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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Yes, an SUV does suit my needs better, or at least just as well, but that does not mean I can't have both. In fact, I owned both the Ridgeline and the ML350 for around six months before selling the Ridge to my buddy who insisted I sell it to him. If it were not for him I probably would still have them both.

I like trucks for a lot of reasons and sitting up tall overlooking traffic is one of them and the Ridgeline sat much taller, or so it seemed, than my previous mid-size truck, the Dodge Dakota. I liked that view from the Ridgeline a lot. I have had sedans too and I have learned to hate how low they put you. I will probably never own another sedan for that reason alone.

The Ridgeline was built for my needs and desires which are different (as I explained previously) in several ways from many truck buyers. It had to be unique and the first generation's innovation struck me right away as a very practical, thinking man's truck, unlike normal, work and utility trucks that have come before. I loved the two way tail gate and the unique unibody construction gave a car like ride and room for five easily - yet if fit in my garage perfectly. All the storage in the cabin was a big plus, as was the fold up rear seats. The in-bed trunk was Honda thinking and innovation at its best and something we have not seen much of since from that company. I used all these features time and again and they were not found on trucks, SUV's or any other kind of vehicle at the time. Did I "need" them? No. But they were great to have. It was a compilation of many factors that I really liked in a motor vehicle and it just so happened to have an open bed - that it was indeed a truck was the bonus.

I'm with you brother for all those and more reasons..... I'm not so sure I would have answered the ? "Why are you interested in a truck at all" as nice as you did.... maybe to me it's just the way he presented it to you ?? :act035:
 

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Well RTLagtor, I suppose it was a legitimate question considering what I had said previously and as such, he was entitled to an answer and response. I agree with you that his choice of words might have been a little different than I would have used in asking the question but I am probably much older than he is. I could be wrong about that of course but generally I find it is younger people who do not always take their time in choosing the appropriate words and phrases to address someone. So I see it all the time and pay no attention to it - no harm, no foul as far as I'm concerned.
 

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"Exclusivity"??? How do end up owning a Honda?
How did I end up owning a Honda? Keep in mind this is not just any Honda - it is a Ridgeline! Perhaps one of the most exclusive vehicles around if you look at the numbers. If we were talking Civic or Accord or even Odyssey I would agree that the term "exclusivity" could not possibly apply, even in a stretch. But it is spot on when talking about the Ridgeline. It is a "niche" vehicle, a true cult classic much like the movie "Night of the Living Dead". In 30 years it will be worth far more than any F150 on the road today. It has a place, a very exclusive place, in the truck market. It simply is not understood by most mere mortals. But we here are different and know better. Right?

Take a look here: http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/p/sales-stats.html. If you punch in the Ridgeline you will find that last year's sales stats show 13,389 trucks sold. Now, punch in the MB M class that I bought (and that some people consider "exclusive") and you will find that Mercedes sold 46,726 of them during the same 2014 sales year - more than three times as many! This holds true for virtually every year the Ridgeline and the M series have been in existence.

So, I suppose it is all about how we define "exclusivity". Some people define it by using factors such as brand name, price paid, implied badge status, etc. But certainly one of the most important aspects of that term which we can put a finger on is how many are actually on the road in the hands of drivers. In other words, which vehicles do you see often and which are seen rarely? In that regard the Ridgeline wins hands down as not only one of the most "exclusive" trucks in America but one of the most exclusive vehicles period. Would you agree?
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I totally agree with you Mr Shortspark, when I bought mine in late 2006 I told some close friends that it was a special vehicle and exclusive to only a few, they laughed.... after they rode in it they agreed and for a long time I never viewed many on the roads as I drove around parts of Florida. When i did see one I would think now there is another exclusive member :act030: I have not lost that feeling after almost 8 years and every time I drive it I tend to smile just a little... I retired back then and really don't drive too much as I have several other Honda's....but I don't really drive the others too much as one is a garage queen (S2000 ) and the other (Crosstour) is parked at condo about 80 miles from me at the beach. I do take all to Honda dealer and have meet some salesman over the years and they are always saying it's time to trade, my response is why? I have absolutely no reason at this point...... I think the 2nd generation will have the same effect on me as the first.......
 

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Exactly RTLgator! I was one of the first to have a Ridgeline in the East Texas area which is a place of big Fords, Silverados and Rams. But this is oil field and ranch country and these are the kinds of vehicles you need here. Nonetheless, everywhere I went people were giving me the thumbs up and stopping to look at it. I came out of a grocery store one day and three different people were looking at it and of course I showed them all the bells and whistles. They were all very impressed and then one got in his truck and left - a massive, black Escalade EXT!

That died down some by the time I sold it but my buddy who now owns the vehicle says he still gets the looks every now and then and people still ask him questions about it. I can drive around in my Mercedes all day long and no one notices - and I like it that way. I felt more "exclusive" in my Ridgeline than I ever have in the Mercedes. I have a picture I'll paste that I hope comes out of when I owned them both.

Maybe this new Mercedes truck will be the cat's meow but I'm not holding my breath that it will even be introduced in America because Mercedes has foreign markets in mind where the mid-size segment is far more popular than here. Like you, I hope the second generation Ridgeline is even better than the first but something tells me I won't be as impressed this time around as I was ten years ago. I hope I'm wrong because I would love to have another Ridgeline and is the main reason I still keep up with its development at this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·


Here is picture I posted several years ago titled little sister/big brother....they make a perfect pair......
 

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How did I end up owning a Honda? Keep in mind this is not just any Honda - it is a Ridgeline! Perhaps one of the most exclusive vehicles around if you look at the numbers. If we were talking Civic or Accord or even Odyssey I would agree that the term "exclusivity" could not possibly apply, even in a stretch. But it is spot on when talking about the Ridgeline. It is a "niche" vehicle, a true cult classic much like the movie "Night of the Living Dead". In 30 years it will be worth far more than any F150 on the road today. It has a place, a very exclusive place, in the truck market. It simply is not understood by most mere mortals. But we here are different and know better. Right?

Take a look here: http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/p/sales-stats.html. If you punch in the Ridgeline you will find that last year's sales stats show 13,389 trucks sold. Now, punch in the MB M class that I bought (and that some people consider "exclusive") and you will find that Mercedes sold 46,726 of them during the same 2014 sales year - more than three times as many! This holds true for virtually every year the Ridgeline and the M series have been in existence.

So, I suppose it is all about how we define "exclusivity". Some people define it by using factors such as brand name, price paid, implied badge status, etc. But certainly one of the most important aspects of that term which we can put a finger on is how many are actually on the road in the hands of drivers. In other words, which vehicles do you see often and which are seen rarely? In that regard the Ridgeline wins hands down as not only one of the most "exclusive" trucks in America but one of the most exclusive vehicles period. Would you agree?
OK... I DO agree with your points in the reply above; but they seem a bit removed from the original context/use of the term "exclusivity".
As here:
"I want the truck to be luxurious and have a badge of distinction with the uniqueness and exclusivity that goes along with that. And of course it has to be expensive and overpriced to have those things because they go hand in hand. In the end, it is only money."

I may have misunderstood, but THAT statement certainly implied exclusivity as to mean everyone cannot have one, as opposed to simply meaning unique. Expensive and Overpriced may apply to "exclusive", but they certainly are not required for "uniqueness".

No question the RL stands out & is a superb, if not universally appreciated, vehicle. Good reason to buy one.
Myself, I could never see the attraction of something just because it was expensive, carried a certain badge, or held higher "status". As a matter of fact, there are countless examples of "prestige" vehicles that weren't worth a damn in the reliability department.... and in turn cost a fortune to keep maintained. A little perverse if you ask me. I don't count Mercedes in that group. But with respect to being "unique", I would say their primary model groups are less unique than the Ridgeline....

So is it unique or exclusive. Different terms. I can respect wanting to own the Mercedes truck to get a unique vehicle, much like the RL. But that would be because that truck would indeed be unique, not just because it carries the Mercedes badge. Otherwise, you're buying into the "prestige" definition of exclusivity, as opposed to the "unique" definition. Nothing wrong with chasing prestige, if that's what spins your wheel. Just didn't see the connection to our more pragmatic RL. All depends on how you view "value".

Boy am I splitting hairs..... but just thought maybe I should clarify my original meaning when questioning how "exclusivity" put you in a Honda.
 

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To each, his own. The luxury and upgraded features of Mercedes are appealing, for sure, but even though it's "just money", being smart about how one uses their hard-earned money is of great concern to me. Everyone has different wants and needs in a vehicle and the Mercedes suits you. It just doesn't appeal to me to pay $60k+ (est.) for that vehicle when I can have a perfectly capable RL for almost half that price. Nevertheless, that's the glory of opinion and taste - you can have whatever you want!
 

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Maybe we can retrofit some of those MB truck seats into our RL??? I'm guessing they'll be a notch or two beyond ours. :act024:
That is likely something on which we can all agree. I don't mind the RL seats for the type of driving I do. They're like big easy chairs for long drives, but the bolstering leaves a lot to be desired. One quick right turn and my hip is into the door.
 

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That is exactly right, to each his own - one man's trash is another's treasure. The seats in my Mercedes SUV are quite good and support me much better than the Ridgeline. But then again they should because (as you say Ian), the thing cost twice as much.

I am sure that if this truck comes to America it will be priced quite high, especially for a mid-size. For this reason alone, I don't think they will be much in demand but will fill a niche, much the same as the Ridgeline hoped to do. The difference is that Mercedes will know how to promote it whereas with Honda, the poor Ridgeline seemed to be an afterthought after the first few months of its introduction.
 

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Any speculation as to why Mercedes will be building the truck in Mexico? Seems that if they didn't intend for it to populate the U.S. market, they may have been able to build it cheaper in, say, Thailand. That is Ford's game plan with their global Ranger.
 

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That is exactly right, to each his own - one man's trash is another's treasure. The seats in my Mercedes SUV are quite good and support me much better than the Ridgeline. But then again they should because (as you say Ian), the thing cost twice as much.

I am sure that if this truck comes to America it will be priced quite high, especially for a mid-size. For this reason alone, I don't think they will be much in demand but will fill a niche, much the same as the Ridgeline hoped to do. The difference is that Mercedes will know how to promote it whereas with Honda, the poor Ridgeline seemed to be an afterthought after the first few months of its introduction.
I honestly think the Ridgeline was just a victim of Honda not having nearly enough production capacity to build four high-demand vehicles in the same plant (Alabama). The Pilot and Odyssey are strong sellers as well as the MDX. The Ridgeline was a line-filler that was only built a few days a month. Honda couldn't build them, so they didn't advertise them in hopes that the interest would lessen and level off - which is exactly what it did.

A similar thing is happening at Chevrolet right now. I've been intently following the progress of the Chevy SS - not the Camaro SS, but the completely different model known as the SS that is built by Holden in Australia. It is, without a doubt, one of the best vehicles in the GM lineup and that includes the Corvette. It's extremely well-built, it handles really well, rides well, accelerates and brakes at alarming rates and has four doors. The only reason it's here is because GM wanted to use the design for Nascar. They took the Holden Commodore SSV Redline straight from Australia, threw an LS3 V8 in it, changed a few badges and other small knick knacks and brought it here. Hardly no one knows about this car because it isn't advertised. No attention is given to it by GM at all because they're hoping to use the architecture and qualities of the car and mesh it into one of their other lines (like the Impala or Malibu) in the upcoming years. The Holden engineers built a fantastic car that the Detroit guys just can't seem to match, but GM doesn't want the competition with their Camaro. It's a shame, really.
 

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Any speculation as to why Mercedes will be building the truck in Mexico? Seems that if they didn't intend for it to populate the U.S. market, they may have been able to build it cheaper in, say, Thailand. That is Ford's game plan with their global Ranger.
If I recall correctly, I believe I read here that Mexico or Canada gets them past the "chicken tax" on trucks.
 

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I've been reading up a little on the Mercedes truck. It has been given the go-ahead for production for the world market, but no decision for the U.S yet. If sold in the U.S, it will be as a luxury mid-size, competing with Tacoma, but more upscale, with projected sales of 10,000 units per year. For the rest of the world, it will be a more utilitarian one-ton truck, competing with Hilux and VW Amarok. It will be based on the Nissan NP300 Navara truck, which looks pretty sweet. The Navara will be offered with 4- and 6-cylinder gas and diesel options, 7-spd auto or 6-spd manual. Base engine is 2.5L turbodiesel 4-cylinder with 188hp and 332ft-lb torque. This truck will also be the basis for the next redesign on the Nissan Frontier.

So, in a nutshell, the Mercedes GLT will basically be a truck with Ridgeline-like ride and comfort, but with hauling/towing capabilities exceeding the Tacoma (and maybe some full-size trucks). We should know by the end of the year if it will be sold in the U.S.
 
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