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Before I bought my AWD Ridgeline, I test drove a FWD version. I hated the FWD version - even on clean, dry roads. It understeered like crazy and even slipped the inside front tire accelerating from a stop into a corner. It just drove like a big, FWD SUV.

The RWD AWD version, on the other hand, handled much more neutrally and confidently. The overdriven rear really makes a difference in everyday driving.
 

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2019 RTL-T Forest Mist Metallic
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Before I bought my AWD Ridgeline, I test drove a FWD version. I hated the FWD version - even on clean, dry roads. It understeered like crazy and even slipped the inside front tire accelerating from a stop into a corner. It just drove like a big, FWD SUV.

The RWD version, on the other hand, handled much more neutrally and confidently. The overdriven rear really makes a difference in everyday driving.
Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but the way understand it, there is no RWD version, and the AWD version should drive the same as a FWD on clean dry roads as the rear differential doesn't kick in until loss of traction is sensed, right?
 

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Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but the way understand it, there is no RWD version, and the AWD version should drive the same as a FWD on clean dry roads as the rear differential doesn't kick in until loss of traction is sensed, right?
It was a typo. Where I typed “RWD” I meant “AWD”. Apologies.

In the all wheel drive version of the truck, it can put 100% of power to the front wheels. But it's under cornering (and a loss of traction) that the power can be directed rearward. (Note that my original post talked about cornering.)

And the rear end is over driven by 2.7%. Which means that the clutch is in the rear differential are always slipping unless that extra speed is needed.

When the truck is making a corner, that “over driven” speed gets moved to the outside rear tire, giving you a torque vectoring yaw-control effect. This helps push the truck around the corner more effectively (less understeer).

Here's some quotes from Honda:

“Honda i-VTM4 progressively distributes optimum torque between the front and rear axles and dynamically distributes engine torque between the left and right rear wheels, with the capacity to overdrive the outside rear wheel by 2.7 percent to create a yaw moment that improves cornering precision.”
Basically that means it maximizes efficiency by putting power to the wheel that can get the most motion out of it. As Honda continues:
“By rotating the outside rear wheel faster than the front wheels while cornering, Ridgeline’s AWD system uses torque vectoring to create a yaw moment to help turn the vehicle through the corner—reducing understeer and improving controllability. With cornering forces more evenly distributed between front and rear tires, overall cornering power is increased in all road conditions.”
 
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