Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just replaced these on my 2006. Here are some tips to help you do the same:


Removal:

0. Get two floor jacks. 3 works even better

1. Jack up both sides of front at same time. Remove wheels and disconnect end link (sway bar to strut connector) at the top connection. (Allen key and 17mm wrench I recall). This allows for easier installation of new control arms... trust me!!! EVEN IF YOU ARE CHANGING ONLY ONE CONTROL ARM, BOTH END LINKS MUST BE DETACHED AT THEIR TOPS.

2. Pull cotter pin and remove castellated nut from ball joint.

3. Use a large pickle fork to separate the ball joint from steering knuckle. (I have a few ball joint tools for cars but nothing big enough for this truck... a big unused pickle fork did the trick).

4. Unbolt the large front and rear bolts holding control arm to frame. Front is 22mm and rear is 19mm wrench I recall.

5. Press the control arm down and man-handle the ball joint towards the back of the truck so that it is outside of the cup in the bottom of the steering knuckle.

6, Swing the control arm's front out of the front recess where the bolt went and continue to rotate it backward from the truck.

7. The control arm should now be hanging only from the recess where the rear bolt was. Pull the control arm away from the truck.

8. Repeat for other control arm if replacing two.



Installation:


1. Clean the threads and apply Grease/Antiseize the 2 bolts and into their respective holes in the control arm as well as in the recesses in the frame where the control arm will fit. Also grease/antiseize the threads on the new ball joint.

2. Insert the new control arm only in the back recess and install the shorter bolt. Just turn it ~ 4 threads. Do not tighten it. This point will now act as a pivot. IMPORTANT: Make sure the bolt is grabbing some threads, not just pinched in place. This is very important as it is nearly impossible to insert this bolt after this step.... I KNOW!!

3. Swing the control arm's front end into its recess in the frame. The new ball joint will hang-up on the sagging steering knuckle. The trick here is to man-handle the control arm's ball joint so that its threaded shaft goes up into the cup in the underside of the knuckle. Pushing down on the control arm and twisting the ball joint's threaded shaft favourably will help. A friend lifting the strut would not hurt either.

4. Push the control arm into the front recess. I had to use a hammer and long rod to drive it into position. By this time the ball joint's threaded shaft should have worked itself up into the steering knuckle and you should see the top of its threaded shaft peeking through.

5. Loosely install the castellated nut on the ball joint.

6. Install front bolt on control arm. A second floor jack under the control arm near the front bolt can help align it with the holes in the frames front recess.

7. Turn the two bolts and castellated nut so that they are just less than snug (~ 0.5mm from their final stop).

8. Repeat steps 1 to 7 for the other control arm if replacing two.

9. Use the second floor jack and place it under the new ball joint area.

10. Jack up the 2nd floor jack so that all of the load on that side of the truck is on the 2nd floor jack. (i.e. It should visually have lifted the the truck not just compressed the front strut).

11, Torque the 2 bolts and castellated nut (rear bolt 84 ft-lbs; front bolt 119 ft-lbs; castellated nut 69ft-lbs)

12. Install cotter pin in castellated nut.

13. If replacing two control arms, make sure you have completed all of the steps above for both sides before proceeding to step 14.

14. Install top end link on one side of truck (clean threads, apply grease or anti-seize then torque to 58 ft-lbs)

15. Install wheel on this side and lower it to ground.

16. On other sided, use second floor jack under control arm to raise it so that the end link can mate against its hole in the strut.

17. Install top end link (clean threads, apply grease or anti-seize then torque to 58 ft-lbs)

18. Install wheel on this side and lower it to ground.

19. Torque lug nuts.

Done!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,498 Posts
I just have a quote from my local tire and suspension shop (Les Schwab) to replace the lower control arms with balljoints and a 4 wheel alignment for $940.06.
 

·
Premium Member
2010 RT - Bali Blue
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
I just have a quote from my local tire and suspension shop (Les Schwab) to replace the lower control arms with balljoints and a 4 wheel alignment for $940.06.
Ask around more. Lower control arms and alignment should be approximately similar to axles and alignment. Parts and labor, for control arm and alignment should be around $500 or below. I am quoting that number out of NJ prices, where everything is expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I just replaced these on my 2006. Here are some tips to help you do the same:


Removal:

0. Get two floor jacks. 3 works even better

1. Jack up both sides of front at same time. Remove wheels and disconnect end link (sway bar to strut connector) at the top connection. (Allen key and 17mm wrench I recall). This allows for easier installation of new control arms... trust me!!! EVEN IF YOU ARE CHANGING ONLY ONE CONTROL ARM, BOTH END LINKS MUST BE DETACHED AT THEIR TOPS.

2. Pull cotter pin and remove castellated nut from ball joint.

3. Use a large pickle fork to separate the ball joint from steering knuckle. (I have a few ball joint tools for cars but nothing big enough for this truck... a big unused pickle fork did the trick).

4. Unbolt the large front and rear bolts holding control arm to frame. Front is 22mm and rear is 19mm wrench I recall.

5. Press the control arm down and man-handle the ball joint towards the back of the truck so that it is outside of the cup in the bottom of the steering knuckle.

6, Swing the control arm's front out of the front recess where the bolt went and continue to rotate it backward from the truck.

7. The control arm should now be hanging only from the recess where the rear bolt was. Pull the control arm away from the truck.

8. Repeat for other control arm if replacing two.



Installation:


1. Clean the threads and apply Grease/Antiseize the 2 bolts and into their respective holes in the control arm as well as in the recesses in the frame where the control arm will fit. Also grease/antiseize the threads on the new ball joint.

2. Insert the new control arm only in the back recess and install the shorter bolt. Just turn it ~ 4 threads. Do not tighten it. This point will now act as a pivot. IMPORTANT: Make sure the bolt is grabbing some threads, not just pinched in place. This is very important as it is nearly impossible to insert this bolt after this step.... I KNOW!!

3. Swing the control arm's front end into its recess in the frame. The new ball joint will hang-up on the sagging steering knuckle. The trick here is to man-handle the control arm's ball joint so that its threaded shaft goes up into the cup in the underside of the knuckle. Pushing down on the control arm and twisting the ball joint's threaded shaft favourably will help. A friend lifting the strut would not hurt either.

4. Push the control arm into the front recess. I had to use a hammer and long rod to drive it into position. By this time the ball joint's threaded shaft should have worked itself up into the steering knuckle and you should see the top of its threaded shaft peeking through.

5. Loosely install the castellated nut on the ball joint.

6. Install front bolt on control arm. A second floor jack under the control arm near the front bolt can help align it with the holes in the frames front recess.

7. Turn the two bolts and castellated nut so that they are just less than snug (~ 0.5mm from their final stop).

8. Repeat steps 1 to 7 for the other control arm if replacing two.

9. Use the second floor jack and place it under the new ball joint area.

10. Jack up the 2nd floor jack so that all of the load on that side of the truck is on the 2nd floor jack. (i.e. It should visually have lifted the the truck not just compressed the front strut).

11, Torque the 2 bolts and castellated nut (rear bolt 84 ft-lbs; front bolt 119 ft-lbs; castellated nut 69ft-lbs)

12. Install cotter pin in castellated nut.

13. If replacing two control arms, make sure you have completed all of the steps above for both sides before proceeding to step 14.

14. Install top end link on one side of truck (clean threads, apply grease or anti-seize then torque to 58 ft-lbs)

15. Install wheel on this side and lower it to ground.

16. On other sided, use second floor jack under control arm to raise it so that the end link can mate against its hole in the strut.

17. Install top end link (clean threads, apply grease or anti-seize then torque to 58 ft-lbs)

18. Install wheel on this side and lower it to ground.

19. Torque lug nuts.

Done!
Help!! I have loosened the top nut and removed it no problem but I can get my ball joint separator far enough to engage the nut to pop it. I also have three different forks and none of these work. The angle between the ball joint and assembly and the wheel spindle assembly seems off kilter. Any suggestions are welcome please chime in!!! thanks.
 

·
Registered
2014 Sport
Joined
·
3,199 Posts
Help!! I have loosened the top nut and removed it no problem but I can get my ball joint separator far enough to engage the nut to pop it. I also have three different forks and none of these work. The angle between the ball joint and assembly and the wheel spindle assembly seems off kilter. Any suggestions are welcome please chime in!!! thanks.
Maybe the type of separator this fellow used would work for you? It's shown in action early on in this video.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Maybe the type of separator this fellow used would work for you? It's shown in action early on in this video.
Thanks for the idea, yes I have seen that video and many more about the subject. The problem is, with my particular configuration, the splines if you will of the tool shown, do not reach the top of the castle nut. They arent long enough and I dont have enough clearance for the tool to properly engage with the bottom of the ball.
I guess I will have to try to find myself a wide enough and hefty enough pickle fork at Autozone or Oreilly stores today.Crossing my fingers and hoping they have one.
 

·
Premium Member
2010 RT - Bali Blue
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
@Timothy Jerome , just two weeks ago, I replaced both the front lower control arms and this is what I did.

  • unscrewed, but left the castlenut on the threads
  • used a very generous amount of Liquid Wrench and let it penetrate the balljoint.
  • Remove the front rotors to prevent damage
  • Used a 16-oz Ball Pein Hammer (Harbor Freight # 69010, 61304) and wacked the lower control arm, right where the ball joint is.
  • Used the balljoint fork (like a Harbor Freight #63420) and the joint separated.
NOTE: If you are working with jackstands, then here is a tip. Once you remove the rotor, use a floor jack and push on the hub enough to compress the suspension. Then use the fork to separate the lower control arm. When the control arm is preloaded, it is easier to get the balljoint to pop out.

Very important. If you are working with jack stands, please ensure you are fully securing your vehicle from any motion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Thank you I thought the jack under the wheel control arm would help, it does make the clearance better, I will try the hammer trick. Thanks again!
 

·
Premium Member
2010 RT - Bali Blue
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
@Timothy Jerome , Unless I misread your post, did you mean the jack was under the control arm? Where you want the jack, is on the hub itself.

Below is a picture of a vehicle (Not a Ridgeline)t, but is for information purpose only.

The red circle is the balljoint area of the control arm. DO NOT place the jack there
The green area is where the hub is exposed. Once you get the rotor off, you should be able to place the jack on the hub and push it up. You could also use the tie-rod end area to lift the hub up. Another thing is the ears where the brake caliper bracket bolts up; you can use that too.

398048
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
@Timothy Jerome , Unless I misread your post, did you mean the jack was under the control arm? Where you want the jack, is on the hub itself.

Below is a picture of a vehicle (Not a Ridgeline)t, but is for information purpose only.

The red circle is the balljoint area of the control arm. DO NOT place the jack there
The green area is where the hub is exposed. Once you get the rotor off, you should be able to place the jack on the hub and push it up. You could also use the tie-rod end area to lift the hub up. Another thing is the ears where the brake caliper bracket bolts up; you can use that too.

View attachment 398048
Ahhh thats what you meant! A picture is worth a thousand... I finally managed to bang it out, I turned the wheel all the way to the right and had at it with a rental pickle fork. The ones I had were to narrow. It came off and funny thing there wasnt even much corrosion on the inside surfaces. I will post pics later. Thanks man!
 

·
Premium Member
2010 RT - Bali Blue
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
Glad you got it worked out. I found the removal of the control arms rather easy, though when putting it back in and juggling the hub/suspension was daunting.
The rental fork is what is needed. My passenger side came out good, the driver side joint was a bit difficult to get out and good thing I go to the gym.
BTW, what brand control arms did you go with and where did you get them from?

Now you need an alignment!!
 

·
Premium Member
2010 RT - Bali Blue
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
Cool, that's the supreme version. Any reason you went with those, than the regular ones?

I went with the basic OEM replacement and had some irregularities on the passenger side one.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top