Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Okay, so we went to my local Honda Dealership and right on the driveway was a blue RL with moonroof Ridgeline just sitting there. I was in "euphoria" because I WANT this truck pretty bad. It's funny, I knew everything the salesman said about the truck since I researched and read the reviews on it for almost 2 weeks.

BUT... Since my family's in a pickle, (divorce) my mom is forced to buy a cheaper SUV since the Ridgeline might be too expensive (insurance). And since there aren't any cheaper SUV's, I have to go with a used one. We saw a few Expeditions and Tahoes with at least 100,000 miles on them and their like, $7,500-$12,000 which helps make her decision. If anyone can find me a good deal for a ridgeline, please post.

Note: We're shopping for my FIRST car, her plan is to get me a used car and get used to driving then get a Ridgeline next year (hopefully the 2007 model) and take care of that baby. Does anyone think I should just wait for the Ridgeline next year and get the used car now?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
IMHO thinkinblue, the short answer to your question is yes, at this time you should wait, but. The but is that since this is to be your first car you are likely to be a new driver and, as such, you need to realize that you are at a much higher risk of having an accident within the next 2 years than you will be as time and experience increase. As much as I love the Ridgeline and consider it to be one of the safest vehicles on the road, as long as your first new-to-you vehicle has a high safety rating and has front and side air bags, ABS, and is not one that is prone to rollover, you will likely be better off with it as opposed to an expensive new vehicle. You will be learning a lot as the owner of your first vehicle. Not everything will be about the vehicle itself. Keep in mind that we all learn from our mistakes.
I will try to resist the temptation to get on my soap box or preach about safe driving. Ok, I can't help myself. You really need to take to heart that you have an enormous responsibility to yourself, your family (present and future), your passengers, pedestrians, and the real live people in every other vehicle on the road. Any irresponsible idiot can try to act out special effect movie scenes from "The Fast and The Furious" on public roads. If you have the vision and the maturity to rise above all that and take pride in driving safely and correctly, you will stand head and shoulders above far too many people, young and old, these days.
Phew! Here endeth today’s sermon.
One more word of advice and a little perspective. You are not required to have a car payment for the rest of your life. There is a way around it. It takes some strength and some discipline, especially right now at this time while you are young. The 'trick' is to own one vehicle outright without any loan payments for a few years so that you can save enough to have a substantial amount of equity when you purchase your next vehicle. That may require that you start with a less expensive vehicle initially, hopefully with lower operating costs, and resist the temptation to spend a lot of money on expensive tires, wheels, and other accessories that will never add value to the vehicle at trade in time. If you have the discipline to take that approach early on, you will be able to trade up each time that you need a new vehicle. When you do trade, if you keep the amount financed to an absolute minimum, not the maximum that the bank will give you, it won't be long before you will be able to purchase almost any vehicle that you want for cash. The payments and the interest on large loans will keep most people from ever reaching that point. If you have what it takes now to take a disciplined stepped approach to owning vehicles with the goal in mind of reaching the point of not having any car payments, before long you will be able to have any vehicle that you want and not be perpetually in debt. Being able to spend your hard earned money on your vehicle, not interest, will have life long benefits.

Well, if that was the short answer to your question… Yikes!
Sorry for the rant.
The readers digest version is, yes, buy a less expensive but safe, new-to-you vehicle now. Own it outright for a few years while saving for the next one. How many steps and how long it will take you to be able to buy your dream vehicle depends on a lot of personal factors and events in your life. Keep in mind that you priorities are likely to change with time and they may not involve a vehicle at all later on. If or when that does happen, you will be way ahead if you can have that car payment thing behind you.
Would you like to buy a Ridgeline for cash? Now you’re thinking!
I wish you the best!
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Ultra-HOG said:
IMHO thinkinblue, the short answer to your question is yes, at this time you should wait, but. The but is that since this is to be your first car you are likely to be a new driver and, as such, you need to realize that you are at a much higher risk of having an accident within the next 2 years than you will be as time and experience increase. As much as I love the Ridgeline and consider it to be one of the safest vehicles on the road, as long as your first new-to-you vehicle has a high safety rating and has front and side air bags, ABS, and is not one that is prone to rollover, you will likely be better off with it as opposed to an expensive new vehicle. You will be learning a lot as the owner of your first vehicle. Not everything will be about the vehicle itself. Keep in mind that we all learn from our mistakes.
I will try to resist the temptation to get on my soap box or preach about safe driving. Ok, I can't help myself. You really need to take to heart that you have an enormous responsibility to yourself, your family (present and future), your passengers, pedestrians, and the real live people in every other vehicle on the road. Any irresponsible idiot can try to act out special effect movie scenes from "The Fast and The Furious" on public roads. If you have the vision and the maturity to rise above all that and take pride in driving safely and correctly, you will stand head and shoulders above far too many people, young and old, these days.
Phew! Here endeth today’s sermon.
One more word of advice and a little perspective. You are not required to have a car payment for the rest of your life. There is a way around it. It takes some strength and some discipline, especially right now at this time while you are young. The 'trick' is to own one vehicle outright without any loan payments for a few years so that you can save enough to have a substantial amount of equity when you purchase your next vehicle. That may require that you start with a less expensive vehicle initially, hopefully with lower operating costs, and resist the temptation to spend a lot of money on expensive tires, wheels, and other accessories that will never add value to the vehicle at trade in time. If you have the discipline to take that approach early on, you will be able to trade up each time that you need a new vehicle. When you do trade, if you keep the amount financed to an absolute minimum, not the maximum that the bank will give you, it won't be long before you will be able to purchase almost any vehicle that you want for cash. The payments and the interest on large loans will keep most people from ever reaching that point. If you have what it takes now to take a disciplined stepped approach to owning vehicles with the goal in mind of reaching the point of not having any car payments, before long you will be able to have any vehicle that you want and not be perpetually in debt. Being able to spend your hard earned money on your vehicle, not interest, will have life long benefits.

Well, if that was the short answer to your question… Yikes!
Sorry for the rant.
The readers digest version is, yes, buy a less expensive but safe, new-to-you vehicle now. Own it outright for a few years while saving for the next one. How many steps and how long it will take you to be able to buy your dream vehicle depends on a lot of personal factors and events in your life. Keep in mind that you priorities are likely to change with time and they may not involve a vehicle at all later on. If or when that does happen, you will be way ahead if you can have that car payment thing behind you.
Would you like to buy a Ridgeline for cash? Now you’re thinking!
I wish you the best!
The King of ROC has spoken. Can't add anything here. Great advice thinkinblue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
964 Posts
Ultra-HOG said:
IMHO thinkinblue, the short answer to your question is yes, at this time you should wait, but. The but is that since this is to be your first car you are likely to be a new driver and, as such, you need to realize that you are at a much higher risk of having an accident within the next 2 years than you will be as time and experience increase. As much as I love the Ridgeline and consider it to be one of the safest vehicles on the road, as long as your first new-to-you vehicle has a high safety rating and has front and side air bags, ABS, and is not one that is prone to rollover, you will likely be better off with it as opposed to an expensive new vehicle. You will be learning a lot as the owner of your first vehicle. Not everything will be about the vehicle itself. Keep in mind that we all learn from our mistakes.
I will try to resist the temptation to get on my soap box or preach about safe driving. Ok, I can't help myself. You really need to take to heart that you have an enormous responsibility to yourself, your family (present and future), your passengers, pedestrians, and the real live people in every other vehicle on the road. Any irresponsible idiot can try to act out special effect movie scenes from "The Fast and The Furious" on public roads. If you have the vision and the maturity to rise above all that and take pride in driving safely and correctly, you will stand head and shoulders above far too many people, young and old, these days.
Phew! Here endeth today’s sermon.
One more word of advice and a little perspective. You are not required to have a car payment for the rest of your life. There is a way around it. It takes some strength and some discipline, especially right now at this time while you are young. The 'trick' is to own one vehicle outright without any loan payments for a few years so that you can save enough to have a substantial amount of equity when you purchase your next vehicle. That may require that you start with a less expensive vehicle initially, hopefully with lower operating costs, and resist the temptation to spend a lot of money on expensive tires, wheels, and other accessories that will never add value to the vehicle at trade in time. If you have the discipline to take that approach early on, you will be able to trade up each time that you need a new vehicle. When you do trade, if you keep the amount financed to an absolute minimum, not the maximum that the bank will give you, it won't be long before you will be able to purchase almost any vehicle that you want for cash. The payments and the interest on large loans will keep most people from ever reaching that point. If you have what it takes now to take a disciplined stepped approach to owning vehicles with the goal in mind of reaching the point of not having any car payments, before long you will be able to have any vehicle that you want and not be perpetually in debt. Being able to spend your hard earned money on your vehicle, not interest, will have life long benefits.

Well, if that was the short answer to your question… Yikes!
Sorry for the rant.
The readers digest version is, yes, buy a less expensive but safe, new-to-you vehicle now. Own it outright for a few years while saving for the next one. How many steps and how long it will take you to be able to buy your dream vehicle depends on a lot of personal factors and events in your life. Keep in mind that you priorities are likely to change with time and they may not involve a vehicle at all later on. If or when that does happen, you will be way ahead if you can have that car payment thing behind you.
Would you like to buy a Ridgeline for cash? Now you’re thinking!
I wish you the best!
I agree 100% with this.

I will add. SUV's are not the best First vehicle to own/drive. They are much more prone to rollovers, even the safest ones, than cars. There are many statistics out there to show that young drivers and SUV's are a bad combination. Even if you are a GREAt driver, you still don't have the experience. Get a safe car with a good safety rating (an Accord/Civic) or an AWD car (Subaru). Your friends might not think it is the coolest, but you will be much safer.

::Stepping off MY soapbox::
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
Great advice Ultra-Hog!!

I had an Expedition (just sold it to Carmax and got my wife a Pilot) and loved it but be ready for getting an MPG of 12 - 13. I would recommend a smaller SUV especially if you (the new driver) is going to drive it. It and the Tahoe are really BIG!!! I would look for a used Civic, Accord, or even a used Volvo. Volvo's are very safe vehicles but I've never owned one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,043 Posts
There's some great advice here.

My suggestion is to have Mom get you the best POS she can get for under $1,000. Something big, American, four doors or more. No need for airbags if you have a V8 in front of you. A Buick LeSabre, Chevy Impala, Ford Crown Vic. An ex-police car will add panache. Cheap to own, cheap and plentiful parts, cheap insurance, a gas hog but then that will help you moderate your cruising.

Then save your money for what you really want.
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
shovelhd said:
There's some great advice here.

My suggestion is to have Mom get you the best POS she can get for under $1,000. Something big, American, four doors or more. No need for airbags if you have a V8 in front of you. A Buick LeSabre, Chevy Impala, Ford Crown Vic. An ex-police car will add panache. Cheap to own, cheap and plentiful parts, cheap insurance, a gas hog but then that will help you moderate your cruising.

Then save your money for what you really want.
HONK HONK HONK!! <----Attention getter!!
NOTHING WITH MORE THAN 2 DOORS AND 2 SEATS IF YOU CAN MAKE THAT HAPPEN.
Too tempting to drive all the friends around. I have scraped too many kids off the street in my years on the Fire Department.
Just some friendly Mom advice!! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,170 Posts
While I agree with Ultra-Hog in general, I disagree with the overall statement. You should finance your first several vehicle right after you get started, even if you have the money to pay for them outright. Finance a small amount of them but definitely finance them over the 4 years or so that you can. This is because financing a car shows a good credit history if you make your payment religiously. This payment history improves your credit rating. You need some long term credit to really get a high rating. If you pay cash for everything you will never get a credit history and thus your rating will always be poor. Houses are one of the best ways to improve your credit, but that isn't something most people buy for the first couple years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
Financing is included in the plan, at least for the first several steps. Keeping the amount financed low as a percentage of the purchase price will keep the payments low and affordable for a relatively short period of time, perhaps 2 years. That will help build a good credit rating for someone starting out since they will be demonstrating that they can establish a debt and make payments consistently and on time. If the amount financed is well below the maximum percentage of the vehicle value they will also be more likely to get the loan(s) in the first place. Additionally, they will be able to prevent their debt to income ratio from getting maxed out and choking them off from the opportunity to establish additional lines of credit elsewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,576 Posts
Some added finance advice from someone in the field and someone who went many years not having enough money to buy a nice car. Pay cash for your first car and buy it from a family member or closely known party that took good care of the vehicle and wants to help you out by giving you a good price for a good vehicle. Establish your long term credit by buying something that would be deemed "easy to walk away from" like furniture. Credit companies place a premium on seeing someone continue to make payments on something as non-essential as furniture when compared to a home or a car.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,881 Posts
Great advise from both Mom & Dad of the ROC.!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
Well, if the truth has to come out, 25 years ago, I heard some of my employees as they were making plans to go out to the bars after work. Of course, in a lighthearted way, I had to remind them that they had to be at work on time and in good shape in the morning, that they needed to be careful, etc, etc, etc.... I am sure that you have heard the speech yourself. It was all in fun, sort of, but you get the idea. Keep in mind that this is a college town and most of them were college students not too much younger than I was at the time. One of the comedians in the group blurted out "Oh, you're such a Dad"! Well, it stuck and it spread. I can't tell you how many people call me Dad to this day that were not even there. Again, it's all in fun. When my wife calls me Dad, I know that I am OK. When she calls me "BRUCE!", uh-oh!:eek:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,392 Posts
Ultra-Hog, I needed you to teach me that when I was young. I have done OK for myself, but through a much harder path. thinkinblue, I hope you can digest the good advice that has been offered here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all of your advice! Everyone... I know the majority of you all said for me to get a used or regular sedan or a 2 door/2 seat only vehicle... BUT... (good news)

My mom and I went to our local dealership and TADA! The Ridgeline RTL had a special offer on my to be leased ($228/36 months which ended today). My mom originally wanted to go there to check out the Civic LX which is a nice car for me (to buy it, $19,000)... But she thought about the Ridgeline and thinking about how getting a Ridgeline for a special price and how the family can benefit and utilize the truck.

SO.. not until tomorrow, when the deal will be finalized! I'm just wondering if it was a good choice. My mom likes the Blue one and I think it looks great in blue! :rolleyes: Hope its a good buy!
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
thinkinblue said:
Thanks for all of your advice! Everyone... I know the majority of you all said for me to get a used or regular sedan or a 2 door/2 seat only vehicle... BUT... (good news)

My mom and I went to our local dealership and TADA! The Ridgeline RTL had a special offer on my to be leased ($228/36 months which ended today). My mom originally wanted to go there to check out the Civic LX which is a nice car for me (to buy it, $19,000)... But she thought about the Ridgeline and thinking about how getting a Ridgeline for a special price and how the family can benefit and utilize the truck.

SO.. not until tomorrow, when the deal will be finalized! I'm just wondering if it was a good choice. My mom likes the Blue one and I think it looks great in blue! :rolleyes: Hope its a good buy!
Sounds great. Congratulations and welcome to the ROC family.
Enjoy the ride.
NOW...for some Motherly advice whether you want it or not. :D
Be careful, be safe, think and drive don't drink and drive, and above all, respect your Mother. Do all of these things and life will be grand for you.
:)
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top