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Does anyone know if the K&N 33-2200 (3.5L 2005 Pilot application) will fit the Ridgeline? I have seen a photo of it, & it looks real close... but no auto parts stores carry it and I'd have to special order it, which means no returns if it doesn't fit.
 

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No, it is to short. My buddy has a speed shop here in Houston and we ordered it and looks close, 1' to short. He called K&N and they will have in stock at the end of Sept, so they told him.
 

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If all you replaced was the filter, probably not.
The paper filter these days perform pretty well.

Now if you change the entire intake, you could gain some power...
 

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Unless the K&N filter is maintained perfectly, and that means almost weekly checking for the proper amount of lube, etc., minute dirt particcles will pass through. This will not happen with paper filters.
 

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The best air filter study I know of is the ISO 5011 Duramax study. The subject engine is of little consequence since it's a test of filter efficiency.

The standard AC Delco OEM filter was 99.93% efficient to 2.5 microns. The K&N filter was the worst tested and was only 96.8% efficient. This was with a perfectly oiled K&N air filter. The efficiency of a K&N air filter drops off rapidly with use as they have exceptionally low dirt capacity. I think K&N only claims a 90% efficiency, but my memory may be off in this respect.

How much dirt could the filter hold before being clogged? The AC Delco OEM filter could hold 573.9 grams of dirt before being completely clogged. The K&N could only hold 211.6 grams. Less than half the capacity before clogging. An interesting note is that the only filter worse than the K&N was the Amsoil filter.

Accumulated gain... this is how much dirt the filter let pass during the test. The AC Delco OEM filter allowed 0.4 grams of measurable dirt to pass during the test. The K&N allowed a massive 7.0 grams of dirt to pass!

K&N makes their performance claims based on low air restriction. Without going into all the details this claim ONLY works IF the OEM filter is too restrictive. If the OEM filter will flow air equal to or greater than the CFM required by the engine NO PERFORMANCE GAIN IS POSSIBLE. I do not believe that there's a modern vehicle that can out breathe a clean OEM filter.

Now how does this result in lower engine life? Take a look at the accumulated gain paragraph above. Those additional 6.6 grams of dirt the K&N filter allowed to enter the engine will cause wear. Every bit of dirt that enters the cylinder adds up. Dirt is just as good as sandpaper over time. The result is guaranteed.
 

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I agree that K&N filters do not filter as well. But I have always wondered how much additional wear they could be adding to the engine. Let's take a typical honda 4 cylinder. 250,000 miles is easy to do if it's been taken care of, ie oilchanges, tune ups. Now, what decrease in life are we talking about? to 200k? 240k? etc. At some point, I decided that if I can "only" get 200k out of my B18C1(integra GSR motor) on a cold air intake with K&N, I suppose I am ok with that.
 

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shingles said:
I agree that K&N filters do not filter as well. But I have always wondered how much additional wear they could be adding to the engine. Let's take a typical honda 4 cylinder. 250,000 miles is easy to do if it's been taken care of, ie oilchanges, tune ups. Now, what decrease in life are we talking about? to 200k? 240k? etc. At some point, I decided that if I can "only" get 200k out of my B18C1(integra GSR motor) on a cold air intake with K&N, I suppose I am ok with that.
OK, so you've decided to pay a premium price for a K&N air filter. You are willing to accept reduced engine life. These are big costs in my opinion.

What do you think you are gaining? What are be benefits? You are not getting any additional horsepower. You are not getting better fuel mileage. The only tests that show improvements in horsepower and mileage are the private tests K&N does. The independent tests don't back up the claims. For there to be an increase in power or mileage would require the OEM filter to be too restrictive for the engine. That's just not going to happen.

So the bottom line is that you have significant costs by using the K&N air filter, and no benefits. I guess that's OK... your choice, but don't fool yourself into believing the wild K&N claims.

There's on thing for sure... that K&N air filter is doing its best to fill your cold air intake full of crud.
 
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