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Winter and dryer air just hit North Florida- as soon as that happened I started getting a static schock every time I get out of the truck.

Anyone else experiencing this?
Any fixes?
 

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Yeah over the last few days it has gotten worse.

I try not to slide out of my seat. It seems to help a bit.
 

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Ever try spraying your clothes (or your seats if they are material) with this?



Just an idea.

RidgeInTheVille
 

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Anybody want to speculate why it's been worse the last few days? It's obviously not a regional thing which rules out my idea that it's a weather system.
 

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Well maybe what I posted isn't the best thing out there. :eek:
 

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It is a seasonal thing.

"We usually only notice static electricity in the winter when the air is very dry. During the summer, the air is more humid. The water in the air helps electrons move off you more quickly, so you can not build up as big a charge."

RidgeInTheVille
 

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Truckin' said:
Anybody want to speculate why it's been worse the last few days? It's obviously not a regional thing which rules out my idea that it's a weather system.
I reckon it's a combination of drier air and winter clothing (more synthetics in many jackets, sweaters, socks). I haven't noticed it much in my Ridge (haven't changed off-duty dress habits much, yet) but I have noticed it at work in our police cars (winter clothing in use due to extended periods outside). If I'm not mistaken, the times that I've been shocked in the Ridge were on the way to and from work.
 

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It's the drier air. It's also a dangerous time of year to fill auxiliary gas containers at the pump. Make sure you're grounded to something and that the container is far away from other vehicles.
 

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Kellcut said:
No shocks here. Is it worse with the cloth seats maybe?
yep, don't think it happens with leather seats. The air gets a bit drier and it gets bad. I've just taken one of those sheets you throw in with clothes in the drier (unscented preferably) and wiped the seats down with it in the past. Generally stops the shocks for awhile.

-Trevor
 

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H&A said:
yep, don't think it happens with leather seats. The air gets a bit drier and it gets bad. I've just taken one of those sheets you throw in with clothes in the drier (unscented preferably) and wiped the seats down with it in the past. Generally stops the shocks for awhile.
-Trevor
\


No shocks here either! Then again I'm Italian, nothing shocks me!
 

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When you spin in the seat to get out is where most of the charge comes from as well as you feet accross the carpet. If you are grounded during this process you will discharge as it is made and should feel nothing, it's when you are not grounded and build a charge and then ground yourself you get the sparks.... I hate it myself, about the third or forth time I remember to ground myself as I get out. I open the door, place my left hand on the door jam, spin around then grab the top of the door with my right hand and get out, when I do this I don't get any sparks.... Caution, don't put your left hand in the open space when a back seat passenger is getting out, as they tend to shut the door on your hand, that hurts more than the shock,,, ha ha plus becareful the wind doesn't blow the door closed either. A friend said he leaves the key in the ing, and hold on to it while spinning out, putting his index finger on the metal part (he pulls the key out just enough to touch metal) once facing outward he removes the key and steps out no shock....
Works for me. Here in FL. You guys where it freezes might look into a grounding strap, that would keep you from sticking to the outside of the RL.
If you remembered to take off the gloves......
 

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It's an unfortunate experience of owning a car. ALL vehicles do this, and it's because static builds up over time, but because the tires insulate the vehicle, the static electricity can only escape when you get out of the vehicle. There are "chains" available that constantly connect the vehicle to the ground, but my understanding is that the can be annoying, and can cause sparks under the vehicle. In other works, just get used to it. Sorry I couldn't have a realistically positive experience.
 

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I don't notice any problems with static so far, probably due to the leather seats. I did learn some things about living with static electricity problems when I had my first cave, no that would be my first apartment, a few years :rolleyes: ago. It had electric forced air heat so it was so dry that the humidistat rarely read above zero. The apartment had that groovy nylon shag carpet, earth-tone colors of course. (I can still hear In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida palying...) If you walk across the floor with leather shoes you would draw a heavy blue spark about 1 1/2 inches long to anything that was grounded with a loud crack! It was entertaining when visitors came over but was a real pain to live with. It didn't take long to teach yourself to remember to make sure that you were discharged before using the bathroom :eek: .
A few things to make living with static electricity easier are:
Increase the humidity - decrease or eliminate the static. Adding humidity also makes it possible to feel warm. It also will allow you to lower your thermostat by 10 degrees or more and not constantly be chilled to the bone. Buying a humidifier was the best investment that I ever made. Unfortunately, adding humidity in a vehicle is not practical.
Use seat and carpet treatments as suggested on earlier posts.
If you have to discharge the static, hold a metal object like your house key, a coin or even your ring very tightly and touch a grounded object with it instead of your finger. It takes the sting out of the zap.
Hold onto or remain in contact with grounded objects as you move around to continually discharge the static. You may look like you have an obsessive compulsive issue, but at least you wont have fire jumping from your finger tips.
At home or office you have to keep that pocket lightning that you are carrying around away from electronic devices, especially computers and telephones. Discharge the zap to something else before touching the keyboard, mouse or the telephone. Light switches, door frames and the body of appliances are safe for discharging your zap to. If you can't add enough humidity to prevent the problem, get a grounded chair mat and desktop mat.
In the truck, just hold onto the door frame as you are exiting.
I don't know about adding a ground strap. I am not sure that it might not make the problem worse if the source of the static is your shoes or clothing sliding across the seats or the floor.
Then again, you could drag a chain along with you, or just drive naked and wet.
 

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I knew we should have got the leather seats!!! Oh well, maybe next time.:p
 
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