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I just got a quote from the local Leer distributor for the 100XR with roof rails; A little over $4000 (Cdn) installed. That's almost 10% of the cost of the vehicle and the only moving parts are 2 hinges and sliding windows!!
Wow, that's even higher than the ARE. But then my ARE leaks. :mad:
 

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I've had quotes of over $4000 (Cdn) for both Leer XR and the A.R.E. -Z. The Softopper is looking better all the time. Now if I could only figure out a way to get 2 kayaks on a softopper.
I know this post is dated but just saw it. I use a bed extender to carry my 2 kayaks in a 19 Sport...one of those steel rack things that plugs into the trailer hitch and costs about $70 on Amazon. Works like a charm!
 

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Do they modify or move the existing Honda tie downs to attached the Leer hardware to hold the cap down?
 

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2020 Honda Ridgeline RTL
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Do they modify or move the existing Honda tie downs to attached the Leer hardware to hold the cap down?
the upper tie downs are replaced, they have a hole for bolt that holds cap. tie downs came with cap, and i got the original tie downs back
 

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the upper tie downs are replaced, they have a hole for bolt that holds cap. tie downs came with cap, and i got the original tie downs back
other than the additional hole they look like original tie downs, alittle larger, mounted at same location
 

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That looks very nice. Please let us know how well the topper keeps out the rain and melting snow.
Had my Leer 100XL installed by dealer 2-2-2021. He said Leer provided specific instructions and materials on how to fill the gaps created by the top rails on the sides of the bed meeting with the top of the bed underneath the back window. I had previously covered mine with a pliable weather-strip putty from Frost King (see light gray putty in picture). I also filled the other gap perpendicular to the back window, after this picture was taken.

As you can see from the other picture taken from inside the bed and under the corner of the cap, Leer replaced my weather-strip putty with their black flexible material that seems like butyl. It protrudes all the way to the inside edge of the cap. They also use a bulb weather-strip seal under the cap, it looks high quality, its about one inch thick and in cross section looks like a capital letter “B”, so it actually has twin cavities to provide a seal and a back-up seal. The top ledge across the front of the bed is fairly narrow, part of the bulb seal is protrudes inside the bed, as you can also see from the pictures I took up underneath the front edge of the cap from inside the bed.

The night after it was installed, the truck sat outside, stationary, in a light rain for about an hour. As you can see a few ounces of water accumulated in the corners. You can’t see it running down the inside of the bed, so I can only assume it is coming down on the outside of the inner composite vertical bed panels, and dripping off the bottom onto the floor of the bed and immediately draining off into the hole in the corner.

I get the impression that it is water that is running off the roof, down the back window of the truck (and the front window of the cap), and onto the to ledge of the front bed panel on the outside of the cap, and from there it has to run to each corner to escape since there is no gap between the cab and the bed. When it gets to each corner it still must seep in behind the composite inner bed panels somehow, no matter how well those seams are sealed.

After the rain, I took some tape and covered across all gaps between the cab and the back window shroud, and between the back window shroud and the Leer cap. I also covered all down the sides all the way past the bottom of the cap. This should have completely sealed between the cab and cap.

I then ran a mist of water with a hose over the top of the truck to simulate light rain. Looking through the back window, I still saw a little water dripping down the back window of the truck in front of the front window of the cap. Somehow water still gets in somewhere. And it was still coming into the front corners of the inside of the bed.

I then removed the tape, and hosed the sides of the truck, and the water was still there, but no worse. So, I don’t believe the water is getting into the cap by blowing down the sides of the truck when driving down the highway. I think it accumulates across the top exterior edge of the front bed panel, in the small gap between front of the cap and the back window, then draining off to either side and finding a hairline opening along the panel mating surfaces at the front corners of the top of the bed rails. From there it works its way down the outward side of the inner composite vertical bed panels. The amount of water coming in seems to be the same whether sitting still in a rain, or driving down the road.

Bottom line: I don’t think any cap, Leer or A.R.E. is going to be watertight, but water appearing in the two front corners and immediately draining out is not a concern to me, even with luggage in there. Frankly I can’t put anything right up against that corner due to the tie-down cleat bolted to the bed floor. I have a rubber-backed 4’x6’ outdoor rug in the bed, and if there was excessive water it would just drain under the rug in between the corrugated ridges on the floor.

IMG_0253.JPG IMG_0194.JPG IMG_0555.JPG IMG_0555a.jpg IMG_0556.JPG IMG_0557.JPG IMG_0558.JPG IMG_0561.JPG IMG_0535.JPG
 

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That's quite a thorough investigation you performed. Your results are consistent with my observations. If water is accumulating along the top edge of the front bed panel and then seeping into the bed panels at the outside front corners, I'm wondering if sealing the weep holes/slits which run to the base of the back window is counter productive? You don't want water running backward under the cap's bulb seal, but maybe it's OK for water to drain forward through the weep holes. On the other hand, if that water also drains down to the front of the bed before exiting through the forward drain holes, you're no better off (and maybe wetter).
 

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Hmmmm...good point - if you don't seal the weep holes/slits which run perpendicular to the base of the back window (from the bed), the water drains straight down to the ground. If you put a light over those slits, and then crawl under the truck, you can see its a straight path down. So I am wonder if they should be seal from the front edge of the bed just part way back, with a pencil size opening left right next to the base of the rear window? Perhaps some water would cling to the outside or hidden side of the front bed panel, and appear at the bottom of the panel like it does in the corners, but that should be of little issue as there are drain holes in the bed all along the front.
Anyway, its too late to try that on mine since the cap is on, although I may be able to go from underneath the truck back up and put a little hole thru the sealing putty or whatever they used.
Also keep in mind the center of that top rail has a slight sag in it, as many have reported. If you lay a 5 foot straight edge along the top of that front rail you will see a slight gap under the straight edge. So report 1/8" , mine was closer to 3/16" at the middle, which would cause rain to keep a slight puddle in the middle before it ran off to each corner.
 

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Hmmmm...good point - if you don't seal the weep holes/slits which run perpendicular to the base of the back window (from the bed), the water drains straight down to the ground. If you put a light over those slits, and then crawl under the truck, you can see its a straight path down. So I am wonder if they should be seal from the front edge of the bed just part way back, with a pencil size opening left right next to the base of the rear window? Perhaps some water would cling to the outside or hidden side of the front bed panel, and appear at the bottom of the panel like it does in the corners, but that should be of little issue as there are drain holes in the bed all along the front.
Anyway, its too late to try that on mine since the cap is on, although I may be able to go from underneath the truck back up and put a little hole thru the sealing putty or whatever they used.
Also keep in mind the center of that top rail has a slight sag in it, as many have reported. If you lay a 5 foot straight edge along the top of that front rail you will see a slight gap under the straight edge. So report 1/8" , mine was closer to 3/16" at the middle, which would cause rain to keep a slight puddle in the middle before it ran off to each corner.
Thats a disappointing color match of the top. Why not reject it until they get the right paint tint? Even Honda has several shades of Silver.
 

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It may be the lighting because I think it looks pretty good in person. I provided Leer my paint code and VIN, and Leer paints at the factory to match the code before they ship the cap. However, Leer provides a written warning with every cap about color matching. It says even with the same formulation of colors, quantity of metal flake (for metallics such as silver and gray) and same paint manufacturer, there can still be slight variations due to the amount of mixing and settling that can occur during the spray process, different spray guns, different primers underneath, different surfaces being painted (metal vs fiberglass, etc), different thickness and coats of the paint, age of the paint (4 year old truck weathering vs new cap), etc, etc. Not saying I agree, or disagree, I am just saying that warning comes with every cap.
 

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The Leer warning about matching metallic paints seems legit to me. Even the best body shops typically "blend" repainted panels into adjacent panels by overspraying. The slightly imperfect match of my cap doesn't concern me.
 

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Hmmmm...good point - if you don't seal the weep holes/slits which run perpendicular to the base of the back window (from the bed), the water drains straight down to the ground. If you put a light over those slits, and then crawl under the truck, you can see its a straight path down. So I am wonder if they should be seal from the front edge of the bed just part way back, with a pencil size opening left right next to the base of the rear window? Perhaps some water would cling to the outside or hidden side of the front bed panel, and appear at the bottom of the panel like it does in the corners, but that should be of little issue as there are drain holes in the bed all along the front...
I think leaving the two weep holes open only at the base of the window would make sense, but it's too late for me to try that as well. I knew about the sag in the top rail but did not measure mine before the cap went on. I can open the front window of the cap and check for puddling in the sag when I wash the truck. And because the entire front window of my cap is removable for cleaning, I might be able to reach the weep holes and open them at the base of the truck's back window. Maybe...
 

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Here is another tip that might help prevent water intrusion, since some of it seems to come from water laying on, or running along the small amount of front top rail of the bed that is still exposed after the cap is on. On my cap, I ordered the removable front window, so I could access and wash the back window of the truck and the front window of the cap. I removed that window and stuffed backer rod used to fill concrete cracks in driveways (sometimes called caulk saver if used as weather-stripping on a house).
It is made by a variety of companies and can be found in the concrete or weather-stripping sections of any hardware or building supply store. The smallest roll is about 20-foot roll and costs about $6.
The backer rod comes in various diameters from ¼” up to 1” (although stores only carry a few common sizes so you may have to search on-line for unusual sizes). You want a size slightly bigger than your gap, so you can compress and wedge it in for a tight fit. For mine, 5/8 inch was the right size. I would guess most Leer caps would require a backer rod size of 1/2, 5/8 or 3/4 inch diameter after install.
Push one end into the gap with your fingers as far to the edge as you can, and work your way to the other side. You don’t have to push it all the way to the bottom, just wedge it enough so that it stays on its own, and allows any water running down between the truck window and cap window to run off the top of the backer rod to drain off to the sides before getting to the top rail. Its not perfect, but it does seem to reduce the amount of water that gets into the bed near the front of the cap.
I included one picture of the backer rod partially installed as I was pushing it into the gap across the outside of the front of the cap (from inside the cap with the front window removed).


IMG_0590.JPG IMG_0594.JPG backer rod 2.jpg backer rod4.jpg
 

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I also found that it helps to drill a few more drain holes along the edge of the bed floor, since there are none along the sides between the front corner and the tailgate. I put one in front of the wheel hump on the floor of the bed, in the corner. This allows any water that is not drained by the front corner hole, and running back along the edge, to drain out before it puddles in front of the wheel hump and then drains back thru the bed looking for an outlet at the tailgate-bed gap. This kind of water path can happen when you are parked on an upward slope, climbing a hill, or pulling a wheelie :)
IMG_0599a.jpg
 

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Hmmmm...good point - if you don't seal the weep holes/slits which run perpendicular to the base of the back window (from the bed), the water drains straight down to the ground. If you put a light over those slits, and then crawl under the truck, you can see its a straight path down. So I am wonder if they should be seal from the front edge of the bed just part way back, with a pencil size opening left right next to the base of the rear window? Perhaps some water would cling to the outside or hidden side of the front bed panel, and appear at the bottom of the panel like it does in the corners, but that should be of little issue as there are drain holes in the bed all along the front.
Anyway, its too late to try that on mine since the cap is on, although I may be able to go from underneath the truck back up and put a little hole thru the sealing putty or whatever they used.
Also keep in mind the center of that top rail has a slight sag in it, as many have reported. If you lay a 5 foot straight edge along the top of that front rail you will see a slight gap under the straight edge. So report 1/8" , mine was closer to 3/16" at the middle, which would cause rain to keep a slight puddle in the middle before it ran off to each corner.
Thanks for all your posts and pics. My 2018 Ridgeline and 2018 LEER has been leaking ever since purchase. [I was made aware by the dealer that they are hard to seal and that they would not guarantee water-tightness.] It was slight at first but since it has gotten worse. Leaks have been at the front end (up between cab and bed) at the cap and bed top edge. Since it was minor at first, I have lived with it. I have resorted to using a plastic tarp to protect water sensitive items when I am packing the thing to the gills but that is a relative pain. Since it has gotten worse, I figured it was time to try to get a better seal. I have been looking at threads to see if anyone has posted any miracle cures but...

I removed all the butyl putty that was used to fully plug the up front weep holes thinking that getting them free would move water more effectively from the area. Now I know that the front weep holes need to be fully plugged because a portion of water running down the weep holes also comes directly into the front of the bed from behind the front bed panel. Not sure why that happens but it does. The installer used butyl-rubber caulk strips to plug the weep holes and all the panel joints. There are two overlap joints at the ends of the front bed panel and two lap joints off the sides, all at the top of the bed . Since I think that some of the leak is do to interface gap between cap (not perfectly flat, as you have noted) and bed, I am thinking about laying on a couple of closed cell foam strips ("bed cap sealer tape") to build the seal up in that area to fill in the gaps and compress better since the LEER supplied silicone-rubber gasket doesn't seem to be fully doing it. I also thought about trying to use some foam to redirect the water away from the front cap and cab seam as you have suggested in your post on backer bar. I grabbed some closed-cell neoprene pipe insulation to try but didn't think of the backer bar. Regardless, I am going to use something to try to redirect water towards the sides of the truck once I get the cap reset. I have requested installation instructions and any update from LEER but based on everything I have read here on the HROC, I am certainly not holding my breath awaiting their reply.

If you have any suggestions, I'd be happy to hear about them.
 

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If it runs down the front bedwall, and immediately drains out the bottom thru the drain holes, or comes in the corners where the side panels and front panels meet, and runs down those panel seems and immediately drains out the corner drains, I am content and figure that's as good as it gets. It stays off the floor of the bed the way mine is set up, and I have a 4'x6' outdoor rubber back carpet mat from Lowes ($25) on the floor anyway (place it a few inches short of the front of the bed), so would just trickle under it. It is usually only about 1/2 cup of water in each corner during a hard rain, and more comes in parked than going down the road with 60 mph air blowing the rain over the top.
 

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Its not bad. It is not restricted left or right, as the edges of the headrests block the left and right side of the rear view mirror "view" anyway. But it is a little bit narrower in the horizontal field of vision, like having a 2x4 across the top of your tailgate - it sort of blocks the view of anything up close to your bumper. But Ridgelines have a back up camera. The biggest issue to me is that all Leer cap models have a tinted back window, no way to order without. So you are looking thru a tinted Ridgeline window in the rear of the cab, and a tinted window in the cap, and its pretty dark, although that helps to reduce the glare of headlights in your rear view mirror at night.
 

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How is visibility out of the back with the rear view mirror with these caps?
t321sg comments were pretty much right on. The low roof line, extra cab length of the Ridgeline, and "compounded" effect of the deeper window tinting through all the layers make visibility through the cap definitely less than what my previous LEER (Ford Ranger Extended cab) and ARE cap (Ford SportTrac) were like. The bottom of the rear lift-window at the tailgate does reduce the view because of its thickness/width and the blackout around the perimeter of the window and on a large portion near the latch control further reduces view. At night time, headlights from vehicles following you aren't usually an issue;). I do use/depend on the BU camera (and side mirrors, as noted.) I would have to say that the visibility while it is definitely not optimal, it isn't a killer issue for me, all things considered. I do like the cap. The design is so fluid and integrates so well that when I first got the Ridgeline and cap, some people thought it was a new Honda SUV at first glance.
 
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