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I just purchased a 2007 RTS with tonneau cover and 39000 miles. I love the truck, but I'm getting around 11.5 miles per gallon driving 75% freeway! I cant figure out whats wrong, but this being my second vehicle purchase I'm starting to get pretty sketched out about it. I know I still have the existing power train warranty, I'm just not sure what the dealer can do when I walk up and tell them that I'm getting poor mpg. I have been especially driving careful to increase my mpg, but I just figure the dealer is going to look at me like I'm an idiot and tell me to drive better. Does anyone have any knowledge or reassurance that they can help me out with?
 

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If you still have the OEM Michelin tires on it, set the tire pressure to 32psi in all four tires. Make sure each of the four wheels turn freely when off the ground. Make sure you are running 87 octane (Or higher) gasoline.

Drive at 70mph or below (What ever the legal speed limit is). Take it easy (Shift point around 2700-3000rpms) when accelerating and use the cruise control on the highway where safe.
 

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The best mpg is ~55 mph (so I remember). How fast on the Interstate do you drive? How much bumper-to-bumper traffic? driving style? Do you let your truck warm up when cold ? if so, how long?

Winter gas also will affect it slightly. Are you sure no one is stealing gas from your tank?
 

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Check your air filter and replace if necessary. Engines are great big air movers and if it's having to work harder to get air into it, that will lower your mileage. Since you bought it used, change your oil and other fluids now as well...that way you're sure you've got everything working at peak performance. Obvious, but unsaid, check your driving habits. Jackrabbit starts and racing to get up to speed will devour gas mileage. Slow it down a bit, try and keep the RPM's under 3,000 when accelerating and as stated earlier, check your tire pressure and keep it under 70. You truck is past the break in period, so you should be getting better mileage than you are getting. Good luck and welcome to the ROC!
 

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no you need to get in and have the truck checked out you got a problem. poor milage could be caused by a number of things. best have it looked at then try to change your habits
 

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dare I ask if you are calculating your mpg correctly? :act006:
 

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You might need to redo the Idle Learn Procedure.

The Idle Learn Procedure may not help you at all. However, It only takes a few minutes to do and and can't hurt anything as it is part of the Honda new car get ready. A 10mm wrench or adjustable works good.

Easy version:

Start with a cold engine.

Turn on ignition switch and make sure that every accessory is turned OFF. AC,radio,all lights, everything.

Turn off ignition switch.

Disconnect the negative (Black) battery cable for 5 minutes.

Re connect battery cable. (**)

DO NOT TOUCH THROTTLE. Turn ignition switch on for 2 seconds,................ then start car.

DO NOT TOUCH THE THROTTLE. Let it idle with all accessories turned off.

DO NOT TOUCH THE THROTTLE. In about 10-15 minutes,in 70-80 degree weather, the radiator cooling fans will cycle. (It will take longer in colder weather.)

DO NOT TOUCH THE THROTTLE. After the second cycle let it idle an additional 10 minutes.
(The fans will probably cycle some more during this additional 10 minutes.)

Here is a TIP: No reason to stand around waiting for those 1st 2 fan cycles. After re connecting the battery cable (**) above. DO NOT TOUCH THE THROTTLE. and start the car. Go back in the house and do something for a half hour or so. Give it a chance to warm up. Then go back out and listen or watch for the fans to cycle twice. Then go back in the house and let it idle that additional ten minutes.

It doesn't matter if you missed "SEEING" the very first two cycles. The important thing is that it got AT LEAST 2 fan cycles and the additional 10 minutes, and any cycles that may have occurred during that additional 10 minutes.

Then: Switch off engine. Reset radio and driver AUTO window.

To reset driver window:

Turn on ignition switch. Get the window to the top.

Push down and hold driver window button including that extra little "AUTO" click

Continue to hold an additional 2 seconds after window stops at the bottom.

Pull up the switch including the "AUTO" click and hold up an additional 2 seconds after window reaches top and stops moving.

Release the switch.

Now "auto window" should be working.

The radio may need the code - It should be on the glove box door and in the packet of Honda Manuals.
 

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Also it's winter time. I'm getting about 11mpg on my '10 right now because of: Warming up in morning, driving a lot in stop n go traffic, etc. Do what everyone says above and you'll be fine.
 

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Warming up in morning
Fuel injected engines do not need warm-up. In 1 mile the heat is coming out of the vents.

I never warm up my Ridgeline - complete waste of fuel ( and money ).

Winter fuel and cold had taken my normal 19.8mpg to 16.5mpg for the last 2 tanks ( it has not been over 40 degrees here either tank ).
 

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Fuel injected engines do not need warm-up. In 1 mile the heat is coming out of the vents.

I never warm up my Ridgeline - complete waste of fuel ( and money ).

Winter fuel and cold had taken my normal 19.8mpg to 16.5mpg for the last 2 tanks ( it has not been over 40 degrees here either tank ).
i ENJOY THIS FORUM BUT THIS IS ONE OF THE GREATEST ISSUES WITH THEM, MISINFORMATION!! It is a good idea to let any engine warm up before use. The fact that you are getting warm air has nothing to do with the relubrication that happens during low rev. warm up period. Although i doubt it with 40k miles but it may need to have the valve timing adjusted, possable if it was poorly broken in and driven hard. I get around 13-15 mpg at 80 mph with larger winter tires.

I have yet to test this but i know the ridge goes into front wheel only drive at above 80 mph, any one know if you get better mpg at 85 compared to 78 mph?
 

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Fuel injected engines do not need warm-up. In 1 mile the heat is coming out of the vents.

I never warm up my Ridgeline - complete waste of fuel ( and money ).

Winter fuel and cold had taken my normal 19.8mpg to 16.5mpg for the last 2 tanks ( it has not been over 40 degrees here either tank ).
To each their own. When it's 3 degrees F outside and I have 6" of snow and ice on the truck it's going to get warmed up for about 10 minutes before it gets driven. It's all good at above freezing but in the above condition the windshield wipers are frozen in a block of ice and the windows won't roll down and I can go on if you'd like. I'll be happy to spend a few bucks to get into a vehicle that's warm and you can see out of. Just my opinion:act002:
 

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i ENJOY THIS FORUM BUT THIS IS ONE OF THE GREATEST ISSUES WITH THEM, MISINFORMATION!! It is a good idea to let any engine warm up before use. The fact that you are getting warm air has nothing to do with the relubrication that happens during low rev. warm up period. Although i doubt it with 40k miles but it may need to have the valve timing adjusted, possable if it was poorly broken in and driven hard. I get around 13-15 mpg at 80 mph with larger winter tires.

I have yet to test this but i know the ridge goes into front wheel only drive at above 80 mph, any one know if you get better mpg at 85 compared to 78 mph?
Daytime interstate without AC at 74mph I get 20-23 if not having a head wind. At 85 I get 17.5-19. This is using 87 octane. Higher octane only does better at altitude or when towing for me. Some places in Texas have regular 84 octane and you take a big hit.:act030:
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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i ENJOY THIS FORUM BUT THIS IS ONE OF THE GREATEST ISSUES WITH THEM, MISINFORMATION!! It is a good idea to let any engine warm up before use. The fact that you are getting warm air has nothing to do with the relubrication that happens during low rev. warm up period. Although i doubt it with 40k miles but it may need to have the valve timing adjusted, possable if it was poorly broken in and driven hard. I get around 13-15 mpg at 80 mph with larger winter tires.

I have yet to test this but i know the ridge goes into front wheel only drive at above 80 mph, any one know if you get better mpg at 85 compared to 78 mph?
It depends on what you mean by warm up before use. There is no need to let the engine fully warm up before driving. I crank up and then drive gently keeping rpms low (2000-2500 or less) the first few miles until the oil temp and the engine alloys have had what time I think they need to stabilize.

http://autos.aol.com/article/warm-up-car

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Ask-Our-Experts/Green-Transportation/Car-Engine-Warm-Up.aspx
 

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I was expecting Andy-Montreal to post this: :act018:

Here's what the Canadian environment ministry has to say:

•An idling engine releases twice as many exhaust fumes than a vehicle in motion.
•If every driver in Canada avoided idling for 5 minutes a day, we could prevent 1.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide from being emitted.
•No more than 30 seconds of idling is needed for oil to circulate through your engine. Many components, such as the wheel bearings, tires and suspension system will only warm up once the vehicle is moving.
•Restarting your car many times has little impact on engine components, adding only around $10 per year to the cost of driving, money that is recovered in fuel savings.
•Ten seconds of idling uses more fuel than restarting the engine.
Idling can damage your engine since it is not operating at its peak temperature where fuel is completely burned. Fuel residue from incomplete burning can damage engine parts.
•Idling a vehicle for 10 minutes a day uses an average of 100 litres of gas a year. If gas costs 70 cents a litre, you will save $70 per year, just by turning your key.
•During the winter, Canadians idle their vehicles for a combined total of 75 million minutes/day. This is equal to a vehicle idling for 144 years. Although we idle our vehicles about 40% less in summer, we still waste an enormous amount of fuel and money.
•A block heater warms the oil and engine coolant, making it easier to start your vehicle and improving winter fuel economy by as much as 10%.

Click and Clack say that it's unnecessary to warm up modern cars for the purposes of engine health.
 

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I just purchased a 2007 RTS with tonneau cover and 39000 miles. I love the truck, but I'm getting around 11.5 miles per gallon driving 75% freeway! I cant figure out whats wrong, but this being my second vehicle purchase I'm starting to get pretty sketched out about it. I know I still have the existing power train warranty, I'm just not sure what the dealer can do when I walk up and tell them that I'm getting poor mpg. I have been especially driving careful to increase my mpg, but I just figure the dealer is going to look at me like I'm an idiot and tell me to drive better. Does anyone have any knowledge or reassurance that they can help me out with?
There is something wrong with your vehicle. I drive around 75 MPH on the way to work all the time and, in the summer I average right around 20 MPG, and in the winter I get around 17.5 (because, yes, I do warm up my vehicle on cold mornings). There is no reason what-so-ever that you should be getting 11.5 MPG driving mostly highway miles.

I track my mileage very closely, because a sudden decrease in mileage is usually the first sign something is wrong with your vehicle. You need to take your truck into the dealer and have them take a look at it. You might want to try the re-learn procedure posted above first but, if that does not help, time to take it in. If the dealership service guy looks at you odd, when you tell them to look at your vehicle because of low mileage, ask for somebody who knows what the hell they are doing....! :act024:
 

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I have heard that many manufacturers are having problems with Oxygen sensors going bad due to the ethnol in the gas. It has caused major problems in my Motorcycles.

Now - My Neighbors tundra was getting terrible mileage and they changed out his Oxygen sensors - His gas mileage is now back to normal.
 

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Not certain what your problem is, but ethanol is definitely a mpg robber. A much better alchohol substitute would be isopropol alchohol, but I cannot afford to use it by the ounce.:act010:

Once characteristic of Isopropol alchohol that makes it attractive is that it does not separate in liquid as does ethanol.

Hope you find out the cause. Here in Colorado, my RL has never gotten very good mileage--always under 18 mpg.

Brad
 

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Welcome to the wonderful world of Ridgeline!!!! I get good mileage in the spring, summer and fall but winter!!!! not good at all. Todays high is 2 degrees here, Yes 2. and it is suppose to go to -18 to -20 tonight. With the cold and the 15 to 20 minute warm up times, plus the additives they put in the gas up here to keep it from freezing I get 11 to 12.5 in the winter. Hope this helps. Dave
 

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I was expecting Andy-Montreal to post this: :act018:

Here's what the Canadian environment ministry has to say:

•An idling engine releases twice as many exhaust fumes than a vehicle in motion.
•If every driver in Canada avoided idling for 5 minutes a day, we could prevent 1.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide from being emitted.
•No more than 30 seconds of idling is needed for oil to circulate through your engine. Many components, such as the wheel bearings, tires and suspension system will only warm up once the vehicle is moving.
•Restarting your car many times has little impact on engine components, adding only around $10 per year to the cost of driving, money that is recovered in fuel savings.
•Ten seconds of idling uses more fuel than restarting the engine.
Idling can damage your engine since it is not operating at its peak temperature where fuel is completely burned. Fuel residue from incomplete burning can damage engine parts.
•Idling a vehicle for 10 minutes a day uses an average of 100 litres of gas a year. If gas costs 70 cents a litre, you will save $70 per year, just by turning your key.
•During the winter, Canadians idle their vehicles for a combined total of 75 million minutes/day. This is equal to a vehicle idling for 144 years. Although we idle our vehicles about 40% less in summer, we still waste an enormous amount of fuel and money.
•A block heater warms the oil and engine coolant, making it easier to start your vehicle and improving winter fuel economy by as much as 10%.

Click and Clack say that it's unnecessary to warm up modern cars for the purposes of engine health.
As I said, everyone (and apparently the Canadian Enviroment Ministry and Click and Clack) is entitled to their opinion. I'm sure the southern and the western portions of the US don't warm up their trucks much but about everyone from me on north does. It's as much a safety issue as anything as wipers won't work when frozen to the windshield! Now, I don't start it to cool it down in the summer months if that counts lol and I don't have too many traffic jams to sit in and idle.
 
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