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Quoted from today's USA Today:
"IIHS conducts several types of crash tests and evaluates vehicles' integration of various safety technologies such as automatic braking. It often updates its standards to include new features, such as several years ago when it required improved roof strength to prevent injuries in rollover crashes.
One surprise was that the only pickup truck to earn the highest honor was the new Honda Ridgeline. Pickups from General Motors, Ford, Fiat Chrysler, Toyota and Nissan all failed to make the list."
AMEN:x
 

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Quoted from today's USA Today:
"IIHS conducts several types of crash tests and evaluates vehicles' integration of various safety technologies such as automatic braking. It often updates its standards to include new features, such as several years ago when it required improved roof strength to prevent injuries in rollover crashes.
One surprise was that the only pickup truck to earn the highest honor was the new Honda Ridgeline. Pickups from General Motors, Ford, Fiat Chrysler, Toyota and Nissan all failed to make the list."
AMEN:x
Not surprising. The rest are all body on frame. People think their full size trucks are safe due to size, but they are not as safe as a solid passenger car (sedan, hatchback, wagon, coupe, etc) when they have severe impact. I've tried to explain to my truck driving brethren for years but they don't listen and think they're safe as kittens.
 

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Very pleased with the results however the only reason it beat out the F-150 is because of the excellent LED headlights on the BE, E and Touring models. The claim is somewhat misleading because you need to get the fully loaded version for it to be valid. If you compare the other Ridgeline models, it would tie with a F-150 which is still a great feat. Regardless, it's not headlight or automatic braking that concerns me most, it's hw well it holds up after a good hit and in this respect ALL Ridgelines pass with flying colors. Amazing how something so little such as headlights can put it over the top. Guess what Ford is going to redesign next year. :grin:
 

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The LED headlamps on the F150 had both excessive glare and inadequate forward illumination. No amount of re-aiming will correct that flaw.
 

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Take a look at the left front wheel disintegrate, never seen a wheel do that before. It occurs at about 15 seconds in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93B_ymBb7ds
The wreck can have the wheel. That's a totaled vehicle in real world so a rim means absolutely nothing. The impressive feat is the chassis, and how the engine is mounted in the chassis. Notice how the engine compartment completely collapses, absorbing all the impact, and leaves the cabin relatively unscathed. That truck would be a total write off on the open road in this scenario. The driver and passenger would have some blows from the air bags deploying but even the camera inside the video shows the steering wheel and side airbags cushioning the dummy/occupant very well. Very impressive all around. The new Ridgeline has some glaring design and QC flaws so far, but the crash worthiness is best in class, to me, for trucks on the market. Very pleased with the IIHS scores all around, even without the high end trims.
 

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Take a look at the left front wheel disintegrate, never seen a wheel do that before. It occurs at about 15 seconds in.
That's typical of cast aluminum wheels. My old roommate slammed his mustang into a curb sideways (me in the passenger seat), and it shattered the wheels. The rim was still solid, but the spokes and hub broke into several pieces.
 

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Not surprising. The rest are all body on frame. People think their full size trucks are safe due to size, but they are not as safe as a solid passenger car (sedan, hatchback, wagon, coupe, etc) when they have severe impact. I've tried to explain to my truck driving brethren for years but they don't listen and think they're safe as kittens.
Depends on what you hit. Laws of physics still apply. In a Ram vs Civic collision, would you really want to be in the Civic?

SUVs are safer than cars in front crashes, but there is more to the story

The researchers concluded that at least for head-on crashes, the vehicle type is more important than the crash-test rating in predicting survival.
 

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The more stuff that breaks/folds/bends in front of the driver, the more impact force is absorbed.

Impressed with how well the RL did in that video. But like someone else here said, it's a unibody, and is built for that.

I've also noticed that the engine in the RL is really low. My old Pilot had an engine that almost scraped the hood, as does our Odyssey. The RL engine is quite low in comparison, which is good for this.

Pete
 

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That's typical of cast aluminum wheels. My old roommate slammed his mustang into a curb sideways (me in the passenger seat), and it shattered the wheels. The rim was still solid, but the spokes and hub broke into several pieces.
Good to know you were in one piece:smile:
 

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Love watching these crash vids. The farthest traveling projectile is that Honda emblem. The weight of that thing makes it look almost computer animated. IIHS doesn't test the death of bystanders via monikers. :)

Cool stuff. Can anyone answer why they tested without the driver window up, most others have the window up (except the RAM). Just wonder if small minutia like driver glass can affect that side curtain airbag.

Interesting, none the less, and makes me feel a little better about my purchase if I get frustrated. Thanks for sharing.

EDIT: Noticed the infotainment screen looks like it is in advance (hidden) menu, wonder what annoyance the driver was trying to bypass before his accident? My bet is the parking sensors. (I keed)
 

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Take a look at the left front wheel disintegrate, never seen a wheel do that before. It occurs at about 15 seconds in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93B_ymBb7ds
The wheel's ability to collapse is actually a key component of the narrow off-set engineering. You'll notice some of the poor performers, the wheel gets shoved into the driver footwell area. Not good.

Sometimes during a development the wheel design is actually too strong, and it has to be revised to weaken it a bit to collapse properly in an impact.

Also something to consider if fitting aftermarket wheels to your vehicle.
 

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The wheel's ability to collapse is actually a key component of the narrow off-set engineering. You'll notice some of the poor performers, the wheel gets shoved into the driver footwell area. Not good.

Sometimes during a development the wheel design is actually too strong, and it has to be revised to weaken it a bit to collapse properly in an impact.

Also something to consider if fitting aftermarket wheels to your vehicle.
Another excellent reason to keep OEM wheels and tires.
 
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