Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We have a 2019 Ridgeline RTL-E 4WD and are looking to purchase a R-Pod 192 travel trailer with a total dry weight of 3400 and anticipate cargo, us, hitch, etc. to add 500lbs. (this includes the allowance of 150lbs each that Honda allows for) - so all together we would be at roughly 3,900 lbs. We will tow in the NC mountains at times. We are looking for input from people who have G2 Ridgelines that have experience towing travel trailers ONLY. Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Ruth - I have a 2019 E and tow an Airstream Basecamp X with nearly the same weight you describe. I am a first time truck and camper owner and never towed anything before. So far, my trips have been from Baltimore into hilly central PA and down I-81 into the George Washington Forest. Thus, fairly limited experience. I have had zero issues and never felt like I'm overloading the truck. There are times when I lose speed on hills and the truck downshifts, but I would expect that given the package. Let me know if you have any specific questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you so much - Do you have a sway control hitch? Have you experienced much sway on the interstate when semis go by?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Ruth: I have 2019 RTL-E. I pull A Forrest River Micro Lite. She is right at 4800 on the scales. I use a Fastway E2 hitch for weight distribution and sway control. The WDH pushing some weight to the front axle, and makes the numbers line up pretty nicely. No issues towing in flat Florida. Our last trip had the biggest hills around Florida, and the truck did fine- but still mostly flat. Gas mileage dropping down to around 12mpg. The truck does really well. It is just unnerving feeling like you are making a risky decision. Go watch some of the ridgeline tow testing videos on YouTube. It will make you feel better about what the truck can do. The mountain torture test is pretty good- pulling 5k Water tank I think. Most big trucks are fine, but the boxy ones definitely let you know when they are passing. I watch for them in the mirror.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
Our trailer is only 1300 pounds but we have experienced the issue where the transmission does not downshift into first gear going down hills, so if you get into a situation under 30 MPH or so on a road with steep inclines you will not be able to depend on your transmission and will have only your brakes, (hopefully both vehicular and trailer), to keep everything under control.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
923 Posts
I'm not sure what kind of confirmation you are looking for.

We tow 5k plus pound TT with our G2. It tows like a dream.

I don't condone what we do, but I will say I am very experienced at towing. You do what is prudent and that you are comfortable with. Tow at your experience level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Our trailer is only 1300 pounds but we have experienced the issue where the transmission does not downshift into first gear going down hills, so if you get into a situation under 30 MPH or so on a road with steep inclines you will not be able to depend on your transmission and will have only your brakes, (hopefully both vehicular and trailer), to keep everything under control.

Bill
Darn near died years ago from over heated brakes. I will not tow without trailer brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hi Ruth. We have a 2017 RTL-E awd and towing a 2017 Micro-Lite as well. This trailer is pushing the upper limit of the recommeded tow capacity of the Honda (5000 lb) but it tows it just fine. We have not used a weight distributing hitch at this time and towed it In September over 1000 miles from Florida to Tenn and back with no problems. We stay off the Interstates as much as possible and limit our speed to 65mph max. The truck definitely needs to run in D4 as it will not pull in 5th gear without shifting up & down all the time. Gas mileage is in the 11 mpg range, which I don't like, but it tows right along with no problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Hi Ruth. We have a 2017 RTL-E awd and towing a 2017 Micro-Lite as well. This trailer is pushing the upper limit of the recommeded tow capacity of the Honda (5000 lb) but it tows it just fine. We have not used a weight distributing hitch at this time and towed it In September over 1000 miles from Florida to Tenn and back with no problems. We stay off the Interstates as much as possible and limit our speed to 65mph max. The truck definitely needs to run in D4 as it will not pull in 5th gear without shifting up & down all the time. Gas mileage is in the 11 mpg range, which I don't like, but it tows right along with no problem.
I wondered about towing without WDH. The service manager had told me he strongly recommended weight distribution/sway control for anything over 4000 pounds. I haven’t tried mine without it, but it pulls really smoothly with the hitch in place, and absolutely transfers weight from the trailer to the front axel- where I had the most margin. I hadn’t towed much since my early days as a Truck Driver in the Marines. It made me a believer, but adds a few minutes to hook up, and 60 or so pounds to tongue weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
923 Posts
I run a simple round bar WDH set up properly, and it does kinda suck that it adds a lot of weight, but in the end I feel it is worth it.

I have not been running the friction sway bar though. I've been all over in various terrain and wind conditions and have never felt anything of concern.

Even on the interstate at 65 mph semi trucks are of no great concern to me. Still treat with caution of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Hi Ruth
I tow a Winnebago 1808FBS Dry weight 3,560. Loaded with gear It's around 4,600. I use an E2 round bar WDH and Teknosha primus Break controler. I tow all over the rocky mountains of Colorado, NM, AZ and UT. Very Steep grades uphill and downhill I have no problems doing the posted speed limit and that weight. I highly recommend the e2, it really helps on those curvy mountain roads. Let me know if you have any questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
There are some good discussions about towing doesn't seem to be any problems. I worry about stopping!
The little 8" drum brakes on the rear really seem inadequate to stop a trailer.
re: "the transmission does not downshift into first gear going down hills " so manually shift into first gear I do not see a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Similar to RJSAENZ I tow a 1706FB Micro Minnie with a 2019 (and previously a 2013). I havent scaled mine but I am betting we are close to 4500 fully loaded. I have towed all around western pa and into the "mountains" of west virginia and vermont with no issues. I pretty much limit myself to 70ish mph or the speed limit and my mileage has varied from 8-12 mpg. I have a good brake control but I do not use a swaybar or weight distribution and I am ok with this (although this is a tandem axle which greatly helps sway). More often, I also tow an enclosed ATV trailer with no brakes and single axle that weighs upwards of 3500. My mileage towing this is slightly better and the roads I am on are usually slower (55-60mph) so I have seen up to 14mpg. I should note these mpgs are calculated not dash indicated (the dash very rarely matches actual calculated at fill up). I do have quite a bit of experience towing and hold a CDL so what I am comfortable with, others may not be. What you are looking at should be well within the limits of the truck but, be very careful how much stuff you put in it (it is very easy to get overloaded and not realize it).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I tow a 3800 lb Bigfoot 5th wheel (very rare animal) in the mountains of Colorado. With a 5th wheel, the weight sits over the rear axle. Several RV mechanics tell me that because of this weight distribution, you can add another 20% to the rated towing capacity, as long as you have enough power. On steep (6-7%) grades, the tranny will downshift and speed may drop to 45-50 mph. Otherwise, no performance issues. I always manually shift to 2nd gear going down steep grades and rarely need to use brakes. The Bigfoot has its own electric brakes so that is not an issue. You were looking for G2 input only. But my 2014 has the same engine, tranny and brakes as G2. One final thing. Once a year, I have the radiator flushed and the temperature valve replaced as a preventive measure.

Scamp and Escape make a fiberglass 5th wheel. You do need a custom modification so that the hitch rails sit over the bed and bolt directly to the frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
We have a 2019 Ridgeline RTL-E 4WD and are looking to purchase a R-Pod 192 travel trailer with a total dry weight of 3400 and anticipate cargo, us, hitch, etc. to add 500lbs. (this includes the allowance of 150lbs each that Honda allows for) - so all together we would be at roughly 3,900 lbs. We will tow in the NC mountains at times. We are looking for input from people who have G2 Ridgelines that have experience towing travel trailers ONLY. Thank you!
I have a 2007 1G Ridgeline and have been towing stuff for a while and now have 110K on my Ridgeline. Started with a 3500 pound pop up and an now towing a square travel trailer (Rockood Roo) that when loaded is right about at the ridges towing capacity @ 4100 pounds dry and with all my stuff in it is probably around 4800 with a tongue weight around 650, so much less then your Rpod. The ridge is adequate for me and since your Rpod is rounded it should have less air drag so not as much front surface area as I have.

The engine does race some on inclines and downshifts often but it's not obnoxious. Would I take it cross country and over the Rock Mountain passes?? I could but probably could but wouldn't.

Would I like a bigger truck with more horsepower and torque? I certainly would but the ridge is fine for now, tows well and when I run it into the graveyard in another 50K miles, I will probably upgrade to a full size half ton truck since I'm considering buying a bigger trailer.

I think you'll be fine with your Rpod so I'd stick with the ridge. If you feel it's gets squirrely when you're on the road at highway speeds, get a weight distribution hitch with sway control and that will settle it down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
It’s my experience that the towing capabilities will be fine up to the rated towing weight of the truck. As mentioned already, make sure you have trailer brakes, a good brake controller, and that the trailer brakes are working well. On the 6 speed, the inability to control exactly what gear the transmission runs in can be an annoyance, but the truck will still get the job done. Power is not a problem. You’ll probably use D4 a lot, and will shift to L on steep descents. Beware that when towing drags your gas mileage down to the low teens, the small 19 gallon fuel tank on the Ridgeline will have you stopping for fuel every 200 miles or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
There are some good discussions about towing doesn't seem to be any problems. I worry about stopping!
The little 8" drum brakes on the rear really seem inadequate to stop a trailer.
re: "the transmission does not downshift into first gear going down hills " so manually shift into first gear I do not see a problem.
The G2 RL has 13" disk brakes on the rear wheels. The 8" drum brakes you see are the parking brakes. Not meaning to criticize you, just wanted to set the record straight for others reading the forum.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top