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Discussion Starter #1
Well I guess it's time to start looking for a replacement for my 2012 G1 Ridgeline. Always had Honda's since I'm 16 (now 46!).

Was hoping to get the 2021 G2 Ridgeline. I have a really good relationship with my dealer in the Montreal area.

Just facing a big dilemma......we bought a boat this year. I know that with the trailer + boat, the gross weight must be around 5400 lbs. I understand this is about 8% above the recommended max towable for the Ridgeline (5000lbs). Tongue weight is probably close to 450-500lbs so no big issue there.

I'm now wondering if I should go for a pick-up that can tow a bit more than the max 5000 lbs of the Ridge. I know I can find something in the 6500-7000lbs range for the same pick-up size. ( Tacoma or Ranger ).

I've been reading the thread about the new ZF 9-speed transmission and that's where my concerns comes from....

I only need to tow the boat a couple times per year (around 4-5 times) but it's a hilly road in the Northern Laurentians.

Definitely not going to be my first choice to break apart from Honda if it comes to that point.....
 

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2020 RTL-E (Modern Steel Metallic), 2013 RTL (Dark Cherry Pearl)
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Sounds like a half ton would be better suited for your towing needs. I moved from a RAM 1500 to a 2020 RTL-E as I went from 2 cars to one and this is a great all around vehicle especially since I tow only twice a year. Your boat would be considerably heavier and even though a Ranger or Tacoma could tow it, I'd be nervous about the tail wagging the dog. Our trailer is around 3800 lbs dry, but even at that weight I know it will be a workout for the Honda, Funny you are concerned about the ZF 9 speed as that is why I chose the 2020 over earlier years; I wanted gear selection and elimination of gear hunting.
 

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2019 Honda Ridgeline Black Edition
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What’s the tow distance, if it’s only a few times a year I wouldn’t let that keep me from getting what I want. Just be smart when towing it. Obviously it’s not going to be the RL’s favorite thing to tow. However manufacturers always put a healthy margarine 🧈 of error (hehe) margarine... anyways. Yeah so, be smart and careful and get yourself another Honda. People buy full-size trucks all the time and either never use them or use them so few times that it’s hard to justify it and you are forced to settle for something that wasn’t ideal because of it. Both the RL and the pilot are rated for 5000# in AWD versions however the RL has beefier components to deal with more regular towing. I will probably get a lot of flak for my recommendation here but hey I load $70 million dollar aircrafts for a living and I am well versed on limitations and when and when not to exceed them.
 

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What is your towing experience?

I expect the 2020+ G2 to stand up better to towing than the earlier G2 trims, because the ZF9 trans is more stout.

Nobody outside of Honda knows what the weakest link is in the Ridgeline's towing arena. In most cases, it is heat management, either for the engine or the transmission. In the Ridgeline's case, the transverse transmission layout doesn't do any favors with respect to heat management.

You live in a relatively cooler part of the continent, so ambient temps can be your friend. The ZF9 has pretty low gearing in First (which you would likely select with the paddle shifters when starting out with a heavy load). The paddle shifters will also help tremendously in hilly situations.

If you really like the Ridgeline, you might consider going with a ZF9 version, tow wisely, take it easy when towing (55-60mph, whatever that is in kph), change trans fluid twice as often, possibly consider adding an additional trans cooler (there are a couple who have done this in the G2 forum... follow their threads).

If you're going to step up from a Ridgeline, you really need to go full-size, IMO. The Tacoma is rated to tow more than the Ridgeline, but those who have towed over 4k with a Tacoma really do not have good things to say about it. The gap between the Ridgeline and full-size wrt towing is very narrow, being filled by the diesel Coloranyon and maybe the Ranger, albeit in a very small space. The price you pay for the inconveniences outside of towing is high relative to the Ridgeline.

In the end, I'd lean toward the ZF9 G2. You have a warranty period to determine if the truck is going to explode if you go over 5klbs towing. If it makes you nervous, trade up then.

OTOH, if you're a complete newbie to towing, just get the Ram and be done with it! ;)

Hope that makes sense.
 

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If this member is telling the truth, towing 5,400 lbs. should be a piece of cake with your 2012.

He claims to have regularly towed between 5,000 and 8,000 lbs. with at least two (1G) Ridgelines - one with 156K miles and one with 187K - both still running the original transmission and differential fluids.

 

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Not to be a downer, but I’d imagine there could be issues with insurance if there was an accident and you were exceeding capacity. Maybe that’s not a thing but I’d check to be sure. Not a lawyer!
 

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Not to be a downer, but I’d imagine there could be issues with insurance if there was an accident and you were exceeding capacity. Maybe that’s not a thing but I’d check to be sure. Not a lawyer!
That's not a COULD, that's a WILL.

Insurance companies are built off denying claims if possible. Thats the whole point -- approve your clients' biz rules for coverage, and approve nothing more.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you for your comments. Didn't thought about the fact that with the 9 speed you have paddle shifter. I have approx 120 km per drive....so not the end of the world and I usually don't get any faster than 100km/h (60 MPH). Have a few months to think about it......
 

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Thank you for your comments. Didn't thought about the fact that with the 9 speed you have paddle shifter. I have approx 120 km per drive....so not the end of the world and I usually don't get any faster than 100km/h (60 MPH). Have a few months to think about it......
So.........are you gonna tow the boat by itself with nothing else?

Remember, all that feedback assumes you carry NOTHING in that boat and NOTHING else in the truck.

Just be careful man. IMO you shouldnt be buying an RL for this at all and your way-more-expensive-than-an-RL boat will instantly get denied on any insurance claims if something happens. It's not a probability, it's a certainty. Thats how insurance works -- I spent 3 years in claims management (unless Canada differs).. Good luck.

That and full size trucks are the same price as midsize half the time.
 

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Not only do I suggest a full size, I would suggest one with a tow package. Bigger better brakes, transmission cooler and stiffer rear suspension...... 5800 lbs down a flat private road would be OK. 5800 lbs + cargo, on public highways with hills?

imagine worst case scenario.... down gradient, sudden rainstorm, with a dumbass teenager brakechecking in front of you.....

Time for a bigger truck or a smaller boat.
 

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Ahh the towing dilemma continues!

You will find that the limiting factor will be tongue weight capacity with all the "little" trucks. Then there is the lower cargo capacity in these N.A.R.T.'s (Not A Real Truck) so there is no real advantage to jump to one of these. Imagine a 7,000 lbs towing capacity and a 600 lbs tongue capacity, while this may work for your boat, it probably wont work well for a travel trailer. That just doesn't make sense. Also, the smooth ride from the RL is much appreciated even with the trailer attached and much more forgiving on the combo. You should hav a look at the GCW of the rig and see what others have listed. You find that they are pretty close to each other.

If you step up to a 1/2 ton big three truck, you still get a low cargo capacity so now what makes sense is a 3/4 ton or 1 ton to really give you some room to stuff all the people and cargo into the truck and still tow the trailer.

There are many people that have gone over the published values with all sorts of vehicles and they are taking that risk.

The other possible way to do this is to modify the truck to accept a higher load and then get an inspection firm to verify and document the changes and have that added to your insurance documents.

There is a company in Ontario that has been upgrading vehicles to increase their towing ability. If you want to look at this route, contact Andy at CanAmRV or go checkout their website and towing info.

As far as the 9 speed trans, I would have taken that over the 6 speed because of the paddle shifters and being able to select a gear. Right now when pulling our trailer, the 6 speed trans seems to be hunting for a gear on every hill.
 

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If it were me I would definitely go full size. My wife may end up buying a travel trailer in the future. If so I would probably trade my Ridge in on a Tundra.
 

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The Tundra does sound like a good alternative to the half ton Ram's and F150's. Is there an advantage to going with Toyota in this class of trucks over a domestic make?

Then there is the Titan XD with the Cummins that would work too I would think.
 

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2020 Honda Ridgeline RTL-E Pacific Pewter Metallic
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The Tundra does sound like a good alternative to the half ton Ram's and F150's. Is there an advantage to going with Toyota in this class of trucks over a domestic make?

Then there is the Titan XD with the Cummins that would work too I would think.
The Nissan Titan XD with Cummins was discontinued after the 2019 model year. The 2020 Titan XD is only available with the gasoline engine. So if that’s what you’re looking for you’ll have to hope that there are still some sitting on the lots or buy used.
 

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The Tundra does sound like a good alternative to the half ton Ram's and F150's. Is there an advantage to going with Toyota in this class of trucks over a domestic make?

Then there is the Titan XD with the Cummins that would work too I would think.
I think the only thing wrong with the Tundra, other than size, is the abysmal gas mileage.

They seem to be the most reliable full-size truck out there. You rarely hear of any problems with them.
 
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