Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,334 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After so much controversy for many years on the internet surrounding the use of nitrogen filled tires Honda has updated their official policy on the issue. The following is what they issued:

This article replaces “Nitrogen Inflation: What’s Our Position,” issued in September 2006.

Just search the internet, and you’ll find plenty of info on filling tires with nitrogen. But when it comes to filling automobile tires, we recommend only one thing: dry, compressed air. Filling tires with nitrogen really isn’t anything new; it’s been around a long time. It’s commonly used in commercial and government aircraft and vehicles, and even motorsport vehicles. To meet rigid safety and performance specs, the required tire inflation pressures are often very high, especially in the aerospace industry. The space shuttle’s tires, for instance, were filled to 315 psi!

Here’s what makes nitrogen ideal for these applications:

• Nitrogen is an inert gas; it doesn’t burn or oxidize.

• The compression process for nitrogen removes moisture, so it’s a dry gas. Since it’s dry, it has no moisture to contribute extra pressure changes with temperature. Water vapor can expand if the temperature climbs above 212° F.

• Tires filled with nitrogen leak more slowly over time than those filled with compressed air.
But automobile tires are subjected to an entirely different set of conditions.

Here’s why we say no to nitrogen:

• Nitrogen generators produce nitrogen gas from ambient air, but it’s at something less than 100 percent purity. To get just that same level of purity into a tire, you’d have to deflate and fill it several times to purge the remaining air. And if you don’t do that, the purity level drops even more. Compressed air is already about 78 percent nitrogen.

• Although tires filled with nitrogen leak more slowly over time than those with compressed air, they still leak. If you can’t find a place that offers nitrogen, your only option is to fill with compressed air, which, as we’ve said, drops the nitrogen purity.

• Nitrogen doesn’t offer any better protection than compressed air against cuts and punctures from road hazards. So no matter what you fill the tires with, you’ve still got to check their condition and pressures at least once a month, as we clearly state in the owner’s manual. And on vehicles with TPMS, filling the tires with nitrogen won’t reduce the frequency of the low tire pressure indicator coming on in cold weather.

• Tires filled with compressed air and properly maintained offer the same fuel efficiency and performance as those filled with nitrogen.

So here’s the bottom line: Although nitrogen offers certain advantages for commercial, government, and motorsport applications, for automobile tires you’re better off with dry, compressed air. That’s why we say no to nitrogen. We also clearly state this in the Dealer Operations Manual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,705 Posts
Good to know! How often should we replace the whole air in our tires? Is that a good thing to do? or just add air as needed?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,334 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Good to know! How often should we replace the whole air in our tires? Is that a good thing to do? or just add air as needed?
Just keep your tires properly inflated, regularly rotate and balance them and you'll get the most out of your tires.

No need for changing air, and certainly not nitrogen.

I'll add my opinion to the above... some places provide nitrogen inflation for free as an incentive for you to keep coming back to them. That's fine, but don't feel obligated to continue using nitrogen.

Any place that tries to charge you extra, or tell you that nitrogen is required is nothing but a scam artist that should be avoided. Don't just refuse the nitrogen... go elsewhere. If they try and scam you on nitrogen they will probably do it in other ways as well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
655 Posts
If you go into any facility and ask them to change the air In your tires, they will probably call the nice guys in the white coats. Anyone remember "Crash Collins" on Candid Camera in the 60s? They had a skit on exactly this. Whenever I am asked if i want nitrogen, I just tell them that I prefer to use 80% nitrogen instead of 100%. That usually throws them a curve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,360 Posts
The author of the article needs to brush up on basic chemistry. Nitrogen is NOT an inert gas like helium, neon, argon, etc. It's more reactive than carbon and less so than oxygen. Speaking of oxygen, nitrogen oxides that are the result of combustion are infamous components of air pollution.

Aside from slower leaks, the pressure of N filled tires supposedly varies less with seasonal temperature changes.

There's nothing wrong with filling tires with N and it may have some benefits. However, I don't see paying extra for N inflation.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,334 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
The author of the article needs to brush up on basic chemistry. Nitrogen is NOT an inert gas like helium, neon, argon, etc. It's more reactive than carbon and less so than oxygen. Speaking of oxygen, nitrogen oxides that are the result of combustion are infamous components of air pollution.

Aside from slower leaks, the pressure of N filled tires supposedly varies less with seasonal temperature changes.

There's nothing wrong with filling tires with N and it may have some benefits. However, I don't see paying extra for N inflation.
I did my best to take as little chemistry as possible, but I was subjected to some despite my objections.

Back in the stone age when I studies such things the Noble and Inert gasses were synonyms. From what I'm told they teach such things differently today and nitrogen is not a Noble gas and as such is technically not inert, but in the practical sense of the application it is considered inert. I suppose this could be another source of controversy in itself that many could argue for years that makes no difference in the real issue.

I don't defend the author, or even really care that much... I just don't like seeing people ripped off by being told or sold that nitrogen in their tires will solve any problems. The green Schrader valve caps have become more of a hobo mark to take advantage of someone more than anything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
And my Honda dealer wanted to charge me $49.95 for Nitrogen Filled Tires when I bought the 2012 Accord Sport. Either they removed the extra charge or I would walk. They removed the charge.
 

·
Super Moderator
2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
Joined
·
22,887 Posts
There's a local garage that has a sign up advertising a Nitrogen filling service for tires for only $29.95. I laugh everytime I pass that place.

Do you suppose they take the tire down to vacuum and then put in pure Nitrogen? Nah, didn't think so!

I like jimfrancis' answer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,705 Posts
I have been wondering if the nitrogen air they put in my michelin MS tires for my Ford SUV is what kept them from cracking, 2 years after I got Michelins from Sears for my RL and nearly 2 years after cracks on the rubber. My Ford Suv tires 4 plus years later are still in great shape, if I have a chance to get free Nitrogen on my Latitudes I had for over a year I will even not knowing if it is going to help or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
Change the air every time you change your tires. *Never* re-use the same air in a new tire!

KeS
Just for the fun if it, next time I change my tires, I'm going to say could you please use the same air that's in my old tires and put it in my new ones as I already paid for it and it's mine.:act062: See what kind of looks I'm going to get. LOL....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,360 Posts
I have been wondering if the nitrogen air they put in my michelin MS tires for my Ford SUV is what kept them from cracking, 2 years after I got Michelins from Sears for my RL and nearly 2 years after cracks on the rubber. My Ford Suv tires 4 plus years later are still in great shape, if I have a chance to get free Nitrogen on my Latitudes I had for over a year I will even not knowing if it is going to help or not.
Are both kept outside in the sun? Does one spend time in the desert? What are the date codes on the tires?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,421 Posts
Just for the fun if it, next time I change my tires, I'm going to say could you please use the same air that's in my old tires and put it in my new ones as I already paid for it and it's mine.:act062: See what kind of looks I'm going to get. LOL....
If they say they can do that, run, run very far away!!! :act018:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,259 Posts
I have been wondering if the nitrogen air they put in my michelin MS tires for my Ford SUV is what kept them from cracking, 2 years after I got Michelins from Sears for my RL and nearly 2 years after cracks on the rubber. My Ford Suv tires 4 plus years later are still in great shape, if I have a chance to get free Nitrogen on my Latitudes I had for over a year I will even not knowing if it is going to help or not.
You realize the nitrogen is on the inside, and the cracks are on the outside, right??

KeS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,705 Posts
Are both kept outside in the sun? Does one spend time in the desert? What are the date codes on the tires?
Both parked within 15 feet same angle and open on both sides the Fords have a 2007 date, still good, the Hondas replaced at the end of 09, and cracks developed and were replaced within 2 years. Both cars were driven at least 2-3 times a week minimum.
Same model brand tires.

Im not saying nitro is the reason for not failing, some have said the old air can affect their life, not sure about the outside. My guess it was just a Michelin MS and size that was affected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
602 Posts
Good to know! How often should we replace the whole air in our tires? Is that a good thing to do? or just add air as needed?
Winter And Summer: Never run summer air in tires in the winter or winter air in the tires in the summer.:act002:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
Winter And Summer: Never run summer air in tires in the winter or winter air in the tires in the summer.:act002:
I did not know air had seasons. I think air is air is air. You have dry air, and you have humid air. The biggest concern to me would be the air tempature. If your air is warm and you get a sudden drop in outdoor tempature, well you warm air is going to get cold hence shrink therefore show a lower pressure thus TPMS light on. The difference is Nitrogen does not react as would normal air thus less prone to shrinkage. When TPMS light comes on, just drive a few miles to get the air warmed-up in your tires thus expanding the air which will cause the TPMS light to go off. When you live in Canada, the change of tempature and season will create these issues moreso than our US counterparts as we have a higher fluctuation in tempatures.

Where I live in Canada, my Honda dealer not only offers Nitrogen, but recommends it because of our weather paterns.

J
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,421 Posts
When TPMS light comes on, just drive a few miles to get the air warmed-up in your tires thus expanding the air which will cause the TPMS light to go off.
J
That kind of goes against setting the correct pressure with a COLD tire (regardless of season!), not a warmed up one.

We lose a few pounds with temp drops even in sunny CA.
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top