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I was looking for "cheap" Honda rear brake pads, after seeing that my source in the U.S. couldn't sell to Cdn.'s anymore. On Ebay I ran across a guy that has Honda brake pads for $43.00 CDN.! Shipping in north america included. Man o man what a deal! My local dealer quoted me $90.00! Just to let you know.
 

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Are they actually Honda OEM pads?

You can buy quality brake pads from a lot of online discount stores, including Honda OEM pads. Most run $50-60 USD.

I would pick Honda, Akebono, Centric, ATI, Hawk, etc. over some no-name brand.

You don't want to go too cheap on something as important as brakes!!
 

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I'd agree on staying name brand although I've used Power Stop (Autospecialty) via Rock Auto on the last rear set - including Power Stop rotors - and they seem to be outlasting the OEM aka Akebono with equivalent performance. I really liked the convenience of the pads and rotors set as a kit and very happy with the value. $85 + approx $23 freight for the rear > A set of Power Stop Z16 Ceramic Pads, 2 ea Power Stop rotors & all the hardware. Hard to beat...

Power Stop Pad Set Rear alone is only $21-23/set + freight but seem well made...I've also have had excellent luck with Centric Posi-Quiet Ceramics on other vehicles at about $25/set + freight.
 

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I would consider Power Stop a name brand. They are sold by quite a few reputable dealers. I may try them next time. Those are great prices!

I've usually shopped TireRack for similar products, usually Akebono for pads.
More money though, but not unreasonable.

More importantly,Ebay is not the first place I would go for brake parts unless I knew it was a recognizable brand.
 

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+1 for Akebono OEM types. It seems like I remember getting them via Amazon?
First time I ordered them it was from TireRack because my local mech who did the work at that time is one of their top reviewed installers.
 

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Wagner Thermo Quiet on everything. Quiet and at least 100k every time. $30~ on Amazon.
 

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Wagner, another great name in brake parts. Used to be Wagner-Lockheed in the ol' days.
They still use the same brand name for some classic car brake parts.

Raybestos is another.
 

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........ and the Raybestos "reds" used to come with a life-time (as long as you own the car) warranty, iirc.
 

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I never change just the pads.If you don't turn the rotors your braking performance will suffer as well as the new pads won't last.So you should just change the rotors while you're there.
If you do the work yourself it will cut down on the cost.
If you need the factory service manual (free) PM me.

I put this on my front it was a huge upgrade from stock.But they are way more nosier then stock as well.But it stops quicker with less pedal travel.Ill be putting them on my back this year sometime as well.Cheap and free shipping.

Performance Drilled and Slotted Brake Rotor (Price each: $64.61)
Performance Ceramic Brake Pad (Price:$52.00)

http://www.primechoiceautoparts.ca/e-mmyproducts.aspx
 

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Sorry Breye,
But my experience says that's just nonsense; at least broadly applied.
There may be some particular vehicles that have that deficiency, but the Ridgeline (& all other vehicles I have owned) is not one of them.
If your rotors are bad, then they are bad & need to be replaced (or machined).... and this is not uncommon. But if they are NOT bad, then they are not bad, period.

Rotors can go bad for a number of reasons, not the least of which is heavy over-use. I'd suggest that if you've always had this problem with rotors, it has a lot more to do with your driving (braking) habits, than it does with any "typical" rotor replacement requirements. Overheating from a lot of heavy trailering (especially w/o good trailer brake assist) can also take a toll on otherwise good rotors. Chattering due to poor caliper lubrication can take a toll. Faulty (usually cheap) pads can cause rotor problems. A poorly designed rotor could of course also cause shorter rotor life under otherwise equivalent conditions. "Incompatible" pad materials have been reported to decrease rotor life; I have only read this... and have no personal experience, but apparently changing back & forth from semi-metalic to ceramic, to ??? is not good for rotors? But having said all of these things, a good rotor that is not subjected to heavier than normal use, and has been part of a properly serviced vehicle should last as long as you own the vehicle, in most cases.

Personally, I have replaced rotors only maybe 3 or 4 times in 40+ years of driving. Once was on a new-ish vehicle, and they were just "bad" rotors from the factory (Plymouth Voyager). Another time due to chatter, and a couple of times in my younger/dumber years when I just let pads go too long & they grooved the rotors. I probably only turned the rotors in 1 or 2 of those cases back in the old days when that kind of service had cost advantages.

Caveat to these comments..... what I'm saying is as it applies to normal daily personal use driving; NOT racing or other high-demand environments.

Long story short.... it is my firm opinion that "just changing" the rotors because you are changing the pads is an absolute waste of money. You might as well just toss something else out while you're down there that doesn't need replacing. I'm just sayin........:act039:
 

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I never change just the pads.If you don't turn the rotors your braking performance will suffer as well as the new pads won't last.So you should just change the rotors while you're there.
If you do the work yourself it will cut down on the cost.
If you need the factory service manual (free) PM me.

I put this on my front it was a huge upgrade from stock.But they are way more nosier then stock as well.But it stops quicker with less pedal travel.Ill be putting them on my back this year sometime as well.Cheap and free shipping.

Performance Drilled and Slotted Brake Rotor (Price each: $64.61)
Performance Ceramic Brake Pad (Price:$52.00)

http://www.primechoiceautoparts.ca/e-mmyproducts.aspx
What do you consider a 'huge' upgrade? I never thought there was an issue with the stock brakes. Any noticeable improvement would be the result of replacing badly worn brake parts or you just spent a fortune on 6 piston calipers and oversized rotors but not at those prices! Plus, the parts do not seem to have a recognizable brand name.

When my local mechanic has done my brakes he typically dressed the rotors on the axle, even if they are in spec. It is a very light finish which he claims improves the bedding of the pads.

I could give long list of his achievements but let's just say he knows what he is doing even if he seems to get OC about it at times. Plus, his charges are reasonable and I can watch & learn.

Still on the originals on my RL.
 

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Personally I wouldn't go with cheapest, but find a medium and lean towards the best if the cost isn't that much more.
 

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I just don't like the feel of the RL brakes. So when I replaced mine I went with the one I posted.I have never tried anything like thees before but the price was cheap enough so I thought what the hell.

Not just me but even the wife notice the difference admittedly.But like I said they're noisy.
 

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Sorry Breye,
But my experience says that's just nonsense; at least broadly applied.
There may be some particular vehicles that have that deficiency, but the Ridgeline (& all other vehicles I have owned) is not one of them.
If your rotors are bad, then they are bad & need to be replaced (or machined).... and this is not uncommon. But if they are NOT bad, then they are not bad, period.

Rotors can go bad for a number of reasons, not the least of which is heavy over-use. I'd suggest that if you've always had this problem with rotors, it has a lot more to do with your driving (braking) habits, than it does with any "typical" rotor replacement requirements. Overheating from a lot of heavy trailering (especially w/o good trailer brake assist) can also take a toll on otherwise good rotors. Chattering due to poor caliper lubrication can take a toll. Faulty (usually cheap) pads can cause rotor problems. A poorly designed rotor could of course also cause shorter rotor life under otherwise equivalent conditions. "Incompatible" pad materials have been reported to decrease rotor life; I have only read this... and have no personal experience, but apparently changing back & forth from semi-metalic to ceramic, to ??? is not good for rotors? But having said all of these things, a good rotor that is not subjected to heavier than normal use, and has been part of a properly serviced vehicle should last as long as you own the vehicle, in most cases.

Personally, I have replaced rotors only maybe 3 or 4 times in 40+ years of driving. Once was on a new-ish vehicle, and they were just "bad" rotors from the factory (Plymouth Voyager). Another time due to chatter, and a couple of times in my younger/dumber years when I just let pads go too long & they grooved the rotors. I probably only turned the rotors in 1 or 2 of those cases back in the old days when that kind of service had cost advantages.

Caveat to these comments..... what I'm saying is as it applies to normal daily personal use driving; NOT racing or other high-demand environments.

Long story short.... it is my firm opinion that "just changing" the rotors because you are changing the pads is an absolute waste of money. You might as well just toss something else out while you're down there that doesn't need replacing. I'm just sayin........:act039:
If you lived in Canada with the winters we have, you would probably replace your rotors too. Just sayin...
 
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