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I disagree. The more stable the fuel, the better the ignition and eliminates misfires. The compression ratio of Honda RL AWD is larger than the Tacoma and the Tacoma uses a higher stable fuel than what the Ridgeline recommends (87).

Please state you proof if you disagree. I am willing to learn from you.
 

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The more stable the fuel, the better the ignition and eliminates misfires.
Incorrect.

The octane rating of gasoline is a measurement of its resistance to compression-ignition and nothing more. It is not a measure of the gasoline's detergent content. Higher octane gasoline doesn't "improve ignition" or eliminate misfires. What it does do is reduce the propensity for the air-fuel mixture to ignite before the spark plug fires.

Source: Science.

The compression ratio of Honda RL AWD is larger than the Tacoma...
Incorrect.

The compression ratio of the Ridgeline's engine is 11.5:1.
The compression ratio of the Tacoma's 3.5L V6 engine is 11.8:1.

Source: Specifications on each manufacturer's website.

...the Tacoma uses a higher stable fuel than what the Ridgeline recommends (87).
Incorrect.

87 octane is recommended for both the Ridgeline and Tacoma by their respective manufacturers.

Source: The owner's manuals.
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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I just wanna know how to shift to 4wd while I'm rolling down the highway. ;)

Perhaps that's a G2 feature.
 

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The only components warranted for 8/80 are the catalytic converters and the PCM/ECM. This coverage falls under the "specific major emission control components" portion of the federal emissions warranty. The other emission control components covered under the federal emission warranty are covered for 2/24, but the 3/36 new vehicle limited warranty overrides this coverage. Unless you purchased a Honda Care VSC or other "extended warranty" that covers the fuel injectors, your warranty for your fuel injectors ended at 3/36 in Wisconsin since they're not one of the 13 states that follow the 7/70 California emissions warranty. If Honda wants to pay for your injector replacement, that's great! But, they're not obligated to.
I talked to a Honda mechanic about recent problems with newer vehicles and not just with Honda. Fuel injection problems are due to DIRECT FUEL INJECTION. Fuel is injected at the top of the cylinder directly versus behind the valves as on my 2009 Ridgeline. What manufacturers are finding, is that the injectors are fouling with carbon deposits prematurely.

This issue is known but manufacturers are not owning up to it (Perhaps that is why Ridgeline 2020 models have a new injector part number and perhaps a redesign (?).
DFI is more efficient, cars get better gas mileage and bit more power. However, the downside of what they are finding are fouling issues. Google “ direct fuel injection issues” and you can learn more about this real problem.
Hope this helps and ends further frustrating questions about these problems that keeps cropping up in forums.
 

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I talked to a Honda mechanic about recent problems with newer vehicles and not just with Honda. Fuel injection problems are due to DIRECT FUEL INJECTION. Fuel is injected at the top of the cylinder directly versus behind the valves as on my 2009 Ridgeline. What manufacturers are finding, is that the injectors are fouling with carbon deposits prematurely.

This issue is known but manufacturers are not owning up to it (Perhaps that is why Ridgeline 2020 models have a new injector part number and perhaps a redesign (?).
DFI is more efficient, cars get better gas mileage and bit more power. However, the downside of what they are finding are fouling issues. Google “ direct fuel injection issues” and you can learn more about this real problem.
Hope this helps and ends further frustrating questions about these problems that keeps cropping up in forums.
Early DI engines has issues with the carbon built-up on the intake valves (not injectors), but that has largely been addressed and has never been much of an issue with Honda's DI engines which have been around for seven years now.

The injector issue with the Ridgeline and other Honda models using this engine is related to manufacturing debris in the high pressure fuel pump and injectors causing them to leak or clog. Carbon is not the issue here.
 

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Early DI engines has issues with the carbon built-up on the intake valves (not injectors), but that has largely been addressed and has never been much of an issue with Honda's DI engines which have been around for seven years now.

The injector issue with the Ridgeline and other Honda models using this engine is related to manufacturing debris in the high pressure fuel pump and injectors causing them to leak or clog. Carbon is not the issue here.
OK, thanks and that’s good to know, but I do know that there still exists an endemic problem with DFI due to carbon fouling based upon my research and it supports what the Honda tech told me last week of his experiences with Honda Pilots having this issue.
 

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2019 RT Ridgeline ~ Luna Silver
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On the subject of the 2020 injector part number being changed.

I haven’t seen a late 2018 or 2019 with injector problems. Since switching from the 305 to the 315 injectors. Although it may be too soon. Mileage wise....only time will tell.

My other thought is the start/stop option in the 2020...if this is the reason for the part number change. Since there quiet a few system changes in the 2020 to accommodate this option. Starter, battery etc. just a thought...

It seems the 315 injectors seem to be working fine so far?
The high end Pilot models had a different injector number also. Always assumed this was due to stop/start.
 

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Anyone here using some sort of fuel injector cleaner to prevent the carbon/debris build up? If so, which one?
 

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I'm not because all evidence points to that sort of thing just being burned up in the cylinder without ever actually cleaning the surface of the injector. I don't think there's evidence for my method, but eventually when I accrue high miles I'll just rev the engine at higher RPMs for longer periods every so often to dislodge and burn away any buildup, so there's no buildup from constant babying.
 

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So far I’ve just used top tier fuels... Name brand fuels with additives.

If I did use something it would be Lucas Injector Treatment. I use it in my 99 f150. Ive seen it help that engine over time. But it’s port injected. So...
 

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Isn't the problem with contaminants that were left over from manufacturing? How is an additive going to do anything for metal (etc) particles?
 
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