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Discussion Starter #1
Ive started shopping for a cheap <$10k Ridgeline, 150k+ miles. Ideally I would have liked a 2WD version if offered just for lower complexity. Any serious issues I should be aware of ie engine, transmission, AWD system? THanks much!
 

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As long as the maintenance records show a timing belt change around 100K and the water pump and radiator fitting look good then you should basically be okay. However, you always need to look over the whole vehicle for everyone treats their truck differently and have done different things with them.
 

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Agree with above. Maybe search "smod" for further reading about radiator fittings. While not 100% accurate, I think the Ridgeline beds and seats often reflect how previous owners take care of their trucks.
 

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Agree with above. Maybe search "smod" for further reading about radiator fittings. While not 100% accurate, I think the Ridgeline beds and seats often reflect how previous owners take care of their trucks.
"Take care" or "use?" their trucks? ;)

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've looked at the Carfax for a dozen vehicles and only 1 had documented a timing belt/water pump replacement, even ones that had been well taken care of at the Dealer. Will a pre-sale inspection reveal whether or not those items have been dealt with? Been reading that a Carfax service records are far from accurate.
 

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I've looked at the Carfax for a dozen vehicles and only 1 had documented a timing belt/water pump replacement, even ones that had been well taken care of at the Dealer. Will a pre-sale inspection reveal whether or not those items have been dealt with? Been reading that a Carfax service records are far from accurate.
Carfax records for maintenance is not a reliable source. Look at the owner's receipts, find out what shop they used and talk to them, or have a mechanic inspect the vehicle (there are usually signs that can tell a mechanic that something has or has not been done to something in the engine bay). Carfax is good for identifying previous and current ownership and accident information, that's about it in my opinion.
 

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Ive started shopping for a cheap <$10k Ridgeline, 150k+ miles. Ideally I would have liked a 2WD version if offered just for lower complexity. Any serious issues I should be aware of ie engine, transmission, AWD system? THanks much!
I believe all first-generation Ridgelines (2006-2014) are AWD; FWD started in generation 2.
 

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I believe all first-generation Ridgelines (2006-2014) are AWD; FWD started in generation 2.
That is correct and for Gen2s only the 2017 RT and RTS and the 2017-2019 Sport, RTL, and RTL-T trims were/are available in FWD. Since the FWD version was designed for the SoCal market, maybe there are more used ones in that part of the country than others, maybe.
 

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That is correct and for Gen2s only the 2017 RT and RTS and the 2017-2019 Sport, RTL, and RTL-T trims were/are available in FWD. Since the FWD version was designed for the SoCal market, maybe there are more used ones in that part of the country than others, maybe.
With our gas prices being 50% higher than the rest of the country, maybe that FWD was a good idea... Gotta wonder how it would perform under load, though...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You really wouldn't save any at the pump. The AWD is essentially FWD until and only if the front wheels slip do the rear wheels engage is my understanding.
 

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You really wouldn't save any at the pump. The AWD is essentially FWD until and only if the front wheels slip do the rear wheels engage is my understanding.
Not quite. At initial start, the AWD puts power down to all four wheel with a bias toward the rear and gradually moves into FWD for cruising efficiency. Plus, because its AWD, the drive shaft and rear differential are still spinning even though there is no power/torque being sent to it, so you get extra drag in the AWD that you don't get in the FWD. Also you get a lighter truck with no drive-shaft and iVTM4 components.
396750
 

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Finding a decent RL for under $10k may prove to be a difficult challenge. These trucks are extremely reliable, but it's fairly difficult to find ones that have been well maintained and taken care of by their owners. My '07 RTL has just under 174k miles on it and I've been a stickler for maintenance and keeping it in good shape. Even then, the evil rust cancer is starting to rear its ugly head on certain parts. I'm coming up on 10 years of ownership and I'm planning to keep her until she doesn't move anymore.

You'll most certainly want to ensure the timing belt service has been done and, as said previously, there's not one good way to tell if it's been done or not. When I had mine done, the dealer put a sticker on the fuse panel showing the mileage at which the service was done. If you are able to find a private party truck, you'd be able to talk to the owner. If it's at a dealership, your only hope would be to have a Honda dealer search the VIN in their systems to see if they can extract the maintenance history. I bought my truck as a private party sale and the seller was able to contact the original dealer in Florida to have all of the maintenance records printed.

When looking, get under the truck and look for any signs of leaks or excessive rust. Check the conditions of the axle boots, brake lines, shocks, springs, and drive shaft. Open the tailgate both ways and ensure it operates properly. Open the trunk and every door to check for proper fit. Put the rear seat bottoms up and ensure the support bars retract. If they don't, there are broken plastic pulleys in there that will need replaced with metal ones. Check all the door seal rubber as well as the functionality of every button and switch. Under the hood, check the condition of all the belts and hoses and listen for any strange noises while the engine is running. Take it for a test drive with the windows down and radio off. Listen and feel for any signs of strange handling, grinding noises, erratic shifting, etc. Keep in mind that you're going to be looking at an inexpensive, older, high mileage vehicle. Some noises or rattling is expected, but just make sure they're not "big deal noises".

Once you find your truck, you're going to want to do some instant maintenance items on it to set a baseline. If you're unable to determine when the fluids were changed, change them. This includes engine oil, power steering, brake, coolant, and drains and fills of the transmission fluid, front transfer case gear oil, and the VTM-4 rear diff fluid. Also, swap out the engine air filter and the cabin air filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks IanRTL! Great info there. I will most likely buy the truck sight unseen as I hope to find one that hasn't been driven for the last 10 years battling snow and corrosion. Im in MN. So I am looking for trucks in the south. Ill insist on a pre-sale inspection no matter who I am dealing with that will hopefully inspect all that you have listed and then some.
 
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