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Discussion Starter #24
I'm not sure what strain of Bermuda Tucson feed stores carry, I think it mostly comes from really hot, low-elevation areas. Our horses act like they're ready for some "new crop" hay, but they're still not missing any meals.
 

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2019 RTL-T Forest Mist Metallic
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I lived on the other end of Tucson, off Catalina highway for many years. It is a beautiful place and I hope to be back there again some day. I think the hay we used to buy came from farms around casa grande, which is even hotter than Tucson, and it was not cheap.
 

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2019 RTL-E (white on beige) in central Texas
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If locally grown the Tuscon Bermudagrass may well be a hybrid variety distinct from our "Coastal" Bermudagrass ("Coastal" being a reference to the Georgia Coastal Plains Experiment Station at Tifton, GA, where that particular hybrid variety was developed by Ag. Scientist Glenn W. Burton back in the 1940's). I suspect ground water retention more than heat bears on it's production.

Noting Tuscon's annual precipitation of ~12" vs our ~24~36" in the Coastal Bermudagrass growing regions of Texas, though the stuff is very drought tolerant (going dormant but surviving and returning to full productive value with no ill effects). Maybe it's grown under irrigation in AZ? In my area of TX with 36" annual average precip, 3-6 cuttings in a good season is not uncommon (we don't irrigate pastures here). Per our Ag Department, "Coastal" is far and away the most popular cultivated hay and grazing grass variety in Texas.

On my 'pasture' pictured in post 14 in late April 2019, no longer being grazed (other than deer) I'm shredding it every 2 weeks in the spring (April through ~June, May being our wettest month), then less frequently as the summer progresses. That 'pasture' hasn't been fertilized since the horses came off it over a decade ago, I like to keep it short for aesthetics and fire-risk management, it keeps the weeds in check, the deer love the tender growth, and the red-tailed hawks I love to watch 'work the pasture' can spot mice easier o_O (y). It goes largely to perennial clover in the winter, which helps fix nitrogen in the soil, the grass overwhelms the clover in the spring.

Everything is in happy balance (the mice are prolific breeders to say the least and they prefer the pasture over nesting in vehicles or gnawing automobile and tractor wiring insulation ;)). As mentioned previously, the trees and relatively small area make baling hay impractical.

There are many hybrid varieties of the versatile species known as Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon).
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I lived on the other end of Tucson, off Catalina highway for many years. It is a beautiful place and I hope to be back there again some day. I think the hay we used to buy came from farms around casa grande, which is even hotter than Tucson, and it was not cheap.
Price per bale varies from $15 to $18 here, I suppose due to good old supply and demand.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
If locally grown the Tuscon Bermudagrass may well be a hybrid variety distinct from our "Coastal" Bermudagrass ("Coastal" being a reference to the Georgia Coastal Plains Experiment Station at Tifton, GA, where that particular hybrid variety was developed by Ag. Scientist Glenn W. Burton back in the 1940's). I suspect ground water retention more than heat bears on it's production.

Noting Tuscon's annual precipitation of ~12" vs our ~24~36" in the Coastal Bermudagrass growing regions of Texas, though the stuff is very drought tolerant (going dormant but surviving and returning to full productive value with no ill effects). Maybe it's grown under irrigation in AZ? In my area of TX with 36" annual average precip, 3-6 cuttings in a good season is not uncommon (we don't irrigate pastures here). Per our Ag Department, "Coastal" is far and away the most popular cultivated hay and grazing grass variety in Texas.

On my 'pasture' pictured in post 14 in late April 2019, no longer being grazed (other than deer) I'm shredding it every 2 weeks in the spring (April through ~June, May being our wettest month), then less frequently as the summer progresses. That 'pasture' hasn't been fertilized since the horses came off it over a decade ago, I like to keep it short for aesthetics and fire-risk management, it keeps the weeds in check, the deer love the tender growth, and the red-tailed hawks I love to watch 'work the pasture' can spot mice easier o_O (y). It goes largely to perennial clover in the winter, which helps fix nitrogen in the soil, the grass overwhelms the clover in the spring.

Everything is in happy balance (the mice are prolific breeders to say the least and they prefer the pasture over nesting in vehicles or gnawing automobile and tractor wiring insulation ;)). As mentioned previously, the trees and relatively small area make baling hay impractical.

There are many hybrid varieties of the versatile species known as Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon).
I don't think many crops make it without irrigation in these parts. It sounds like you've got everything fine-tuned at your place--I'd rather be one of your hawks than your mice.:oops:
 

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Price per bale varies from $15 to $18 here, I suppose due to good old supply and demand.
We pay $9 a bale for Timothy here south of Denver. We get that price by buying truckload quantities. I think a single bale at Murdochs runs about $14.
 

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Sister-In-Law who has a couple of horses tells me Coastal is currently going for $8.75/bale from the barn of a hay-producing neighbor (that's for 50 bales fork-lift loaded on her trailer). Usually $1/bale less if you load it yourself out of the pasture on baling day; likely at least $1.50/bale more at a feed store. This all in central TX / Austin area.

Whew, glad I'm out of horses, I can recall screaming bloody-murder when paying $5/bale out of the barn during drought!

BTW, Timothy is considered an undesirable (but common) invader down here, managed by shredding before it goes to seed in Coastal pastures. We don't see it cultivated much but it does get baled off rough / 'native' pastures for cattle feed. Regional differences are interesting, we live in a hugely varied country!
 
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