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Discussion Starter #1
Today I installed a Magnefine filter on the transmission return line. It is pretty easy and you dont have to pull anything. Put ridge up on ramps or at least jack up drivers side front, slide under with head towards back of car -on your back- if you look up just rearward of lower black plastic underbody panel you will see both transmission lines and where they attach to metal lines which end at banjo fittings. The outermost of these two lines should be the return line as far as I can determine based on Honda odessy transmission cooler install pdf and based on my temperature readings of both lines using a infra red temp gun. So all you have to do is disconnect rubber line from outward most metal line and run this rubber line onto Magnefine filter at large end (one with label), then add a 8-10 inch piece of 3/8 fuel or transmission line to other end of magnefine -create a loop with that line onto outward most metal line (where you removed first line) -now you are passing return flow in the correct direction through Magnefine back into transmission. Use appropriate clamps ,ie; screw clamps or other and In my case I just used tie wraps to hold Magnefine away from frame etc so as not to have rattles/vibration -lots of different ways you could tie wrap it- you will figure that out -I will include a pic but its hard to get a good pic as its up in there. Anyway Magnefine filters have a very good reputation and tests have shown a 50-75% reduction in metal particles.
 

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It is usually heat that takes out autos, not dirt. Nothing wrong with additional protection as long as you are not adding more potential points of failure.

Actually, a replaceable filter on the PS system might make as much sense considering how much gunk builds up there.
 
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I would use hose made specifically for the purpose rather than fuel hose. It will be thicker walled with the proper characteristics. I sourced some when I had to replace one of the lines that connect to the radiator. I would also make sure that the filter is properly secured. Some zip ties become quite brittle when exposed to prolonged engine heat. . . Basically there is nothing wrong with the idea of adding a filter unless you create a failure point.
 

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2006 Ridgeline RTS in Steel Blue
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My concern exactly, Zip ties don't like the Desert Heat, I doubt they will like engine heat any better
 

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I agree on the zip ties, in fact, screw clamps are not the best clamps either. These are:

I used to think many factory clamps looked cheap because they were not shiny with a high end screw assembly. But in fact the screw clamps have a better chance of loosening up over time compared with spring clamps.

If you use bolt clamps, use these kind. The will work against the pressure of fuel injection systems and don't chew up the rubber.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good points on both type of rubber line and zip ties, I did some research and transmission line does have quite a bit higher burst rating than reg fuel line, temp ratings for both were around 275f, std nylon tie wraps were rated for 185f continuous so they would probably last for quite a while as they only contact rubber hose but I am going to change them to high temp tie wraps which are 350f continuous and will swap hose to transmission rated type. I do like tie wrap method over solid mounting as it eliminates possible vibration/noise potential and is much simpler and plenty strong. Anyway thanks for tips.
 

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Little late replying but I think with good third party data.

Im looking to see whose put a magna fine on a gen II ridgeline -
yes heat is the number one killer
#2 is secondary wear on the clutches wearing them to slippage
#3 is the solenoids go- and why do the solenoids go?

According to John Eleftherakis and Abe Khalil, did a series of studies for the OE trans manufacturers and the aftermarket that started in the late '80s, and continue to today, the contamination makeup of the average transmission oil is 90 metallic. Of those metallic particles, 51 percent are ferrous (iron/steel), 21 percent copper, 11 percent aluminum and 7 percent lead. The particles range in size from 5 to 80 microns, about 82 percent of them larger than 5 microns. The pan filter is no better than a 60 micron... a very few get down to 40. The issue is that the solenoids in the trans are nothing more than electromagnets, so as your trans generates ferrous metallic contamination, those are going to be the places where it collects. That's why the pan magnets are there in the first place, to try and catch them before the solenoid does. It's a cheap OE way to get the trans out of warranty.

Uncle Dave
 
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