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I am planning to camp myself from north to south in October. Has anyone used the AC outlet in the box to power an induction burner? I will have a tent in the box and this sounds like the safest way to do simple food and coffee water etc, but the 400 watt limit… (tent does not have a flammable floor)
So, how about a burner with a wattage setting??
 

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2017 Honda Ridgeline Black edition
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Assuming you find an induction burning that has adjustable wattage you could probably run it with the AC plug in the bed while the Ridge is running.

However, something to note when it comes to heating the small one-pound propane tanks with a camp stove will offer much better BTUs than an equivalent induction unit for camping plus there is no guarantee that the induction stove will work with the camping cook gear unless you plan on taking your own tried and true pots&pans.

with quick googling and rough maths ( uh oh nerd alert!) 1W is about 3.41 BTUS so @ 400watts that's about 1364 BTUs for one hour whereas a 1 lb propane tank is about 21,000 BTUs.
For perspective, a home range is bout 3000 to 5000 BTUs

Therefore, a 10,000 BTU camping stove tank should last about 2 hours or a smaller 7500 BTU tank should last about 2.8 hours on 1 lb of propane.

For example, for a standard 8oz steak, you want about 80-100 BTU per sq inch to get that deliciousness, and a 6inch pan is about 29 sq inches

400watts x 3.41 BTUs = 1364 BTU; divided by 29 sq inches = 47 BTU per square inch

7500 BTU / 29 sq inch = 258 BTUs

or in simpler terms to boil a kettle of water at home on a standard 5000 BTU ranger it takes about 8-10mins, with the 400watt induction top is might take 3 to 4 times longer

Granted, the AC socket will run much longer assuming you have gas in the tank, but realistically it would take a long time to cook
 

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Assuming you find an induction burning that has adjustable wattage you could probably run it with the AC plug in the bed while the Ridge is running.
I've found that induction "burners", like microwave ovens with inverter technology, typically have a minimum "on" wattage.

For example, "high" might be 1,800 watts continuously, "medium high" might be 1,200 watts continuously, "medium" might be 900 watts continuously, "medium low" might be 500 watts continuously, but "low" might be 500 watts at a 50% duty cycle with a 30 second cycle time so it's drawing 500 watts for 15 seconds then off for 15 seconds which would still exceed the 400 watt limit of the Ridgeline's inverter.
 
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