhile, I can get 400ft. lbs of torque in an F-150 for 35k and have 50 to pick from at any Ford dealer.all day long. I'm guessing the 3.5 will be history. Honda's got a lot riding on the next Pilot will they get it right? Other than SH-AWD time to ditch everything else. No more timing belts no more VCM and build cars that can not have a 2k uncovered repair inside of the 5-60. I did read something yesterday that Honda hasn't completely given up on the DCT.
I'm with you on the VCM issue. But I'm on the fence regarding timing chains vs timing belts. They both wear out and need to be replaced over time.
 

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I'm with you on the VCM issue. But I'm on the fence regarding timing chains vs timing belts. They both wear out and need to be replaced over time.
For a low mileage driver like me, I hate to have to undertake a timing belt job due to time and while having low miles. That wouldn't be necessary with a chain so in my mind advantage chain.

@zroger73, I was thinking AWD would be an equalizer considering what Honda could do with the Civic TYPE R but something is nice about a longitudinal setup especially with a straight 6.

Really though the excellent one would probably be the 4 banger with AWD.
 

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Honda still maintains that the 3.0T engine is exclusive to Acura, but there's nothing stopping them from changing their minds at any point.
I thought it was mentioned that the V6 is a DOHC in Sofyan Bey/Redline Reviews's video. Which would mean that it is the 75deg engine, similar to the NSX and not the 60deg as the J series. Which does makes sense since the hood is long (dash to axle ratio) and the engine bay is wide. This also means that it would not see inside of a vehicle with a Honda badge.
 

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For a low mileage driver like me, I hate to have to undertake a timing belt job due to time and while having low miles. That wouldn't be necessary with a chain so in my mind advantage chain.

@zroger73, I was thinking AWD would be an equalizer considering what Honda could do with the Civic TYPE R but something is nice about a longitudinal setup especially with a straight 6.

Really though the excellent one would probably be the 4 banger with AWD.
Good point. But to the best of my knowledge, there is no time in service issue on the timing belt. That old 7 year thing came from old maintenance schedules that tend to be much more conservative than the MM.

I let my 2008 Ridgeline TB go until I hit 120k miles and was about 12 years old. I couldn't tell the used one from a new one. But I think that falls into the category of comfort zones too... and some people may just be uncomfy with extending TB change intervals beyond what they're used to.

In that vein, I talked to a guy yesterday who still does 3000 mile OCIs. Shrug.
 
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Acura announced the 2021 TLX today. So, what could that mean for the Ridgeline?

The standard powertrain in the 2021 TLX will be the 2.0T/10-speed/SH-AWD that is currently used in the RDX. The TLX Type S will use a 3.0T V6 engine that develops a "more than 50-percent increase in low-end torque compared to the outgoing, naturally aspirated 3.5-liter V6" which developed a 267 lb-ft. That means the 3.0T will produce over 400 lb.-ft. of torque which the 10-speed will need to handle since it "takes full advantage of both turbocharged engines' high-torque output".

The takeaway is that the 10-speed may be getting close to the Pilot, Ridgeline, and Passport now that there is a version that can handle more than the 280 lb-ft. of torque currently produced by the 2.0T in the RDX and bolts up to a V6 in an AWD application.

Honda still maintains that the 3.0T engine is exclusive to Acura, but there's nothing stopping them from changing their minds at any point.
@zroger73,

I'm sure you saw this, does that mean the 4th gen SH-AWD would be closer to rear wheel drive vs front wheel drive? Says rear-biased, not sure how that compares to the RL which I believe is front biased?

Superior handling capabilities are now offered on all TLX models with the available rear-biased Super Handling All-Wheel Drive™ (SH-AWD®), Acura's industry-leading torque-vectoring all-wheel drive technology. SH-AWD is offered as optional equipment on the 2.0-liter TLX and as standard technology on the TLX Type S, the first Type S model to feature all-wheel drive.

Acura's 4th-generation SH-AWD® system has 40 percent more rear torque capacity and 30 percent quicker front-to-rear torque transfer than the 3rd-generation system in the outgoing TLX. The Acura SH-AWD® system in the new TLX transfers up to 70 percent of engine torque to the rear axle during normal driving conditions, while continuously apportioning up to 100 percent of that rear-axle torque between either the left and right rear wheels. Additionally, the rear axle is continuously overdriven by 2.9 percent, which amplifies the yaw moment effect of left-to-right torque transfer, elevating performance through sharper and more accurate turn-in, and improved traceability when cornering.
 

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@zroger73,

I'm sure you saw this, does that mean the 4th gen SH-AWD would be closer to rear wheel drive vs front wheel drive? Says rear-biased, not sure how that compares to the RL which I believe is front biased?
SH-AWD typically sends more power to the rear under more conditions than iVTM-4, but you can't remove power from the front and send it to the rear ("transfer"). By default, the TLX is still a front-wheel drive vehicle with the rear wheels helping and not "taking the place of" the front wheels. They're always being driven because they're directly connected to the transmission and not through a clutch. So, the front wheels always receive 100% of available torque. The rear wheels can receive up to 70% of available torque. This is in contrast to something like an AWD Kia Stinger that is fundamentally a rear-wheel drive vehicle that always drives the rear wheels and uses the front wheels to assist.

The term "transfer" is often used incorrectly when describing AWD systems. Transfer means "move from one place to another". You cannot move power from the front to the rear of the TLX unless you had a way to disconnect the front axle such as with another set of clutches and that would be counter-productive. Ideally, all wheels should be fully powered in order for a vehicle to make the most progress, but that can't happen on paved roads because mechanical windup (and damage) would occur.
 

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SH-AWD typically sends more power to the rear under more conditions than iVTM-4, but you can't remove power from the front and send it to the rear ("transfer"). By default, the TLX is still a front-wheel drive vehicle with the rear wheels helping and not "taking the place of" the front wheels. You can't remove power from the front wheels - they're always pulling because they're directly connected to the transmission and not through a clutch. So, the front wheels always receive 100% of available torque. The rear wheels can receive up to 70% of available torque. This is in contrast to something like an AWD Kia Stinger that is fundamentally a rear-wheel drive vehicle that always drives the rear wheels and uses the front wheels to assist.

The term "transfer" is often used incorrectly when describing AWD systems. Transfer means "move from one place to another". You cannot move power from the front to the rear of the TLX unless you had a way to disconnect the front axle such as with another set of clutches and that would be counter-productive. Ideally, all wheels should be fully powered in order for a vehicle to make the most progress, but that can't happen on paved roads because mechanical windup (and damage) would occur.
Thanks for the response zroger figured you'd be the person to ask.
 

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Also to note is the current Generation Ridgeline, Pilot and Passport all have the same rear differential and share that with the current gen TLX and MDX. The biggest difference is the programming among them. When the driving test between the Pilot and MDX was performed (not sure which YouTube channel it was), the MDX was more eager to swing its rear out than the Pilot, under same driving pattern & condition.

I anticipate that the rear differential on the upcoming TLX platform could essentially inherit the current generation RDX's with different programming.
 

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Also to note is the current Generation Ridgeline, Pilot and Passport all have the same rear differential and share that with the current gen TLX and MDX. The biggest difference is the programming among them.

I anticipate that the rear differential on the upcoming TLX platform could essentially inherit the current generation RDX's with different programming.
That is correct. The 2021 TLX will have the 4th generation SH-AWD that is currently used only on the 2019-2020 RDX. It has a 2.9% overdrive vs. 2.7% on other models with SH-AWD and iVTM-4.
 
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