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I do not trust at all in HONDA dealers and have been doing the oil change at a Cobbleston Auto Spa. But, i just recently got the maintenance B 1 3 message which includes much more check points on the maintenance schedule. Should I get my car taken care at the dealer?
 

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Depends if you are confident in being able to do an oil/filter and transmission fluid change. It's not that difficult and there are plenty of videos around to guide you through it. If you're up to the job, then do it yourself so you know it's done properly.

In addition to this, there's also rotating the tires and a general inspection for potential wear and tear which is straight forward too.
 

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I agree with @SeattleR, it all depends on your confidence level on working on your own truck. If you can change your own oil/filter, doing the other fluids is just as easy. You don't even need to lift the vehicle.
 

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I agree with @SeattleR, it all depends on your confidence level on working on your own truck. If you can change your own oil/filter, doing the other fluids is just as easy. You don't even need to lift the vehicle.
Not lifting the vehicle is true from some, but not all people. Wiggling around on the floor under the car isn't exactly everyone's cup of tea, but neither silkiechicken or I have to lift the vehicle for B13... but a creeper and lifting it might be coming sooner or later, haha.

Doing the oil and transmission yourself is not technically challenging if you have a little experience wrenching on a car. We use a long funnel to get transmission fluid to where it needs to go. It by no means is something that should need to be done at a dealer, just make sure whoever does it uses Honda DW-1 fluid in the transmission.
 

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I do not trust at all in HONDA dealers and have been doing the oil change at a Cobbleston Auto Spa. But, i just recently got the maintenance B 1 3 message which includes much more check points on the maintenance schedule. Should I get my car taken care at the dealer?
I believe what I am hearing Jgsuarez asking is not whether he can do his own maintenance, but whether another shop can do the maintenance other than Honda? Personally we have recently been experiencing less than trustworthy service from private or "quick lube" shops on our other vehicles. A case in point is where our daughter recently had her oil changed at a "quick lube" shop before heading out of town on a trip. The shop failed to reinstall the drain plug correctly, she lost all of her oil and toasted an engine, and when she contacted the shop they told her tough luck, they would not take responsibility. Where our dealer so far has been providing piece of mind service for our Ridgeline, especially with it being still under warranty so if the dealer screws something up, it will be their responsibility to correct it. So, it mostly boils down to taking your Ridgeline to the shop that you have the greater faith in, which needn't be the dealer depending on an individual's experience and trust.

Bill
 

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In that case... It's hard to tell. If you don't have any experience in a dealership, and don't know anyone else that has gone there, all you can do is look at public reviews on the internet. This is purely anecdotal, but so far, we've had pretty good luck when the service writer has been straight forward, honest, clear, and not trying to upsell. You can learn this by just walking into the service area and eavesdropping. That said, I'm fully on-board with not trusting dealers. They are paid per job, and have incentive to cut as many corners as possible and do the job just good enough to not have the car come back.
 

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I do not trust at all in HONDA dealers and have been doing the oil change at a Cobbleston Auto Spa. But, i just recently got the maintenance B 1 3 message which includes much more check points on the maintenance schedule. Should I get my car taken care at the dealer?
During my ownership of several new vehicles through out the years, I personally have had the dealer perform all maintenance for the following reasons:
1. Warranty still active.
2. If they mess up, its on them.
3. Paperwork/record keeping.
4. The service dealer usually knows what is scheduled to be done during a specific maintenance issue.
 

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If you are lucky enough to find/have a local independent dealer with a good reputation for working on "japanese imports" (i.e. Honda, Toyota, Subaru, etc), then they might have a better price than the dealers (some of which are charging pretty steep prices for some regular maintenance items, like transmission and rear diff services), and you can be confident they will do a great job. I was lucky enough to live nearby an actual independent Honda repair shop for several years and used them regularly. I moved pretty far out in the country and now will handle most of my own regular maintenance items, if nothing other than peace of mind knowing the job was done correctly. I'll use dealer for any warranty work. As others mentioned, keep receipts and use oem parts/fluids. This makes sense regardless, as good maintenance records will keep a high resale value, especially to private parties who know that maintained Honda's can last a long time.

I would not trust any QwickyLube type place (although some could be just fine for oil changes - would NOT use them for transmission or rear diff services, etc).

Regarding transmission & rear diff services, these are made very easy when using something like Rhino Ramps.
Youtube has (mostly) alot of good videos on how to DIY these common service items, if you are so inclined.
 

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During my ownership of several new vehicles through out the years, I personally have had the dealer perform all maintenance for the following reasons:
1. Warranty still active.
2. If they mess up, its on them.
3. Paperwork/record keeping.
4. The service dealer usually knows what is scheduled to be done during a specific maintenance issue.
I have always had all of my maintenance done at a Honda Service Center and have always had a really good experience. Paying a few dollars more does not bother me, I have the peace of mind that they, at least from what I have experienced is worth it. I don't worry about saving a few dollars and that is all it is, it really does not equate to a large savings in my opinion. I used to change my oil and fluids like a lot of you out there but it is not worth my time any more and the mess it creates. If you are worried about saving a few dollars on a $45,000 or $50,000 dollar vehicle maybe you should have bought something less expensive.
Of course I realize there are some that enjoy doing their own maintenance and that is fine but to do it to save a few cents makes no sense to me.
I am sure I will receive a lot of criticism for my post but that is ok, each to his own. :)
 

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Folks, be aware that the "3" code (as in B13) also requires a transfer case fluid change (in addition to transmission fluid) - if you have AWD (that's almost all of us). It's right there in your owners manuals & guides - see first screen shot below for 2019 (Honda omits the word "case" for 2019, but I see it shows up for other years). Honda's Service Express shows this transfer case fluid change works like the rear differential, where there's a bottom drain plug, and a higher fill plug (no dipstick) - so after you drain it (and reinstall the drain plug with a new crush washer), you pump new fluid into it till it runs out the fill hole (so the vehicle must be somewhat level for that), then reinstall the fill plug also with new crush washer. While I can slide under for the rear differential, I can't for the transfer case (due to the rake) - I'm not pancake man :). It's (relatively) easy to change the transmission fluid (with the long funnel thru to the dipstick fill trick - for me it's easier than an oil change), but not for the transfer case. So I'm going to have my dealer do my B13 transfer case fluid change (only), up on their lift. Disclaimer; this info provided "as-is", I'm not responsible how you do this, your safety, etc.

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....Personally we have recently been experiencing less than trustworthy service from private or "quick lube" shops on our other vehicles. A case in point is where our daughter recently had her oil changed at a "quick lube" shop before heading out of town on a trip. The shop failed to reinstall the drain plug correctly, she lost all of her oil and toasted an engine, and when she contacted the shop they told her tough luck, they would not take responsibility. ...
I have to agree with you. I've been burned on these, never again! It seems new inexperienced hires are put on these jobs... Several times they massively overfilled my oil (2+ quarts) - that's bad for your engine, crankshaft can't splash up oil from underneath - so I had to drain off the excess myself. Then another rapid-lube shop stripped my daughter's Honda CR-Z oil pan fill plug, it did a slow leak for 6 months until we discovered it. Thankfully a sharp Honda mechanic was able to repair the oil pan threads with a Time-Sert $204 repair (details in the maintenance thread), which saved us $1,053 to replace the cast-aluminum oil "pan" (which requires jacking up the engine). So now for many years I do all my own oil, ATF, and rear differential fluid changes (I'll have the dealer do the transfer case). DIY is definitely not for everyone (requires modest skills, basic tools, a torque wrench [seemingly not heard of at some rapid oil change places...], follow basic safety procedures, etc.). If not DIY, then find a trusted shop - and stick with them.
 

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I used to change my oil and fluids like a lot of you out there but it is not worth my time any more and the mess it creates. If you are worried about saving a few dollars on a $45,000 or $50,000 dollar vehicle maybe you should have bought something less expensive. Of course I realize there are some that enjoy doing their own maintenance and that is fine but to do it to save a few cents makes no sense to me.
There are also other reasons that people do their own maintenance: For me the primary drivers are (i) to ensure it was performed correctly, with quality consumables/replacement parts and (ii) to save time over taking it into the dealership.

I fall into these categories. Better quality work, better quality consumables/replacement parts used and saves me hours of my time each service. I plan to keep my Ridgeline a long time, so I want it to be maintained well. The fact it is lower cost is just a bonus!
 

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If I may add to the above, I still like tinkering with our two simpler, 70's era, pickups, but with the more sophisticated newer cars, where things are more easily "broken", not so much!

Bill
 

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Since multiple maintenance events tend to be grouped around OCIs (oil change intervals), I rotate tires when an OCI is due. Using 4 jackstands, that gets the vehicle high enough off the ground to allow easy access underneath. Pulling the tires off makes it even easier to get to the oil filter, although in years past I was able to crank the steering wheel hard right and do an oil change without lifting the vehicle.

I tend to get 6000-7000 miles per OCI, so that's a natural point to do a tire rotation anyway. And lets me check the condition of the brake pads and guide pins.

So when it's time for a rear diff, tranny, or transfer assembly fluid change, it's pretty easy to tend to everything with the vehicle lifted. The only thing better than using jackstands would be one of those home lifts!
 

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.... Using 4 jackstands, that gets the vehicle high enough off the ground to allow easy access underneath.....
I'm sure you're careful, but I always have a second backup lift support if I'm working underneath the vehicle. If I use ramps, then I use jack stands as my backup (plus wheel chocks). If I were to use jack stands as my primary lift, then I'd use floor jacks or timber beams as backup. A number of us G2 owners (me too) for our first differential fluid change had to use breaker bars to initially loosen their drain plugs (I suppose from thread seizing - subsequent changes were easier. On mine, my undo motion needed was so strong it caused my G2 to rock as I was doing mine from the floor (no jacking was necessary). I would have been nervous if it was on jack stands only (if it were to rock off the stands).

In my summer college job in road construction, I saw a flipped vehicle pin its (originally uninjured) driver to the ground, and he died shortly afterwards. At the city intersection we were working, a small open door UPS-style delivery truck was T-boned at slow speed by a sedan. His truck spun 90 degrees, he fell out (wasn't wearing his seatbelt), and his truck fell over onto his head and torso. My whole crew and me ran over to lift the truck's side off him, and pulled him out (his screams and blood were horrible). He died in the ambulance ride to the hospital. That image has always stuck with me - so I always double up on ramps/chocks + stands whenever I work under my vehicle
 

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I'm sure you're careful, but I always have a second backup lift support if I'm working underneath the vehicle. If I use ramps, then I use jack stands as my backup (plus wheel chocks). If I were to use jack stands as my primary lift, then I'd use floor jacks or timber beams as backup. A number of us G2 owners (me too) for our first differential fluid change had to use breaker bars to initially loosen their drain plugs (I suppose from thread seizing - subsequent changes were easier. On mine, my undo motion needed was so strong it caused my G2 to rock as I was doing mine from the floor (no jacking was necessary). I would have been nervous if it was on jack stands only (if it were to rock off the stands).

In my summer college job in road construction, I saw a flipped vehicle pin its (originally uninjured) driver to the ground, and he died shortly afterwards. At the city intersection we were working, a small open door UPS-style delivery truck was T-boned at slow speed by a sedan. His truck spun 90 degrees, he fell out (wasn't wearing his seatbelt), and his truck fell over onto his head and torso. My whole crew and me ran over to lift the truck's side off him, and pulled him out (his screams and blood were horrible). He died in the ambulance ride to the hospital. That image has always stuck with me - so I always double up on ramps/chocks + stands whenever I work under my vehicle
Doubling up is not a bad idea. But I have 0 concerns about these jack stands failing when I'm underneath. I retired (and gave away) the jackstands to the left of the red one. Those are 6T and very robust. I didn't like how the silver and orange jackstands needed to be near the upper limit to have tire clearance. This shows the lift required to get the G1 Ridgeline tires off the ground (and the Pilot too).

The red ones are not even mid-point of the range. They also have a key lock in addition to the handle lock. I use 4 jackstands at a time under the side lift points after using my long frame floor jack on the central lift points to raise the vehicle. It would take an earthquake or tornado to move the vehicle on these stands.

Wood Ladder Automotive tire Tripod Gas
 
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