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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard some of you say that I should lubricate the brake-caliper slides every time I change the oil. In my Trans Am, for instance, the floating caliper-piston clamp is attached with two bolts (one at each end) to the end of each of the two caliper slides, both of which are enclosed in boots. It seems that to get to the slide to lubricate it, I would have to take off the caliper-piston clamp (the part that you slide off when changing pads) and then wiggle off the caliper-slide boots so that I can slide out the slides and lubricate them before sliding them back in and reinstalling the boots. Is this correct? Is this basically what I'd do with the Ridgeline as well, or do the slides slip out every time you undo the caliper to change the pads?
 

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I've heard some of you say that I should lubricate the brake-caliper slides every time I change the oil. In my Trans Am, for instance, the floating caliper-piston clamp is attached with two bolts (one at each end) to the end of each of the two caliper slides, both of which are enclosed in boots. It seems that to get to the slide to lubricate it, I would have to take off the caliper-piston clamp (the part that you slide off when changing pads) and then wiggle off the caliper-slide boots so that I can slide out the slides and lubricate them before sliding them back in and reinstalling the boots. Is this correct? Is this basically what I'd do with the Ridgeline as well, or do the slides slip out every time you undo the caliper to change the pads?
I asked pretty much the same question in this thread:
http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12808&highlight=Brake+wear&page=4
I got no bites. :(
 

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Thanks for the reply davedad. Please report bad here when you do this. For us guys that don't have a service manual yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I took the brakes apart on my 98 Trans Am. There was not much grease on any of the slides, even though the boots were all fine. BUT, the lower pin on the driver's side was kind of stuck in it's sleeve. I had to cronk it out with locking pliers. There was almost no grease on it and some rust, which I sanded off. Regreased and slides easily now. I'm almost certain nothing has been done to these pins since it was built in 98. So glad I took that apart. I did forget to do the pad ears, but they all seemed to move effortlessly. Maybe I'll do that to one side next year.
 

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According to the SM, Honda recommends the following lubricants whenever performing brake maintenance on your truck:

Honda silicone grease P/N 08C30-B0234M
- Upper/Lower caliper pins
- Pin boots
- Piston boots
- Piston seals

Honda Molykote M-77 assembly paste P/N 08798-9010
- Inner shims (pad side)
- Outer shims (2 per wheel) (pad side)
- Back of brake pads
- Tabs of brake pads which run inside the caliper raceway
 

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My dealer does this every 'B' service. It should be done every 24K kms in my opinion.
 

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You ALWAYS lube the slides....Every time you do a brake job, use the caliper grease.. When you start wearing down one pad faster than the other, you will know what I mean.

Andy-Montreal has the correct info also. Dont want to go to the dealer? go to pepboys and pick up the $.99 packet

As far as doing it every oil change.......I dont but it wont hurt. You just dont want it dry. When it cant move with ease is when you start having problems.
 

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I agree with Peppy. Why on earth would you take the time and effort to do a half-assed brake service? It only takes a couple of minutes to remove pins and lubricate them when you are replacing the pads. That virtually guarantees they won't freeze until the next service provided you use the proper grease.
 
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