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I need to freshen up again on this for our Honda's.
I've helped so many friends with their different makers vehicles and some are set up to cancel some functions if they have a TPMS issue.
 

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drivetheridge. The rad in behind the oil filter is the old rad. Best as I can tell the denso is the same. I didn't count tubes.

Here are some better pics.





Maybe I will count tubes on my old one when I am back in my garage. That being said, I don't think you can simply count tubes or fin density and conclude that one rejects heat better than the other.

To purge my tranny I did a flush using the engine turning the pump. I was pouring new DW1 into the fill hole as dirty stuff was coming out of one of the cooler pipes. Wife was working the gears in the cab. To swap my coolant I did an okay job as it wasn't contaminated and I didn't care that much. I broke the drain nipple on the block so that complicated things. Basically I just went into the thermostat housing, I gently blew compressed air into whatever holes I could find and coolant came out the others. I used some Zerex Asian Blue because it was on sale. Fun fact, the red and blue are exactly the same, just a different dye. Both are POATs I believe.
Appreciate the additional pictures. The rad you got must be Denso p/n 2213249. That also looks less dense than the OEM version (photo below, I've been trying to find out specs from Denso) but it does look better than the Reach brand.
Here are some fun facts just gathered (to save you the trouble o_O). Referencing against the attached (page 7) for the Reach/NAPA brand, I recounted/measured) my OEM Denso and it has 124 tubes vs. 37 (70% less!) and 125 fins vs. 38 (another 70% less!) and a fin pitch of ~2.62mm vs. 3.00mm (smaller difference). Were I to crunch more numbers the surface area difference would be quite large! The Reach brand is comparing theirs to "Company A" which I surmise is just another aftermarket brand. (Comparing to OEM Denso would defeat their purpose!). In thermodynamics surface area rules. Nice thing about more fins is if some get bent/damaged the corresponding reduction in cooling capacity
Automotive radiator part Black Rectangle Grille Wood

is also reduced. And I agree, I could go OEM if I really want OEM density, just wish that had the two-nut design. Ironically, Honda may have over-engineered for cooling efficiency, but not for fitting longevity!

I also noticed the two Zerex brands, the red with Valvoline also on the label, the blue just Zerex; the red does not show Honda-compatible as the blue shows. That's all so very confusing and contradictory if they are both POATs like the OEM fluid. I read up on the additives a bit and what concerns me (a tiny bit) is... does the rad manufacturer use lead or lead-free in the assembly? (I don't trust China!) All the various additives are for anti-corrosion, elastomeric seal protection, etc., thus matching what the OEM recommends becomes more important. But if we're now using aftermarket radiators that becomes a variable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Honda OEM coolant is available and not that much more than FLAPS stuff if you are worried about additives. here is a cool and useful chart for all the different coolant types and some colours. colours. As for the Denso rad I got, it was made in Indonesia, not China.

I finally got all my locks to work with my keys!

Got my drive shaft ordered! Got it from Auto Truck Parts based in QC. Ordered it last night and Mo (owner/operator?) called me to confirm everything. Called me 3 times actually, super nice guy. $612 CAD taxes and shipping. Pretty decent if you ask me. In the mean time the old one is back in, I need to drive over 25mph to get to work, stores, anywhere else in down but I really appreciate AWD with the weather these days.
 
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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
Finally made it in to get it's provincial inspection. FAIL. 1 brake light, 1 front broken spring, and 1 front pad / rotor is no good.

My options are to either get complete new strut assemblies from rockauto (FCS brand?) or get new springs from Honda and keep whatever struts are on their now which may be original. I'm leaning towards getting new assemblies.

As for brakes, well, I have MDX calipers in the mail and they should get here in a week or so. Problem is I ordered EDC brakes/rotos but they are on back order. I don't think they will be here for a while. I think I am going to have to cancel that order and just live with some new 'powerstop' rotors/pads.

Anyone got any thoughts/ideas. I have a bit of time seeing as I have to do some traveling. I won't be able to go up for inspection for another 3 weeks I think.
 

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Given your mechanical abilities, I would not go with a complete strut assembly (unless you want to spend for OEM). There have simply been too many reports of issues with aftermarket strut assemblies most of which seem to revolve around the upper strut bearing. Normally I would say to keep the original strut body and spring and, replace the upper bearing with new OEM, replace the cartridge insert with decent (hopefully) aftermarket KYB and also use aftermarket for the rest of the rubber bits etc. Spring compressor will obviously be required. In your case with the broken spring I'm not sure how I would go but I would definitely replace both springs to match.
 

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If you dig into the rear suspension, there is a TSB on the bump stops.
I'd inspect new ones also if you go that route.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
I think my current options are to:
  1. Get OEM springs and put them onto whatever struts I have. Pro is I keep OEM spring rate, con is that chances are those struts and mounts are probably soon due for replacement. ($230)
  2. Get complete after market assemblies. Pro is all new and shouldn't need replacement, con is that the mounts may make noise and the spring rate might not be right. ($300 for FCS)
  3. Get OEM springs, get after market strut inserts, either reuse or new strut mounts. Pro it is probably a better result than 1 or 2. con is it's getting pretty expensive (650 for KYBs)
  4. Get complete OEM assemblies. Pro is best guaranteed result, con is it is the most expensive option ($750)

It's a tough call but I also have to remind myself that this is just a winter truck and not a 100K track car. All options will be both safe and reliable. That's why I am leaning towards #2. I do have access to a a big boy (the non-decapitating kind) spring compressor for free so that's nice. And yes, everything will be done in pairs.

Edit: As for the rear suspension. Good to know about that TSB, I'm hoping I won't have to touch the rear.
 
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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
My $4.29USD sway bar links came in the mail. You know what? They're not bad. I like the fact they have a flat on the side. Should make removal easier if I ever have to take something apart. Right now the only way I can get the current ones off is a reciprocating saw.

 

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Discussion Starter · #69 · (Edited)
Update. New drive shaft installed. Vibs are gone.

I also measure my pads and rotors. They are within spec. I believe min for front rotors is 26mm and mine are 27.5mm. Provincial Vehicle Reference Manual calls for min 1.6mm pad thickness for bonded pads and mine are at least 4.5mm. I think I am going to have to pick a fight with tech who failed me for brakes. Not impressed.

Awaiting on struts now.

I also installed my review mirror camera / back up camera combo unit. Works okay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
My MDX brakes came in the mail today. Got bored this evening and decided to rebuild them.

Texas brakes, I love it. No rust what so ever.


Parts to go into them. I always get extra seals and boots in case I damage one during instal.


I would have loved to keep the OE slider pins as their anti rust coating is probably better than whatever I got unfortunately someone did a number on one or two of them trying to pry them out at one point.


A bit of filing on where the hardware sits. Helps the pads slide freely.


This is how you get the pistons out. Keep your fingers away. The goal is to get them to extend as far as possible without breaking the seal. If one of them goes too far, the seal will break, and all the compressed air will escape. The other won't extend.


Video one
Video two



End result. If you're going to do this I recommend you only do one at a time start to finish. It's nice to have an example of how exactly each seal sits. Keep your old stuff until your done. Especially your metal clips, the replacements may not be off in size.


Texas. No rust pitting. Makes life easy.


An ultrasonic bath and bit of polishing later.


Insides look nice. If you wanted to paint, sand blast, or powder coat your brakes this would be the time to do. If you powder coater is bored and looking for a challenge tell him to make your brakes look like this. I really want that on one of my cars.


All done.



This took longer than expected as I had issues with the seals and the pistons weren't going in smoothly at first. I still haven't put the metal clips in. I'll try again in the morning or just not bother. As well, if you are going to clean this up with a brush or wire wheel please wear appropriate PPE. Brake dust is no joke. I have a 3M half mask with a few different filters (dust, VOC). That thing is wonderful and comfortable. Highly recommended.

Why you would do this instead of just buying remanufactured calipers? Well, maybe you don't trust some of the calipers out there, maybe you enjoy doing stuff on your own. Maybe you are cheap; for me a reman caliper is about $200 shipped to my door, a seal kit is $4. I actually bought 2 calipers on ebay shipped to my door for $150 cad. (Thanks ebay global shipping program!), seal kits were cheap to add onto one my my Rock Auto purchases. That being said, if you are going to do this just to save money you're probably going to be miserable.
 

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Nice work and good write up. I have have a set of MDX Cardone rebuilts on my 14. They were the more deluxe version that comes coated. The jury is still out the rebuilds; passenger side brake pads (EBC yellowstuff) wore out WAY before the drive's side. I found no smoking gun to explain the difference and I noticed no braking performance issues prior to discovering the quick wear. I need to check again to see how the more conventional brake pads are hold up but may need to pull the passenger side caliper and inspect if the trend continues. . . .Keep up the good work and the good write ups!
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
Was going to mess some more the calipers today but got tired of looking at a dirty truck. Clean, clay, compound, polish, and wax. Paint is actually holding up except for some rust spots. I'm still not to fond of the colour.




Tomorrow I might try rebuilding my PS pump. I got a seal kit to see if it can make it quieter. I also got two engine mounts in the mail, that should be fun......
 
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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
I'll break this up into different posts so each page doesn't end up with 100 pictures.

Engine mounts and calipers revisit.

Right/passenger mount first. Fairly easy.

Jack engine up via oil pan. My jack has a rubber pad, a junk of wood would work as well. You're not trying to lift the car or engine, just take the load off.


For those who didn't know, your hood does this. Very convenient.


Get some junk out of the way. 10mm bolts hold the fuse panel, AC line, and a grounding cable below. Also move the PS resevoir somewhere else, no need to disconnect it.


Do this bolt first otherwise you won't be able to get it out later. There is the grounding cable, yours will be a different colour.


Undo the rest of the bolts. I hope you have wobble extensions....
 
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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Here are where all the bolts reside.




Old vs New


Don't forget to transfer over your plastic schnibby.


Install is literally reverse.
 
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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
Front mount. This one gave me tons of grief for one reason. You'll need to jack the front of the engine as well. I chose the transmission this time. Again, just trying to take pressure off the mount. YOu may need to jack more than the side mount to get it to lift off the front mount.

Remove the snorkel. For those who didn't know, the PS grey cap makes an excellent cover for your intake while you are servicing things. You're going to have to remove the fan as well. That involves take the rad hose off. Shouldn't spill too much. Don't forget about the sensor at the bottom of the rad, it will probably have to be unplugged.


There it is. Soon those new rad fins will be dented. That O2 sensor bracket and wires will have to be displaced.



Now remove the mount. 2 nuts, four mounting bolts and one through the centre. I think earlier models are slightly different. I didn't have to take off the engine bracket. Nor the EGR pipe. I did manage to wiggle it out. You'll need some wobble extensions for sure. I wouldn't try this without an electric impact.


I then wasted an hour trying to get the new one it. Couldn't get the last bolt to line up. I think the holes were either just slightly off or not big enough. I enlarged the holes with a step drill and then it all went in like butter. Goes with out saying, loosely put in every bolt before tightening anything.
 
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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
These are all the tools I used. Nothing too special. The electric impact wrench is the life saver here. Also present are safety glasses and custom fit ear plugs. I strongly recommend these. They are expensive but last for ever. Hearing damage is a cumulative thing. I wear these all the time; hammering, using power tools, lawn mower, snow blower, on the bikes, on the quad, on the sled...etc. Reduces fatigue as well.

 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
So I redid my dust boots on my brakes with the metal clips.

Put on piston in, with seal, and clamp it down. Then put the dust boot in and push it down all the way.


Put the metal clip on. You'll notice at the top of the picture the seal isn't all the way in. You're going to have to push it in using a very small implement. Careful not to tear anything.


Here it is all done.


Now to get the boot on. That's a bit of trickery. I positioned the piston in front of the boot with a 3/4" piece of wood between the piston and caliper. I then used compressed air to try to blow the boot over the piston. It works but there is a lot of manipulation involved. I could see people getting frustrated with this. By the last piston it I got pretty quick.

Here is a video of it. Can't see much unfortunately. I'm not a youtuber so I don't really have a lot of equipment to get good shots. I should have my blue gloves on but they had just torn and this was my last piston.

Video

Again, if you doing this just to save money you may have a bad time. I did this to save money, get (what I feel) is a better quality rebuild, and hone my skills. Some of my other cars don't have remanufactured calipers available. I enjoy learning new skills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
You people like pictures right? Parts came in and today I wasn't on-call anymore for work so I did some stuff.

First off was my strut assemblies. Surprisingly easy job except for those damn sway bar links. I had to cut them off and then grind whatever was left off until I could punch the remaining stud out. Had I known it was going to be this much of a bitch I would have messed with them when I did the lower control arms as it improves access a bit. In the end, though, I victory was mine. Truck no longer makes a clunking sound.





 
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Discussion Starter · #79 · (Edited)
I then decided my power steering pump was a little loud so I should rebuild it. I didn't want to spend money on a Cardone special. There are a couple youtube videos out there on how to do it (both by someone named Eric, one is successful the other is not) as well as the factory service manual has great instructions and pictures.

Seal kit. It does not have the o-ring for the pressure side hose. Screw you Honda for trying to charge me $10 for an o-ring.


This is the beraring. I'm not sure if rebuilt power steering pumps get a new bearing or just new seals. Assembled in US with Canadian components it looks like. NTN number is 6203LU. You probably could use a 6203LLU. I decided to get it from Honda as it was much quicker, was only a few bucks more than Amazon and I was more likely to a legit NTN bearing vice a counterfeit. Check out this ad. It shows an NTN bearing, it says NTN in the title but when you look at the brand it's N&T. Sketch. And that's a deceitful ad, not a counterfeit.


 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
The process is straight forward. Most difficult part is getting that one thick seal on the inside out. I won't bore you with words when the FSM and youtube does it better. Here are pictures to show you what you are getting into if you decide to try it.






Some people use a hammer or bench vise. I paid for a press so I'm going to use it!
 
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