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There were other seriously marked down ones on CarGurus for the Ram 1500 Classics. But that one i agree was soooooo cheap at $20k it's hard to believe it would be 28,000 off list price! There was a Laramie version that was 58k marked down to 32k. That's just nuts too. All diesel V6's. Just giving them away.

Steve
 

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My first thought is that you did not have the trailer loaded correctly.
I'm no stranger to towing. It was loaded correctly. It was just not a great amount of weight to be behind that truck. Fwiw, the actual vehicle was empty. Just me and a passenger - no cargo at all.

Maybe the trailer brakes werent great (it wasnt my trailer)? It was also several hundred km's over a mountain highway - single lane each each way, lots of fairly severe climbs/decents, with lots of sharp turns.

Point is, just b/c something is rated to tow "x" amount of weight, doesnt meant its a good idea to do it.

The 2WD SuperCrew F-150 XL with the 3.5L EB engine and 6.5' bed is rated to tow up to 13,200 lbs. or nearly three times (2.8 to be exact) its own weight. Now, what were you saying about the tail wagging the dog? ;)
You couldnt pay me to tow 13000# with a 3.5EB F-150. I would want at least a 3/4ton to do that.
 

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One of the big problems in buying any truck that you plan to tow with is the absolute BS of the so called "Towing Capacity". Ironically the Ridgeline is one of the few that actually can safely tow at its max rating. I doubt there are many trucks out there be they mid size, half ton or larger that are capable of real world towing their rated towing capacity. They all simply run out of payload long before they reach their so called TC. I had an interesting chat with a Ram 1500 owner shortly after buying my 2019 Ridgeline. He pointed to his crew cab 4 wheel drive and proudly pronounced it to be a "Real truck" vs my Ridgeline.

I asked him what his towing capacity was and he said 9,000# and I just laughed...

So what is your payload I asked next and he got real sheepish, the door sticker showed it to be 977# {crew cabs and 4 wheel drive are very heavy and while not the only offender Ram's are notorious for light payloads}. For the record my RL's is 1,477#. I explained to him that he needed 13% of a 9,000# trailer for proper tongue weight which would be 1,170# + another 100# for the weight distribution hitch which puts him at 1,270 before he loads anyone or anything into his truck. So if he goes alone and brings absolutely nothing he is 200# over his rated payload.

A lot of trucks not only run out of payload quickly they are often challenged by their max rear axle rating. I'll never tow a TT again but do tow my 10" cargo trailer most of the time when we travel {hauling either my Indian or the Polaris Rzr} max weight of toy and trailer being 2,600# with no issues whatsoever. If I ever wanted to tow a 5,000 GVWR trailer fully loaded I know the Ridgeline would git er done as my tongue weight would be 650 + 100 for the EDH which = 750. Take that off of my payload of 1,477# and I still would have 727# of available payload.

I ran F-150 SCab's for 15 years {2 different trucks} and towed a 5,600# GVWR 22' TT for 5 years all over the west {the trailer was usually right at 5,000# buying me a little extra payload to work with}. Fully loaded I was 3,000# under my max tow rating of 8,600# but had used all but 200# of my 1,426# payload after subtracting the tongue weight, WDH and the Leer shell. I was also under the GCWR by nearly 3,000# but the payload was all but gone when we loaded the truck lightly stowing a lot of gear in the trailer to balance the load and not exceed the RAWR.

Bottom line is that the rated towing capacity of almost any truck is suspect at best and often as worthless and potentially dangerous as "Dry Weights" that salesmen are so happy to quote you when shopping for a trailer.

As always... Opinions and YMMV

:cool:
 

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You are correct. Here's some Flak. Being a loadmaster doesn't qualify you to re-engineer and weigh in ( :) )on truck towing capabilities. One should NEVER tow the actual listed towing capacity of any truck. My rule of thumb is no more than 80% of the listed rating; that is 4,000 pounds. As you aren't using weight distribution hitch, towing an overweight trailer puts you and other drivers on the road with you in danger. Brakes and suspension components aren't designed for it. I see it too often. I work at one of the leading RV dealers and do hitch work all the time. You have to look at GCWR as well as tongue weight. How many passengers? equipment? My suggestion is that if you have a boat, then you should have a friend with a truck or rent one for those few tow jobs. For me, I love my Honda and tow a motorcycle trailer at 2,500 pounds thousands of miles . .. no problem. Now, I am looking at the F-150 as I am looking at over 10,000 pound toy hauler.
Unfortunately your argument is red herring to the point at hand, we weren’t asked to consider tongue load I would hope he would evaluate that when he decides on what to do/purchase. If you think for a second Honda is going to take the liability of placing a tow rating on a vehicle that isn’t actually designed to tow said weight you are sadly mistaken. My reference to my job on a C-130 is relating to the fact that Lockheed Martin is also definitely not going to take the liability of rating an aircraft to hold weight outside of its capacity that would just be unrealistic. A weight distributing hitch might do a lot but just because you are towing at the max capacity of the truck doesn’t mean you NEED one. Otherwise Honda would clearly state that in their owners manual and warnings. Honda employees engineers smarter than you or myself to determine an applicable towing capacity and then even tack on some wiggle room. You saying a truck isn’t designed to tow what the manufacturer says it is designed for is quite frankly a dumb statement and it sounds like you are trying to sell weight distributing hitches 😂. A weight distributing hitch is a case by case basis and not used in every situation. We can agree to disagree on exceeding the tow capacity but to “assume” that a vehicle is not designed to tow “at” its capacity is just asinine.
 

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One of the big problems in buying any truck that you plan to tow with is the absolute BS of the so called "Towing Capacity". Ironically the Ridgeline is one of the few that actually can safely tow at its max rating. I doubt there are many trucks out there be they mid size, half ton or larger that are capable of real world towing their rated towing capacity. They all simply run out of payload long before they reach their so called TC. I had an interesting chat with a Ram 1500 owner shortly after buying my 2019 Ridgeline. He pointed to his crew cab 4 wheel drive and proudly pronounced it to be a "Real truck" vs my Ridgeline.

I asked him what his towing capacity was and he said 9,000# and I just laughed...

So what is your payload I asked next and he got real sheepish, the door sticker showed it to be 977# {crew cabs and 4 wheel drive are very heavy and while not the only offender Ram's are notorious for light payloads}. For the record my RL's is 1,477#. I explained to him that he needed 13% of a 9,000# trailer for proper tongue weight which would be 1,170# + another 100# for the weight distribution hitch which puts him at 1,270 before he loads anyone or anything into his truck. So if he goes alone and brings absolutely nothing he is 200# over his rated payload.

A lot of trucks not only run out of payload quickly they are often challenged by their max rear axle rating. I'll never tow a TT again but do tow my 10" cargo trailer most of the time when we travel {hauling either my Indian or the Polaris Rzr} max weight of toy and trailer being 2,600# with no issues whatsoever. If I ever wanted to tow a 5,000 GVWR trailer fully loaded I know the Ridgeline would git er done as my tongue weight would be 650 + 100 for the EDH which = 750. Take that off of my payload of 1,477# and I still would have 727# of available payload.

I ran F-150 SCab's for 15 years {2 different trucks} and towed a 5,600# GVWR 22' TT for 5 years all over the west {the trailer was usually right at 5,000# buying me a little extra payload to work with}. Fully loaded I was 3,000# under my max tow rating of 8,600# but had used all but 200# of my 1,426# payload after subtracting the tongue weight, WDH and the Leer shell. I was also under the GCWR by nearly 3,000# but the payload was all but gone when we loaded the truck lightly stowing a lot of gear in the trailer to balance the load and not exceed the RAWR.

Bottom line is that the rated towing capacity of almost any truck is suspect at best and often as worthless and potentially dangerous as "Dry Weights" that salesmen are so happy to quote you when shopping for a trailer.

As always... Opinions and YMMV

:cool:
I agree, most "real truck" owners are clueless, LOL I love educating them as well. I have worked my Non real truck harder and more often than all these Pavement Princess's
 

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From the Owner's Manual, pg 406, the 5000# tow limit is rated on 2, 150# adults, each with 15# of gear in the truck - nothing else.

So, 5000# is max when there is 330# in the truck. Anything above that, needs to be subtracted from the max tow limit.

I dont know how Honda arrives at 150# for a grown adult, as I'm 5'10" and 185#, and I'm a pretty avg build. As an example, my last road trip, we had ~500# in people (2 adults, 2 kids), ~100# for our dog and his kennel, ~100# in trolling batteries, and another ~200# in food. That's ~900# in the vehicle.

If we take that 900#, subtract the default 330#, that gives 570#. That would give me a max tow of 4430# to start with.

To come full circle, the OP needs to calculate based on how the truck will be loaded when towing, b/c he wants to tow 5400#. Anything over 330# in the truck gets him way too far from that 5400#, let alone 5000#.
 

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From the Owner's Manual, pg 406, the 5000# tow limit is rated on 2, 150# adults, each with 15# of gear in the truck - nothing else.

So, 5000# is max when there is 330# in the truck. Anything above that, needs to be subtracted from the max tow limit.
I'm sure that's the calculation that many (if not most) pickup truck drivers/towers don't consider.
 

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No, my kids are getting bigger & now bringing friends along. That's why we rented 6 different campers last summer, to figure out what we want.
I guess I don't get your logic. . . You want a camper big enough to handle the family and friends but you want a Ranger with a serioulsy cramped rear seating area (it also doesn't convert to open storage anywhere near as effectively as the Ridgeline does)? Where is everyone going to sit and will they be comfortable? . . .IMHO you need a full size to comfortablly tow the trailer you want. The full size will have more rear seat room too for your growing kids. Sounds like that means keeping it on the street or getting a bigger garage. If you have driveway space, a carport canopy could work. Have fun!
 

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I guess I don't get your logic. . . You want a camper big enough to handle the family and friends but you want a Ranger with a serioulsy cramped rear seating area (it also doesn't convert to open storage anywhere near as effectively as the Ridgeline does)? Where is everyone going to sit and will they be comfortable? . . .IMHO you need a full size to comfortablly tow the trailer you want. The full size will have more rear seat room too for your growing kids. Sounds like that means keeping it on the street or getting a bigger garage. If you have driveway space, a carport canopy could work. Have fun!
We camp 6 times/ year tops. This year Covid, so backyard tent camping only.
I want a compact truck with a smooth ride to drive 94% of the time, but able to tow the camper that I want when needed, legally.
 

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We are camping more now probably a least 10 times this year. We are planning a long 2 week trip all over southern BC. Lots of driving and hilly roads.

I have no problem with the RL and we are towing near the max. I do really appreciate the WDH which levels the rig out and makes if feel much more controlled.
 

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We camp 6 times/ year tops. This year Covid, so backyard tent camping only.
I want a compact truck with a smooth ride to drive 94% of the time, but able to tow the camper that I want when needed, legally.
Legally, you need a smaller trailer or a full-size truck. Full stop. You cannot tow a 6200# trailer with gear, plus kids and their friends with a RL. You need to figure payload against towing. If you sat down and worked it out, I highly doubt any mid-size will fit the bill.

I was in your position too. We are an outdoor family of 4, and we camp/fish a lot. A Tundra CrewMax is really what I wanted, but I'm not driving a beast like that as my commuter vehicle for the 5 weeks a year we're road trippin'.

So, I came down to a RL, which is actually ideal, but I will have to live with either a large tent trailer, or a 19' (max) RV trailer if I want to lug our lodgings around with us. We decided that the boat is the most fun, so we have a gigantic tent and a huge pop-up shelter instead.

If you want the big-assed RV trailer + family and the kids' friends, you need a big-assed tow vehicle. Read my post above - #128.
 
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