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With the ranger coming, wonder how big this will really be - maybe like a Subaru baja, or an older s-10. Will be interesting to see more.
 

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Looks Very "Baja" like.



 

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Looks Very "Baja" like.



I see a lot of these in Latin America markets, like Mexico and Brazil. Easy to maneuver around tight city streets and lots of traffic...Last trip to Sao Paulo, I saw Audi, Chevy, VW, Ford models like this.
 
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Hmmm...I don't see much of a US market for a new unibody Courier, especially a two-seat regular cab version as pictured, but what do I know? I guess if Hyundai builds the Santa Cruz first (which is more versatile and much better looking, IMO), we'll see what the demand is. Many industry analysts are saying that new and upcoming generations of drivers, especially in more urban areas, aren't even interested in owning a vehicle. They prefer ride-sharing, renting from a pool or calling an Uber. Of course, that doesn't work so well for the outdoorsy gang -- they are gravitating toward the HR-V, Crosstrek, Ecosport and other small crossover SUVs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hmmm...I don't see much of a US market for a new unibody Courier, especially a two-seat regular cab version as pictured, but what do I know? I guess if Hyundai builds the Santa Cruz first (which is more versatile and much better looking, IMO), we'll see what the demand is. Many industry analysts are saying that new and upcoming generations of drivers, especially in more urban areas, aren't even interested in owning a vehicle. They prefer ride-sharing, renting from a pool or calling an Uber. Of course, that doesn't work so well for the outdoorsy gang -- they are gravitating toward the HR-V, Crosstrek, Ecosport and other small crossover SUVs.
IF they can keep cost down and maximize utility, i can see it being the new standard for small contractors (like pool service) and some fleets (pest control operators).

Honda should do it with something like the HRV, but make it FWD-only to maximize rear bed space, with low floor height and low reach-over height, maybe a shelf and tonneau option for the bed - "magic shelf".
 

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Many industry analysts are saying that new and upcoming generations of drivers, especially in more urban areas, aren't even interested in owning a vehicle. They prefer ride-sharing, renting from a pool or calling an Uber.
In Seattle, for those who do live within like 5-10 miles of city center... I find that to be very much the case. Only about half my co-workers across the board own cars.. most just one car per household. Everyone under about 35 who do not live at home uses car share or rental if they even need a car for anything. With amazon prime, you can furnish your entire apartment (and fridge) same day delivered... If I did not live at home, play "farmer/homesteader" for fun, and lived in this concrete jungle, I would be with the others of my age group ubering and car sharing around town if a car was even needed (it's not). Even the outdoorsy types can rent their cars easily here and pick which car they want to rent. Even if they spend $400 a month renting a car (often splitting costs with buddies), that is less than owning a car if one has to pay for a car loan, parking, and insurance.

Car ownership is prohibitively expensive for most and is a real luxury in the city, from which people throughout history flock to for opportunity. Car share membership includes insurance and gives you all kinds of vehicle choices. My co-workers can choose a truck to move furniture or choose a nice Mercedes for the evening to go on a date a few times a month.... and spend less than I do a year for a parking pass. Many of the students that come through (college level) do not know how to drive or are just learning how to drive. Now go outside of the public transport areas by 25+ miles and we enter the zone of one car per person plus a truck per each household. But this is just the perspective of a Seattilite trapped between a city and a dream... so I'm sure different areas of the country are different.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I should have clarified, this would be for the U.S. market.

GM, FCA and others also already have unibody trucks of some sort in the global market. It takes a number of years to get those into the U.S., because they have to 1) meet emissions standards (testing/certifications), 2) meet crash test standards (more testing/certifications), 3) build a factory or re-tool existing factory in the U.S. to build those trucks (thanks to archaic and obsolete Chicken Tax), and 4) other testing, such as J2807, market acceptance, etc. There is also gearing up third-party vendors and suppliers and getting all of those contracts into place. There is nothing quick and easy about it, unlike most other countries around the globe.
 

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I've always have liked small vehicles, including trucks, as long as they were not cramped or uncomfortable inside. I've owned a Datsun pickup as well as a Ford Ranger. The Datsun had a bulletproof engine, but the bed rusted apart. The Ranger had a great Mazda engine, but everything Ford supplied stopped working or fell off the truck. I think most American drivers are too spoiled to think small these days. Even medium sized trucks are as big as full size trucks were a few years ago.

The Ridgeline is perhaps too big by my personal standards, but it has spoiled me. If there were an actual small truck on the market that does 80-90% of what the RL does and got over 30 mpg, I would have considered it (too late now). I love my RL, but certain parking lots and especially parking garages now give me agita!

P.S. The original link sure had some RL haters commenting. Thanks longboat for putting up a fight!
 

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Its a confusing rumor, with Ford getting out of the car business, to focus on trucks. Why add a unibody when the won't have a platform to draw from?
 

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Its a confusing rumor, with Ford getting out of the car business, to focus on trucks. Why add a unibody when the won't have a platform to draw from?
Maybe they have a plant or two that really isn't setup for building body-on-frame vehicles? This unibody truck would be based on the Focus. It would also help if they already have binding contracts with the same vendors.
 

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Seen the current ranger and it's plenty big enough for the US market.
Unibody pick ups are generally smaller fiesta sized rather than RL sized.
 

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Re: Ford Courier Comeback?

Aw so cute!
 

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Re: Ford Courier Comeback?

This will only support the unibody perspective thus providing more credibility for the Ridgeline. IMO it's more of a violation to offer only a 4 banger in a midsize truck than to have a unibody. The new Ranger is a different animal than the old Ranger who's owners have sticker shock when looking at the new Ranger. This is obviously a more affordable option and could play into the argument of "how much truck do people need."
 
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