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I better see all the Gomers out there that have been bashing the Ridgeline for not being a " real truck" do the same to this new rig. Unibody take off on the baby Bronco (which is just a Ford Edge or Escape). FWD etc. I guess because its a Ford the bashing will be less...

I'm still bummed Mazda did not take this leap
 

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LOL it's literally a mini ridgeline, they didn't even try to make it that much better

I bet they sell like crazy anyway
 

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My hopes are that the Mav and the SC push Honda to improve the RL. I’d really like to see a hybrid option for the RL.

I don’t think the SC has enough bed space and I wouldn’t want to give up the RL trunk or tailgate by going to these 2 new competitors


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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I think Ford mentioned 37mpg combined, so some are guessing that Hwy will be 33mpg.
The Escape Hybrid FWD, which shares a similar hybrid powertrain and weighs about 200 lbs. more than the Maverick, is rated at 44 city, 37 highway, and 41 combined.

If we scale these numbers to the Maverick, that would be about 33.6 highway which agrees.

LOL it's literally a mini ridgeline, they didn't even try to make it that much better
The Santa Cruz is more of a "mini Ridgeline"- at least it has a composite bed and trunklet unlike the Maverick.

The Maverick's outstanding qualities are its fuel economy and low price - it lacks three of the major elements that make the Ridgeline unique: The bed, the trunk, and the tailgate.
 

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Life goes full circle. I remember reading an article back in the day (early 90's) about getting an 8k Tacoma or a Corolla. Low prices open up all sorts of possibilities.

 

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The Escape Hybrid FWD, which shares a similar hybrid powertrain and weighs about 200 lbs. more than the Maverick, is rated at 44 city, 37 highway, and 41 combined.

If we scale these numbers to the Maverick, that would be about 33.6 highway which agrees.



The Santa Cruz is more of a "mini Ridgeline"- at least it has a composite bed and trunklet unlike the Maverick.

The Maverick's outstanding qualities are its fuel economy and low price - it lacks three of the major elements that make the Ridgeline unique: The bed, the trunk, and the tailgate.
I would like to see some of the Maverick bed's board slots in a future Ridgeline bed, as long as they don't take away from useful width.
 

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And the Ford Escape is one of the worst vehicles made as far as reliability apart from the hybrid drivetrain. I fear the Maverick will follow suit.
View attachment 414243
Oddly enough, I've owned two Escapes. Granted, both of mine were the 2.5L naturally aspirated engine so I didn't have to deal with the issues of the turbo engine. Both of mine were 2014 models. Both of them had the throttle position sensor go out within a week of each other. Replaced under warranty as I waited...a $20 part. No big deal. One of them had the transmission fail at 25,000 miles. Covered under warranty and I was provided a loaner car (more than Honda has ever done). That particular Escape now has 97,000 miles and had not returned to the shop since the transmission replacement. I've passed it down to my daughter and plan on it getting her through high school and college. Last UOA showed the engine is still healthy with no wear metals or fuel dilution.

With my Ridgeline that is less than one month old with 1200 miles on it....the dealer is refusing to fix the stiff brake pedal issue saying it's "normal" (my 2019 didn't exhibit the behavior) and they refuse to even acknowledge or duplicate the issue of the truck lunging forward on startup. I've had to spend $50 to purchase the part I believe will fix the brake pedal problem, as well as a quart of Honda brake fluid to bleed the brakes just for good measure. Then there is the fact that I have to do the labor. That should not ever have to be the case when you spend your hard earned money on a new vehicle.

Right now, my experience with Ford has been FAR better than my experience with Honda. If something goes wrong with my Honda, I'm not 100% sure they will stand behind the product and fix it. I know Ford will. They have always treated me very well. I've owned three Explorers, two F-150's, a Fusion, a Fiesta, and two Escapes. The dual clutch in the Fiesta was junk, but it was a lease car and we didn't really have to worry about the long term reliability of it. But it ended up having two trips to the service department to correct issues. All three of my Explorers went over 100,000 miles trouble free. The F-150's were trouble free too as was the Fusion (a rare manual model).
 

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I would like to see some of the Maverick bed's board slots in a future Ridgeline bed, as long as they don't take away from useful width.
Yes - my BIL's F150 has a board slot that keeps objects from sliding, while I have to utilize creative bunjeeing techniques in my RL bed. Weird how the bed/trunk/tailgate was obviously so well designed...and yet no board slot.
 

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“Not a real truck” crowd should be pleased there’s another “fake” truck on the market to complain about. I suspect Ford will get a small pass since they are the leading truck manufacturer.

I’ve always suspected more trucks will be unibody trucks in the mid to small truck class. Now there are 3.

I think they should go single cab, with enough space behind the seat so you can tilt the seat back a little and/or throw a couple tool bags behind the seat. Make the bed 6.5", nearly 8' with tailgate down.

They could offer accessory bins, shelves or hooks that could attach to the cab behind the seat. The fleet and work guys would eat it up.
An extra cab at a minimum.
 

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I've never understood all the criticism towards the Ridgeline. Is a Ford Taurus not a "real car" because it doesn't have a V8 engine, body-on-frame construction, and rear-wheel drive like a Crown Victoria? Is a Ford Flex not a "real SUV" because it doesn't have a V8 engine, body-on-frame construction, and rear-wheel drive like an Expedition? There are many different sizes and capabilities of vehicles within each category for different needs. Unibody vehicles with open beds like the Ridgeline, Santa Cruz, and Maverick are simply different size trucks that are better suited for the actual needs of many "real truck" buyers. Although the Maverick is a unibody vehicle with an open bed like the Ridgeline, it still lacks most of the features that set the Ridgeline apart such as the composite bed, trunk, dual-hinged tailgate, and torque-vectoring all-wheel drive system. Neither the Santa Cruz nor the Maverick can compete with the Ridgeline when it comes to the bed dimensions - when you're dealing with relatively small beds to begin with, that extra foot makes a HUGE difference. Still, I hope that Santa Cruz and Maverick succeed in the unibody, open-bed category in hopes that this will give Honda some initiative to improve the Ridgeline.
 

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I worked at gas stations for years and the funniest moment was a guy came in to put cash on a pump, tells me the pump number, I look outside to verify his vehicle, he drove a 90s chevy single cab 1500
I ask "is it the small white truck?"
He replies: "it's not small it's full sized"
Me: "Oh"

Ever since that encounter I have wanted a small or midsized truck
 

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I hope the SC and Maverick both succeed, also, as that will go a long way toward improving market acceptance of these types of trucks. If they fail, we may never see small trucks again. Mfrs aren't going to build small body-on-frame trucks like the original Ranger and S-10 again, so they will either be unibody or they won't exist.

I'd really like to see Toyota bring us a Rav4 Hybrid-based single cab, six-foot bed trucklet. I think there is room in the market for one mfr to succeed in selling a single-cab compact, but I think if more than one mfr tries to do that, neither one will sell enough and they will fail. I think a LOT of people would love to see Toyota back in the mini-truck game, regardless of body construction type.
 

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I hope the SC and Maverick both succeed, also, as that will go a long way toward improving market acceptance of these types of trucks. If they fail, we may never see small trucks again. Mfrs aren't going to build small body-on-frame trucks like the original Ranger and S-10 again, so they will either be unibody or they won't exist.

I'd really like to see Toyota bring us a Rav4 Hybrid-based single cab, six-foot bed trucklet. I think there is room in the market for one mfr to succeed in selling a single-cab compact, but I think if more than one mfr tries to do that, neither one will sell enough and they will fail. I think a LOT of people would love to see Toyota back in the mini-truck game, regardless of body construction type.
If you are talking about smaller than say the Maverick, Alex on Autos mentioned that if a manufacturer goes smaller they won't be able to meet some sort of efficiency threshold. It's a shame that there's no way to get a 6 foot bed in something smaller than a Ranger, Colorado, Frontier. Your read these Maverick comments and it always comes up why no 6 foot bed? There's got to be someone out there wiling to take the chance on that white sheet space. It would be amazing if Toyota took a swing at that but they've already got the Tacoma.
 

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If you are talking about smaller than say the Maverick, Alex on Autos mentioned that if a manufacturer goes smaller they won't be able to meet some sort of efficiency threshold. It's a shame that there's no way to get a 6 foot bed in something smaller than a Ranger, Colorado, Frontier. Your read these Maverick comments and it always comes up why no 6 foot bed? There's got to be someone out there wiling to take the chance on that white sheet space. It would be amazing if Toyota took a swing at that but they've already got the Tacoma.
It's a shame that CAFE rewards larger vehicles... it is incentive for mfrs to build larger vehicles. I'm sure EPA didn't mean for that to happen, but it's a huge loophole they need to fix.

I keep hearing rumors that mfrs are making crew cabs not because of the market, but because they get more CAFE or emissions rewards for offering a higher-occuoancy vehicle per footprint, but I haven't found proof of that yet.

Toyota can keep their bread'n'butter Tacoma, but still give is modern unibody trucklet - that would be the best of both worlds. If they want to give us a crew cab with a 6' bed, at least give us RWS* so we have a decent turning radius.

* the eternal optimist in me is hoping Honda will give us a hybrid Ridgeline with RWS based on electric motors driving the rear wheels, even if it has to be based on the Ultium.
 

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This is so interesting, it just makes me wonder what market research they're looking at. Logically you'd have to assume that someone who shops a Ranger/Tacoma and decides on a Ridgeline is the target demo? There's nothing else on the market to compare it to. Having just done that exact thing myself, the Ridgeline selling points were all of the things everyone talks about (storage, safety, AWD, ride, MPG etc.), but very near the top was the back seat leg room and width to accommodate rear facing car seats comfortably. It was a non-starter in the other mid size trucks. The Maverick doesn't do that so it wouldn't have been on my list, but maybe they're going after the younger or much older me? Would love to know who they think is going to buy this.
 

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This is so interesting, it just makes me wonder what market research they're looking at. Logically you'd have to assume that someone who shops a Ranger/Tacoma and decides on a Ridgeline is the target demo?
I actually think the target demo is people who settled on tacomas and rangers because they were convinced the RL was not a 'real' truck and they needed something bigger and more 'rugged'

Basically its a truck for city guys who don't need a full size but are scared to drive anything else, but its ford, it will probably sell really well for 2 years until everyone realizes they only last about that long

there is a joke about certain sizes in there somewhere but im too lazy to make it
 

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I suspect the target market is fleet service (e.g., Orkin, Napa), first-time truck buyers and retired folks on a tight income who feel they need a truck.

I don't see the Ridgeline demographic moving to the Maverick unless for cost reasons... that would be kinda like going from a Cadillac to a Cruze. I could more easily see some Ridgeline demographic picking up the Santra Cruz, which is decidedly more upscale than the Mav.

Edit: that CNET article posted upstream in this thread makes a good argument, also.

Here it is:
 

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The Badlands Bronco Sport has a dual-clutch AWD system (similar to the Ridgeline's) while the AWD Maverick makes do with a simpler, single-clutch system with an open rear differential like virtually every other AWD vehicle on the road.
It was unclear whether the 2.0 came with the better one from the bronco sport (Ford still uses the simpler version on the 1.5 Broncos) or the one from the Escape 2.0. Thanks for the correction
 

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I was just reviewing the specs on the Ford Maverick. Considering this truck is about 10" shorter than the Ridgeline, and so much cheaper, how can the bed have an almost identical capacity to the Ridgeline?

The Maverick has a HIGHER payload capacity, and has .73" MORE ground clearance (in AWD - The specs don't say if the off-road FX4 package will increase the ground clearance further.) And the off-road/towing packages include full skid plates, real AT tires, heavy duty fans, heavy duty radiator and heavy duty transmission cooling.

The Ecoboost 2.0 twin turbo puts out only 30 less hp than the Ridgeline's 6 while having to power a lighter, smaller vehicle.

It is already reported that the Maverick with every option tops out at $37K MSRP, almost $10K less than the Ridgeline.

You can say the Ridgeline is bigger, but the specs that define the capabilities of a truck at best match what the Maverick also offers with the notable exception of towing capacity. (but still at 4,000 lb. for the little Maverick)

It makes you wonder what the Honda engineers were doing during the 2021 redesign? It seems that the designers only did cosmetic changes for the 2021 Ridgeline. They stuck on a truck grill, leveled out the hood, and put fake notches on the all-season SUV tires to make the HPD package look "tough" without adding functionality. None of the other shortcomings of the Ridgeline were improved upon.

You can check out the specs here and compare to Honda's specs:
 

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This is like questioning why the Accord is more expensive than a Civic.

The 2021 is a mid cycle refresh. Changes will be cosmetic and minimal.

The maverick is in a lower league.
 
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