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FYI - I gave up browsing through more than 250 pages on my phone.

2 months ago, I replace my burnt out tail/brake bulbs with Pilot LED bulbs. All seemed fine when I tested them, when I was done. Then on Tuesday, I noticed that my Rdgeline's reflection showed that my front corner lights were on, with the control switch/knob was off. Double/Triple checked all switches/knobs. As soon as I released the brake pedal, the lights went off. Went to AutoZone today, bought some standard bulbs, and the problem is solved.
 

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Cheap leds are cheap leds and cause alot of problems. Go with superbrightleds.com or theretrofitsource.com and you should be fine.
 

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2007 Nimbus Grey Metallic RTL
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Tried this myself. I used inexpensive LED's in the tails and it caused my 3rd brake light to be on all the time. Using LED's in the 3rd brake light and reverse lights caused no ill effect, but I still have standard bulbs in the tails. The RL electrical system is apparently very sensitive to different load levels with lighting.
 

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I had this problem w dual intensity LEDs. INSTALL A DIODE INLINE to keep voltage from feeding back into the other wire that controls the bright/dim function of the LED. (I.E. Turn signal or brake LEDs that get brighter than the running(park) lights. When brake/turn-signal is on they would bleed to the park lights when they were switched off(daytime driving). I had to install 2 diodes per front turn signal bulb on my Civic and it solved that problem. My Pilot- was the rear signal and brake bulbs that needed DIODEs after LED conversion. This happens since these vehicles were designed for the old halogen with 2 separate coils inside-almost acting like 2 bulbs in one.
Diodes were $6 for a 100 pack on Amazon site! Good luck!

I know LEDs are diodes but dual intensity LEDs bleed since those to wires go back together before the actual LED light after the resistor which allows the voltage to bleed back to the other wire.
 
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