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Discussion Starter #1
I keep reading about the G1 vs G2, and having owned both (but only towed with the G1) I'm wondering is the new truck less capable than the first? I posted earlier carrying 1400 pounds of rock in the bed with my G2 without issue, but am I exceeding my payload capacity? Not according to the vehicle posted truck limitations that you can find on the inside of the drivers door. According to the manual yes, but I took it a step further and dry weighed my tuck.

Payload = GVWR - truck weight, passengers, and any cargo. If this is true, and by accounts it is based on every website I've ever visited, my RL has a true payload of 1609 pounds. The door sticker, as the manual shows a different figure, but IT'S THE SAME for any RL2 you'll ever see on a lot. This is on Honda, and it's a point that the fast lane truck has brought up as well. Am I nitpicking, maybe so, but if I'm in an accident I'd like to know what the true capacities of the truck are. Is the frame in the G2 weaker? I see nothing about the 7 cross member design of the G1, only some bull **** about ACE engineering.

Bottom line, the G2 hauls well, but why advertise 1584lbs in payload if EVERY SINGLE TRUCK shows 1323. I wish someone could give me an answer, cause Honda ain't responding.
 

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I keep reading about the G1 vs G2, and having owned both (but only towed with the G1) I'm wondering is the new truck less capable than the first? I posted earlier carrying 1400 pounds of rock in the bed with my G2 without issue, but am I exceeding my payload capacity? Not according to the vehicle posted truck limitations that you can find on the inside of the drivers door. According to the manual yes, but I took it a step further and dry weighed my tuck.

Payload = GVWR - truck weight, passengers, and any cargo. If this is true, and by accounts it is based on every website I've ever visited, my RL has a true payload of 1609 pounds. The door sticker, as the manual shows a different figure, but IT'S THE SAME for any RL2 you'll ever see on a lot. This is on Honda, and it's a point that the fast lane truck has brought up as well. Am I nitpicking, maybe so, but if I'm in an accident I'd like to know what the true capacities of the truck are. Is the frame in the G2 weaker? I see nothing about the 7 cross member design of the G1, only some bull **** about ACE engineering.

Bottom line, the G2 hauls well, but why advertise 1584lbs in payload if EVERY SINGLE TRUCK shows 1323. I wish someone could give me an answer, cause Honda ain't responding.


It seems you are referring to payload as the bed payload in your calculation. Subtracting passenger weight and cargo weight is just reducing the payload of the overall vehicle to get the bed payload. I'm not sure where the 1323 number comes from and I'm out of town so I can't see what it says on my truck. Honda does advertise the largest payload number of 1584, but they do show payload varying by model on the website as the weight of the truck varies with features.



I am curious how you got a dry weight on your truck? You drained every fluid out of it including oil, transmission, differential, brake, etc.?
 

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I'm not an engineer, but i did drop out of engineering school.

I do recall reading somewhere that the rigidity (I believe) of the frame/unibody is improved in the g2. Not sure if that helps with hauling or not.

My uneducated guess is that the g2 is just as capable as the g1, and my impression is that in many ways the g2 is maybe slightly more capable. To me, a lot of those max rating numbers are come up with by lawyers, and are probably good guidelines, but can probably be safely exceeded by not too big of a margin on rare occasions.

Hopefully, these limits are only needed to be pushed on very rare occasions, and for relatively short distances. Otherwise, maybe a fullsize truck would be a better option for someone who frequently hauls large loads over long distances.

I think the most important thing is to drive extremely cautiously when hauling a large load. Really reduce speed, increase following distances, etc. Those things should also cause less stress on the vehicle as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Good question. I didn't drain any of the fluids so the term dry weight is inaccurate. The truck weighed 4635 with me in it and I'm pushing 225lbs. So with fluids, half a tank of gas etc, the truck weighs 4410. GVWR is 6019. 1609 left over for passengers and cargo.


It seems you are referring to payload as the bed payload in your calculation. Subtracting passenger weight and cargo weight is just reducing the payload of the overall vehicle to get the bed payload. I'm not sure where the 1323 number comes from and I'm out of town so I can't see what it says on my truck. Honda does advertise the largest payload number of 1584, but they do show payload varying by model on the website as the weight of the truck varies with features.



I am curious how you got a dry weight on your truck? You drained every fluid out of it including oil, transmission, differential, brake, etc.?
 

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I think I see what bxhowell2 is saying.

My RTS AWD has a GVWR of 6019 and has a curb weight of 4433. So I would think that 6019-4433=1586lbs or total cargo/payload (note that the specs from Honda say it should be 1580?)

Yet there is a note on the tire sticker that says "The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed 600kg or 1323 lbs."

So I agree, which is it 1323, 1580, or 1586lbs for total payload?
 

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It seems you are referring to payload as the bed payload in your calculation. Subtracting passenger weight and cargo weight is just reducing the payload of the overall vehicle to get the bed payload. I'm not sure where the 1323 number comes from and I'm out of town so I can't see what it says on my truck. Honda does advertise the largest payload number of 1584, but they do show payload varying by model on the website as the weight of the truck varies with features.



I am curious how you got a dry weight on your truck? You drained every fluid out of it including oil, transmission, differential, brake, etc.?
This is an interesting question which branches off from the G2 specs thread.

FWIW, Honda's empty weight includes full fuel as well as all fluids.

But the 1323 lbs sticker number vs specified max weight less empty weight as measured is an excellent question.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for noticing this. I thought I was the only one. It's not that we will be loading our trucks with 1500lbs every day, but the question is, is it safe. I don't see anything about max weight in the bed.

I think I see what bxhowell2 is saying.

My RTS AWD has a GVWR of 6019 and has a curb weight of 4433. So I would think that 6019-4433=1586lbs or total cargo/payload (note that the specs from Honda say it should be 1580?)

Yet there is a note on the tire sticker that says "The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed 600kg or 1323 lbs."

So I agree, which is it 1323, 1580, or 1586lbs for total payload?
 

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I think I see what bxhowell2 is saying.

My RTS AWD has a GVWR of 6019 and has a curb weight of 4433. So I would think that 6019-4433=1586lbs or total cargo/payload (note that the specs from Honda say it should be 1580?)

Yet there is a note on the tire sticker that says "The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed 600kg or 1323 lbs."

So I agree, which is it 1323, 1580, or 1586lbs for total payload?
The 1323 refers to the capacity inside the cab.

Each person would have to weigh 265 lbs to exceed that rating.

However if you count my wife's purse then it's a lot less per person.

In reality if you load up with a family of four (500lbs), full tank (120 lbs) and maybe (100 lbs) under the seats then there is only about 780 lbs left for camping gear in the bed.

Do the same math for a Tacoma 4x4 and you get only 1175-500-120-100 = 455 lbs

So one dirt bike instead of two .... Can't have that in a Honda family can you.


PS: with a typical family on board and the toys in the back the weight distribution should be better from a leveling stand point. The sag issue in the test is with all the payload over the rear wheels.
 

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I realize this is an old thread, but I'm kinda hung up on it. As someone who definitely plans to use the "truck features" of my RL, I do want to know what the load ratings are. Here is the contradictory information at hand. It is available from multiple sources, but the sticker inside the driver's side door and Page 403 of the post recent manual pretty well line it out. By the way, some of this is repeat from other posts in here, but putting it all in one place.

Just the facts:
  • The sticker inside the door indicates "The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed 1323 lbs." This is probably the most restrictive and most concerning. One poster said "this is just what is in the cab", but that makes no sense, and is further rebuked by page 401 of the manual saying "This figure includes the total weight of all occupants, cargo, and accessories, and the tongue load if you are towing a trailer".
  • On page 401 it states that the maximum load limit is 1,477 lbs (with AWD & Sunroof). OK, this is in-line with the marketing material, but still about 150 lbs contradictory with the door sticker.
  • The curb weight is supposedly 4,515 (RTL-E) and the GVWR is 6,019 from the Honda Website. Well subtraction gives you 1504 max cargo/people/etc. weight, which is still 27 lbs greater than the 1,477 listed above.
  • Page 406 states that the max bed weight is 1,100lbs with a max trunk weight of 300lbs. Together this is 1,400... which doesn't seem too surprising. But how many RL owners who never read the manual probably think they can put 1,477 lbs in the bed from the marketing literature, and would never know that they're supposed to limit that to 1,100 lbs. Furthermore, where is that limit really coming from. If the tires, bearings, transmission, etc. etc. etc. can all support a GVWR of 6,019, what about the construction of the bed limits us to 1,100? The trunk weight isn't all that surprising, except that they show using it as a cooler. Water weighs ~ 62lbs per cu. ft. and the trunk is 7.3 cu ft. Just make sure you don't fill it past 66% full of ice and your favorite beverage. Which actually is probably a reasonable number since only the lower part makes sense to be a cooler and ice likely has some air in it or in between it...
  • I will also mention, for completeness sake, the tailgate max weight is 300 lbs. That isn't really part of this, but is interesting, considering me and two friends are easily 600 lbs, over twice the weight. Now that 300 is a driving weight, which would have bumps in the road etc, but still, double the weight rating with just three people sitting on the tailgate?
  • Last thing, the tongue weight max is 600 lbs - again just being complete here. The only reason this is a little odd, is that lowers for 495 with five occupants, assumed to weigh 150lbs each with 15lbs of cargo each. Sum all that up and you only get 1,095lbs... which is well below every other limitation above, dispite the load being pretty well distributed due to passengers in the front and tongue weight in the very back. So it seems like you should still be able to have 600lbs of tongue weight, which would put you at 1,425... well under the GVWR and advertised max load. But over the door sticker 1,323.
My concern is, as an engineer, I would always tend to use the most restrictive number, which generally seems to be the 1,323 (which seems to come out of thin air) or, possibly the 495 of tongue weight in some circumstances... but I'm not very happy with that number as it just doesn't make any sense against the other numbers. Could it be that the 1,323 is the max the tires can support at 35psi? I only throw that out there, since it is on the same sticker that recommends inflating the tires to 35 psi. So, interestingly, 1,323 plus (19.5gals of gas times 6.3lbs per gal) is 1,445... which could resolve most of the variation between the marketed max load and the sticker max load. One considers gasoline (the safety sticker) and one doesn't (the marketing information). It wouldn't be the first time unrealistic situations (i.e. no fuel) were used to bolster marketing specs.

Oh, interestingly, the manual also says to not exceed 62mph when towing a utility trailer or boat and 55mph when towing a fixed-sided trailer. How many people ever see that in the manual...

2017SilverRTL-E
 

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I believe that it was established in another thread that the 1323 payload sticker was an error on Honda's part (and there may be a TSB on it). The payload should be GVWR - vehicle curb weight.

The payload ratings are intertwined with the tow ratings, which are J2807-certified. People often knock the 5k tow rating on the Ridgeline, but other trucks aren't much better. Sure, they have higher ratings, IF you get the correct version, correct powertrain, correct gearing, get the max tow package, use a weight distribution hitch and don't exceed payload ratings (which include tongue weight). Honda makes it easy by eliminating all if those pitfalls. There are likely many F150 owners who think they can tow 12k, when in reality they may only legally tow around 8 or 9k, or less, depending on options.

As for the ratings in general, there is generally quite a bit of cushion built in, to account for a wide variety of conditions, such as people improperly loading a vehicle, and not being a hazard/nuisance in traffic because you can't accelerate into the freeway with your heavy load.

Look at boats, for example. If you calculate how much weight it takes to sink a boat, it is roughly 3x the rating on the capacity plate. Mfrs rate conservatively, because you may have an inexperienced operator that loads the boat so that the weight is not properly distributed, can not handle properly, and could easily take a wave over the bow in inclement conditions.

Ropes are another example. Reputable mfrs rate their ropes' breaking strength at about one-third of its true breaking strength, and much moreso if the rope is certified to bear a person's weight, such as in mountain climbing.
 

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I bet it was lawyer "error." They want something they can point to when death and mayhem ensue related to cargo/towing. I think the relationship to tires is because of the rash of lawsuits about under-inflated tires before TPMS became common. As I recall, Ford was on the hotseat. Then there was that gigantic fine GM had to pay over the ignition key-switch fiasco. Toyota's problems. Car manufacturers are probably feeling pretty jumpy. And their lawyers are probably in a constant state of apoplexy. What is the load rating of the Firestones anyway. Anyone know?
 

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The 1323 rating is probably for the tires. The 1584 rating is probably for the truck assuming all the other hardware can handle it.
 

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1323 was apparently a sticker on the G2 Pilot. Some of those stickers may have erroneously found their way into the G2 Ridgeline.
 

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My sticker says not to exceed 1477 lbs.
 

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My sticker says not to exceed 1477 lbs.
Maybe they fixed it. Jimsc, did you buy your truck more recently? And what trim line did you get? Oh, RTL-E.
 
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