Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

21 - 39 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Excellent movie. I found it very informative and very well-paced. I think you made great judgement of exactly what to show and what to skip, which is always difficult in editing a movie.

I just had a driver-side axle problem. The process you show is way, way beyond my capabilities (I have successfully replaced a cabin air-filter once but that's about as far as it goes) but it's very interesting to me to see the take-apart documented so well.

Good luck in your future guides.

b.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Thanks for the video, just did my right side driveshaft (did the left last year), 180k miles, lift-kit since 80k. Had to look closely at the final few seconds to see how to thread a bar through the exhaust to tap it out. To snap the new one in back in I hung a bungee cord off the strut spring on the outer end to hold it aligned, and then a few taps with a rubber hammer. Oh, and with the lift kit I found it a little easier to crank up some spring compressors on the strut to make a little more room and lessen any chance of the bottom of the strut tearing the boot.

Couldn't find the torque specs in your video or write up.
19mm caliper carrier bolts: 100 ft lbs
24mm strut to knuckle bolts: 150 ft lbs
36mm axle nut 240 ft lbs (your Acura video shows 200, not sure if that was the final torque for that vehicle)
22mm wheel nuts 94 ft lbs. Mine feel kinda ratchety and am wondering if it is a washer to nut issue and if I should lubricate that (not the threads themselves).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Thanks a ton for the video and awesome write-up! I just did half-shafts and struts/stabilizer bars and it rides like a new truck at 100,000 miles :)

I liked your pry bar trick to separate the shaft on the driver's side. My pry bar was too thick, so I took an angle grinder and shaved a bunch off to get it to fit in that narrow space. The passenger side shaft was more tricky. For the passenger side, I ended up using a bunch of 3/8" extensions to make it long enough to hit with a hammer from underneath the truck, and bam it came off.

Once the driver's side was done, the passenger side took about half the time. All-in-all, taking my time on it I spent about 7 hours including replacing the strut assemblies and stabilizer bars.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,566 Posts
Thanks a ton for the video and awesome write-up! I just did half-shafts and struts/stabilizer bars and it rides like a new truck at 100,000 miles :)

I liked your pry bar trick to separate the shaft on the driver's side. My pry bar was too thick, so I took an angle grinder and shaved a bunch off to get it to fit in that narrow space. The passenger side shaft was more tricky. For the passenger side, I ended up using a bunch of 3/8" extensions to make it long enough to hit with a hammer from underneath the truck, and bam it came off.

Once the driver's side was done, the passenger side took about half the time. All-in-all, taking my time on it I spent about 7 hours including replacing the strut assemblies and stabilizer bars.
Did you use OEM parts for the axles and the strut assemblies? If not what brand did you use and why?
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Did you use OEM parts for the axles and the strut assemblies? If not what brand did you use and why?
Thanks!
Wanted to use OEM (I try to whenever I can) but in this instance OEM were astronomically more expensive.

Strut assemblies preassembled were a little difficult to locate. I was lazy and didn't want to add time to my repair by disassembling the onld ones and installing new struts in the old housings. I ended up buying them from 1aauto.com for $180 for both driver and passenger, preloaded, ready to install. I took a gamble on these, they are made in China. They were really easy to install and the truck rides great with them installed but we will see how long they last. I'm guessing they won't give me 93,000 miles like the original struts did, but realistically I won't be putting on another 93,000 miles

https://www.1aauto.com/2006-14-honda-ridgeline-strut-and-spring-assembly-pair/i/1assp01159?f=1052818&y=2006

The half shafts came from Napa, brand new not re-manufactured Napa Max Drive, Lifetime warranty for $89 each, so $180 for both driver and passenger side. These are made in the USA, and look to be really good quality. Got them from Napa as they are the closest to my house and offer a military discount $

I also did inner/outer tie rods at the same time as long as the front end was torn apart, those were OEM Honda, decently priced. Got those from Hondapartsnow.com

I hope that helps, and if you have any other questions feel free to ask!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Thanks, Lily, for the video. It really helped; I used your method but did not remove the rotor. What did NOT help was the lift kit. It turned a 30 minute job into a 3 hour job. As a result I could only get the left side done.

For anyone who hasn't done this, with a strut spacer lift installed, the strut is not fully extended when the weight is taken off the suspension. When I removed the strut to steering knuckle bolts, the strut extended at least an inch; enough to dig into the axle boot. The lower arm can be forced down to make clearance but makes working extremely difficult.

When I go back and do the right side, I'll put a spring compressor on the strut before removing the strut bolts, probably even with a little compression load to keep it more out of the way.

...with the lift kit I found it a little easier to crank up some spring compressors on the strut to make a little more room and lessen any chance of the bottom of the strut tearing the boot...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Wanted to chime in here. I just got done replacing the front passenger/right axle on my 2007 Ridgeline two days ago. It was a nightmare. Exact opposite experience from the video where everything goes nice and easy. Here's what I learned.

My passenger/right front axle was throwing grease from the inner/inboard boot. Small amounts of grease were leaking out from under the the larger/inner seal band. An interesting note is that my serpentine belt had fallen off twice while doing U-turns at the same physical location in the previous six months. Now I know why; small amounts of grease was getting thrown onto the pulley wheels.

I was also hearing a strange metal knocking sound when steering. I thought it might possibly be the CV joint since I already knew it was leaking grease, but I wasn't sure. It was a knocking sound only on momentum change when the steering wheel/wheels were near center. This made me think it was more likely a suspension issue, and my lower swing arm bushings (the vertical bushings) were visibly torn on both sides. However, I now know it was the three CV joint rollers knocking against the inside of the CV joint cup because the sound has gone away now that I replaced the axle. More on this later.

I decided to take the axle out to inspect it and figure out what to do. I didn't plan to immediately repair or replace it and don't have replacement parts yet. I've done axle replacements before, so I feel fairly confident about what I'm doing.

I borrowed my neighbor's manual impact driver kit to get the two Phillips screws out of the rotor. Ended up shattering the Philips tip on the second screw and had to drill it out. Gotta buy the neighbor a new bit set. Wasted two hours.

When it comes time to push out the axle from the hub, it won't budge. The area where I can see the axle splines doesn't look corroded or anything and the wheel is in pretty good shape.

At some point in here I manage to squish my pinky finger and the whole thing goes purple behind the nail. Hours later it's super painful and I have to drill a hole in the nail to relieve the pressure. Pretty sure that nail will fall off here in the next few weeks.

I make the mistake of whacking the end of the axle a couple of times with my 2-pound steel hammer in an attempt to get it out. I didn't realize it until later, but I've deformed the axle end. Axle won't budge.

LESSON LEARNED; Never hit the end of an axle with a metal hammer. You will bloom it and destroy the threading. Use a rubber mallet or go straight to a puller unless you are ready to re-thread or junk the old axle.

I spend like three hours trying to get the axle out of the hub. Give up, go to put the axle nut back on. About half way into spinning the nut on with my drill it seizes up. Dead animals fall from the sky and the sun goes dark.

I realize what I've done and I back off the nut. I know it's off-thread at this point and that I'm going to break something no matter which direction I go. I take my 4-foot breaker bar and decide to crank the nut off, hoping it takes most of the damage and that I can just get a new nut.

The nut is completely destroyed. Looking into is like being goatse'd.

I start looking at the axle end and realize it's been deformed. I still don't understand how, because I didn't hit it that hard, but apparently it was enough. At this point I don't have a spare axle nut, I can't get the axle out, and I can't file-out or re-thread the axle end. I cry myself to sleep.

The next day I borrow my neighbor's car and go to Autozone. I rent a puller and buy a new axle nut.

Upon returning to the crater of despair, I discover that neither the puller nor nut fit.

This part is important. It turns out that out of all the auto parts stores in the area (Autozone, O'Reilly, and Napa), NONE of them seem to have the right axle nut in their system or in stock. It's actually a M26-1.5 (36mm socket), but most of them wrongly think it's supposed to be an M24. This is Honda part number 90305-S3V-A11. It's the same nut that goes on every damned CRV and Accord from 2008 to 2016, plus a whole load of other vehicles/models. WTF. I can't get the nut anywhere. Local Honda dealer has no stock (ultimo WTF).

I go back to Autozone and return everything. I get some PB Blaster and rent a 7-ton puller.

I spent the rest of the day spraying PB Blaster into the spines and cranking down on the puller to no effect. I start to question reality at point because it makes no sense how much pressure I've put onto this puller. I've got a 4-foot steel gas pipe on the end of my socket wrench cranking as hard as I can. I'm worried about shattering the wrench.

I spend the last hour of the day with a hot-glue gun and the end of a plastic drink bottle making a little half-cup on the end of the axle/hub so that I can leave the PB Blaster liquid soaking into the axle splines over night with the puller cranked all the way down.

The next day I come out and it doesn't look like any of the liquid has soaked in. At this point I'm about to give up.

I back the puller off, make sure everything is perfect, and re-assemble it so that I can give it a final effort. I crank the puller down with my massive 4-foot breaker bar on the end of my breaker wrench. I'm putting so my pressure on the puller that it's basically drilling into the end of the axle now. I'm putting all of my body weight down onto this bar and it's stopped.

I take my 2-pound hammer and tap on the end of the puller 20 times and then crank down the puller a tiny bit more. At this point I'm scared that the puller is going to break and something will go flying and I'm going to seriously hurt myself. I do this crank and tap process about three times and finally the axle gives up by producing an incredibly loud metal pang/crack sound. Nearly piss myself because I was right next to it holding the puller with one hand and tapping with the hammer.

So at this point I just start cranking down on the puller. I know it must be bad in there because the whole way out is a struggle even with that massive breaker bar.

When I finally get the axle out, it looks like this


The weird part is that about 1/4 the of the axle spine surface which you don't see here looks perfectly new, while the other 3/4ths is corroded. I know where this truck has been. I don't know how this would happen.

I spend another two hours getting the inboard side of the axle out because it's a huge pain. A slide hammer would have probably done it but didn't have access to one at the time. I end up unbolting the front exhaust system so that I can tap-out the inboard axle connection from the intermediate axle shaft, then put the exhaust back on. I've read from other people that they could tap it out by sticking a bar in there but I didn't have anything long enough to quite fit. In retrospect, I should have cut a wood dowel to do it.

Upon inspecting the axle, I found that the inboard boot actually had quite a lot of grease still in it. I never inspected the inside of the cup but probably should have. Apparently the knocking sound was from the three rollers hitting the inside of the joint cup on momentum changes.

I then spent awhile fixing the threads on the end of the axle so that I could stick a new nut on it. Later I borrow my neighbor's car again and took the whole thing over to a Napa to get a new boot, grease, and clamps. I also make a second attempt to get a new nut.

The Napa guy was kinda... slow. To his defense, I'm looking at him check their system to find a new nut and boot kit and they just have nothing. This is a HUGE Napa location for the city I'm in. Eventually I just give up and get a whole new re-manufactured axle for $75. I've wasted a ton of time already and just want this over and done with.

So I take my new axle back home and start putting it in....

The new nut that came with the new axle doesn't fit my hub. It's too wide at the base/flange.

And now it's too late and Napa is closed for the day. KILL ME ALREADY.

Day three/four or whatever...

So now I still need a new axle nut and nobody seems to have one.

After a lot of thinking and googling I call a nearby Accura dealer and they have a nut. It's normally a $6 part but I gotta pay the Accura price for it; $14.

It takes maybe three hours to re-assemble everything and clean up. My long nightmare is finally over. I'm sunburned, tired, both pinky fingers smashed, everything is dirty, my feet stink, my eyelids are itchy, and I'm hungry. I drive the truck out to return the rental puller to Autozone and stop by Taco Bell. Their ice machine is out of order. It's like 100F outside. The guy at the checkout window asks, "Are you okay?"
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,797 Posts
Wanted to chime in here. I just got done replacing the front passenger/right axle on my 2007 Ridgeline two days ago. It was a nightmare. Exact opposite experience from the video where everything goes nice and easy. Here's what I learned.

My passenger/right front axle was throwing grease from the inner/inboard boot. Small amounts of grease were leaking out from under the the larger/inner seal band. An interesting note is that my serpentine belt had fallen off twice while doing U-turns at the same physical location in the previous six months. Now I know why; small amounts of grease was getting thrown onto the pulley wheels.

I was also hearing a strange metal knocking sound when steering. I thought it might possibly be the CV joint since I already knew it was leaking grease, but I wasn't sure. It was a knocking sound only on momentum change when the steering wheel/wheels were near center. This made me think it was more likely a suspension issue, and my lower swing arm bushings (the vertical bushings) were visibly torn on both sides. However, I now know it was the three CV joint rollers knocking against the inside of the CV joint cup because the sound has gone away now that I replaced the axle. More on this later.

I decided to take the axle out to inspect it and figure out what to do. I didn't plan to immediately repair or replace it and don't have replacement parts yet. I've done axle replacements before, so I feel fairly confident about what I'm doing.

I borrowed my neighbor's manual impact driver kit to get the two Phillips screws out of the rotor. Ended up shattering the Philips tip on the second screw and had to drill it out. Gotta buy the neighbor a new bit set. Wasted two hours.

When it comes time to push out the axle from the hub, it won't budge. The area where I can see the axle splines doesn't look corroded or anything and the wheel is in pretty good shape.

At some point in here I manage to squish my pinky finger and the whole thing goes purple behind the nail. Hours later it's super painful and I have to drill a hole in the nail to relieve the pressure. Pretty sure that nail will fall off here in the next few weeks.

I make the mistake of whacking the end of the axle a couple of times with my 2-pound steel hammer in an attempt to get it out. I didn't realize it until later, but I've deformed the axle end. Axle won't budge.

LESSON LEARNED; Never hit the end of an axle with a metal hammer. You will bloom it and destroy the threading. Use a rubber mallet or go straight to a puller unless you are ready to re-thread or junk the old axle.

I spend like three hours trying to get the axle out of the hub. Give up, go to put the axle nut back on. About half way into spinning the nut on with my drill it seizes up. Dead animals fall from the sky and the sun goes dark.

I realize what I've done and I back off the nut. I know it's off-thread at this point and that I'm going to break something no matter which direction I go. I take my 4-foot breaker bar and decide to crank the nut off, hoping it takes most of the damage and that I can just get a new nut.

The nut is completely destroyed. Looking into is like being goatse'd.

I start looking at the axle end and realize it's been deformed. I still don't understand how, because I didn't hit it that hard, but apparently it was enough. At this point I don't have a spare axle nut, I can't get the axle out, and I can't file-out or re-thread the axle end. I cry myself to sleep.

The next day I borrow my neighbor's car and go to Autozone. I rent a puller and buy a new axle nut.

Upon returning to the crater of despair, I discover that neither the puller nor nut fit.

This part is important. It turns out that out of all the auto parts stores in the area (Autozone, O'Reilly, and Napa), NONE of them seem to have the right axle nut in their system or in stock. It's actually a M26-1.5 (36mm socket), but most of them wrongly think it's supposed to be an M24. This is Honda part number 90305-S3V-A11. It's the same nut that goes on every damned CRV and Accord from 2008 to 2016, plus a whole load of other vehicles/models. WTF. I can't get the nut anywhere. Local Honda dealer has no stock (ultimo WTF).

I go back to Autozone and return everything. I get some PB Blaster and rent a 7-ton puller.

I spent the rest of the day spraying PB Blaster into the spines and cranking down on the puller to no effect. I start to question reality at point because it makes no sense how much pressure I've put onto this puller. I've got a 4-foot steel gas pipe on the end of my socket wrench cranking as hard as I can. I'm worried about shattering the wrench.

I spend the last hour of the day with a hot-glue gun and the end of a plastic drink bottle making a little half-cup on the end of the axle/hub so that I can leave the PB Blaster liquid soaking into the axle splines over night with the puller cranked all the way down.

The next day I come out and it doesn't look like any of the liquid has soaked in. At this point I'm about to give up.

I back the puller off, make sure everything is perfect, and re-assemble it so that I can give it a final effort. I crank the puller down with my massive 4-foot breaker bar on the end of my breaker wrench. I'm putting so my pressure on the puller that it's basically drilling into the end of the axle now. I'm putting all of my body weight down onto this bar and it's stopped.

I take my 2-pound hammer and tap on the end of the puller 20 times and then crank down the puller a tiny bit more. At this point I'm scared that the puller is going to break and something will go flying and I'm going to seriously hurt myself. I do this crank and tap process about three times and finally the axle gives up by producing an incredibly loud metal pang/crack sound. Nearly piss myself because I was right next to it holding the puller with one hand and tapping with the hammer.

So at this point I just start cranking down on the puller. I know it must be bad in there because the whole way out is a struggle even with that massive breaker bar.

When I finally get the axle out, it looks like this


The weird part is that about 1/4 the of the axle spine surface which you don't see here looks perfectly new, while the other 3/4ths is corroded. I know where this truck has been. I don't know how this would happen.

I spend another two hours getting the inboard side of the axle out because it's a huge pain. A slide hammer would have probably done it but didn't have access to one at the time. I end up unbolting the front exhaust system so that I can tap-out the inboard axle connection from the intermediate axle shaft, then put the exhaust back on. I've read from other people that they could tap it out by sticking a bar in there but I didn't have anything long enough to quite fit. In retrospect, I should have cut a wood dowel to do it.

Upon inspecting the axle, I found that the inboard boot actually had quite a lot of grease still in it. I never inspected the inside of the cup but probably should have. Apparently the knocking sound was from the three rollers hitting the inside of the joint cup on momentum changes.

I then spent awhile fixing the threads on the end of the axle so that I could stick a new nut on it. Later I borrow my neighbor's car again and took the whole thing over to a Napa to get a new boot, grease, and clamps. I also make a second attempt to get a new nut.

The Napa guy was kinda... slow. To his defense, I'm looking at him check their system to find a new nut and boot kit and they just have nothing. This is a HUGE Napa location for the city I'm in. Eventually I just give up and get a whole new re-manufactured axle for $75. I've wasted a ton of time already and just want this over and done with.

So I take my new axle back home and start putting it in....

The new nut that came with the new axle doesn't fit my hub. It's too wide at the base/flange.

And now it's too late and Napa is closed for the day. KILL ME ALREADY.

Day three/four or whatever...

So now I still need a new axle nut and nobody seems to have one.

After a lot of thinking and googling I call a nearby Acura dealer and they have a nut. It's normally a $6 part but I gotta pay the Acura price for it; $14.

It takes maybe three hours to re-assemble everything and clean up. My long nightmare is finally over. I'm sunburned, tired, both pinky fingers smashed, everything is dirty, my feet stink, my eyelids are itchy, and I'm hungry. I drive the truck out to return the rental puller to Autozone and stop by Taco Bell. Their ice machine is out of order. It's like 100F outside. The guy at the checkout window asks, "Are you okay?"
This sounds like the "fiasco" to change the Struts 7-10 years ago on my Del Sol or my axle on my Civic, where I ended up cracking the transmission case. I'm just letting my CV axle's leak and when they die, I drop it at a Junk Yard. ;)

So you ended up with Purple Pinkie's to match your thumbs. :grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,566 Posts
Carsmak,

Can you sticky this thread? For some reason older threads in the 1G Mods, Installs section disappear, at least on my computer. This one is worth keeping up in the stickies IMHO.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts


Help !! I’m having similar issues as another member here !

Working on the passenger front axle and everything going smoothly until ....

I’ve tried everything pry bars etc.. what the best method here or some sort of puller tool maybe ?

Any advice is appreciated!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,566 Posts
Oh oh,

Did you pull apart the intermediate shaft or is it my imagination?. . . .You separate the axle from the intermediate shaft which stays attached to the transmission . . .

In my experience the passenger side axle removal required some persuasion with a long screwdriver and a hammer to hit it. Its been a while but I recall that I approached it from underneath and put the long screwdriver on the flange of the axle (not the intermediate shaft) and then whacked the long screwdriver (towards the passenger side) until the axle popped off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Oh oh,



Did you pull apart the intermediate shaft or is it my imagination?. . . .You separate the axle from the intermediate shaft which stays attached to the transmission . . .



In my experience the passenger side axle removal required some persuasion with a long screwdriver and a hammer to hit it. Its been a while but I recall that I approached it from underneath and put the long screwdriver on the flange of the axle (not the intermediate shaft) and then whacked the long screwdriver (towards the passenger side) until the axle popped off.


Got it off was a Payne in the ass but . Came undone! ..




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Thanks for the guide. After doing some research on OEM or aftermarket. I decided that I will go with NAPA. They seem to be good quality for a very good price.

https://www.acura-legend.com/vbulletin/f4/cv-axles-buy-145689/

They also have new and reman ones, not sure which one to get though.

Reman ones have core price and new ones do not. So reman cost $145 each, but you get $70 back after returning old axles, new ones $90 each with no core return option. So which is one is better then? I read somewhere that reman mostly use oem shaft or some oem parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Has anyone used the Passenger NAPA one (the Shaft that goes into the Transmission slot is short, and when I took off the Dust cover, and put it on the NAPA one the the saft sun behind, and didnt Pertrude like the OEM I took off did. I put it on and pushed and tried to get it on with the dust sheild and couldnt, take it off, and with some nice hand push force it clicks right in. Thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Having a hard time getting the new axle into the transmission on the drivers side. It looks like it pops right in on the video. Any tricks to get it to slide into the gear?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,566 Posts
It is made so that there is a clip that helps to lock the the axle in place. You need to push a bit to get it past the clip and locked in place. It will take some effort but not a huge amount. If it won't push into place then you should check for something obstructing the process or something wrong with the new axle. Is it OEM or aftermarket? Compare new part to old part . . .
 
21 - 39 of 39 Posts
Top