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If you just reset the oil change tracker, it doesn't skip monitoring the other service items does it? So when you get to the next 15% it should still be accurate with the code... Am I understanding this correctly?
Correct.

If you perpetually reset the oil life before it reaches 15%, the other maintenance codes will never display. However, once you let it reach 15%, other maintenance codes that are due or past due will be displayed. They're only cleared if the MM is reset while those other codes are displayed once the oil life reaches 15%.

The big problem occurs if you always change the oil before the MM indicates reaches 15% either because you never drive enough miles in a year or if you change the oil before prompted by the MM and reset the MM (i.e., dealer-recommend premature oil changes or old habits).
 

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Clearly, Honda failed to provide a solution for the situation where the vehicle is driven so little that an oil change is required before the oil life reaches 15% on an ongoing basis.

The Odyssey, RDX, and upcoming TLX are Honda's three models that will force the oil life to 15% after one year. Also, most other Honda models will let you view upcoming maintenance codes and reset individual items without the use of a scan cool.

Scenario 1: Owner A normally drives 12,000 miles per year. One year, a temporary situation results in driving only 2,000 miles for a year (i.e., pandemic, injury, job loss, etc.). The owner changes the oil after a year before the oil life reaches 15%. Let's say the next codes that would have appeared at 15% oil life are B16. The owner or mechanic resets the oil life to 100% as Honda instructs. After a year, the owner begins driving 12,000 miles per year again. The new time the oil life reaches 15%, code B16 will appear. The vehicle might be a couple thousand miles past due for a tire rotation and rear differential fluid change, but that's likely to be inconsequential.

Scenario 2: Owner B bought the Ridgeline as a weekend vehicle. They drive an EV to work. The Ridgeline only gets driven 3,000 miles per year. The oil gets changed and the MM is reset every year. This owner will NEVER see any maintenance minder codes including code 6 which would have become due at around 15,000 miles. So, after 5 years they'll be past due for the first rear differential fluid change. After 15 years, they'll be past due for the first transmission fluid change. There have been at least two examples of Ridgelines on this forum with six-digit odometer readings where these services were never performed and the vehicles were still functioning. The chances of an owner driving very little AND keeping the same vehicle for 5-15 years or more is extremely unlikely. Generally, the vehicle will have gained a new owner who will see 15% oil life in less than year.

The bottom line is to do what Honda says - follow the MM, but change your oil every year if you haven't reached 15% oil life then reset the MM. If you drive so little that you're changing the oil before 15% oil life on an ongoing basis, then you'll likely be dead or will have traded for a different vehicle by the time the missed maintenance will render the vehicle inoperable.
 

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I get what the computer is doing, but logically it makes no sense. When you reset for an Oil Change that should be completely independent of other milestones that need/should occur. People change their oil all the time before hitting the 15% mark, I know I would (pre Covid) because I would put up hundreds of miles a week and timing with oil changes I'd often have it changed in the 20s percent range or sooner. Or if you are going on a trip or whatever, not to mention what happens when people go in the opposite direction and let it go long past 0% does that throw off all the other maintenance minders ?

Up until now I thought they were all independent of each other, not based on oil change resets.
Imagine how complicated it would be if you had individual percentages or miles for the remaining life of the engine oil, transmission fluid, rear differential fluid, transfer case fluid, brake fluid, engine coolant, spark plugs, timing belt, and tire rotations! Your Maintenance Minder would be a screen full of numbers that would confuse and overwhelm most owners. Imagine being prompted for an oil change and having that done then two weeks later being prompted for a differential fluid change then a month later being prompted for a transmission fluid change then a week later being prompted for a tire rotation.

One of the primary goals for the Maintenance Minder is to make life simpler - not more difficult.

How easy and handy it would have been to simply publish the underlying mileage schedule the computer is actually using...
Because engine oil and transmission fluid life aren't based on distance traveled. Based on observations of when the indicated oil life reaches 15% and oil analyses, we can estimate the average life of engine oil. Based on observations of when codes 3 and 6 appear, we can estimate the average life of the transmission fluid and rear differential fluid. However, what's valid for one vehicle isn't necessarily valid for the next. That's the beauty of the MM - it takes the GUESSWORK out of the equation.

Owners can't seem to properly respond to a single prompt that tells them exactly what maintenance is due. How are they supposed to understand an algorithm that calculates maintenance needs based on inputs from various sensors?

For the life of me, I simply cannot understand why people are so hellbent against following such simple instructions as the Maintenance Minder as if it's some sort of politically-motivated mind control conspiracy created by the government. Good heavens.
 

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For the life of me, I simply cannot understand why some people are so hellbent against folks who choose to use their own maintenance schedule?
How many people on this forum do you believe know more about their vehicles than the people who made the vehicle?

My personal reasoning is that with the maintenance minder you really cannot plan on which maintenance is going to be needed until the maintenance minder tells you. Also, the maintenance Minder is inflexible, I plan on changing the engine oil every 5,000 miles as provided by the dealer, and due to the issues with the 6-speed transmission, changing the transmission fluid sooner than the MM specifies. You cannot do this without pissing the MM off!
The Maintenance Minder prompts for maintenance that is due soon once the calculated oil life reaches 15%. If the oil life decreased to 15% over 8,500 miles and you drive about 12,000 miles per year, then you've got about a month-and-a-half's advance notice about what maintenance is coming due. If that's not a large enough window to schedule service, order the fluids for DIY service, or start a GoFundMe, then perhaps public transportation might be a better choice than private automobile ownership. :)

I don't blame you for wanting to change the transmission fluid before being prompted by the MM in an attempt to avoid or delay failure, but at the mileages some of the transmissions are failing, it appears that premature fluid changes are futile. You might get some TCC judder, but Honda states that's not a fatal condition. Per TSB's 17-025 and 17-026: "American Honda investigated the judder and found that the torque converter was not causing the judder and the transmission is not damaged by this judder." If you get the judder, then flush the transmission fluid and carry on.

The MM is not preventing you from changing the fluids as often as you want. Want to change it every 5,000 miles with your engine oil? Do it. The MM won't know and won't care about the unnecessary waste.
 

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Zroger73, our last vehicle that we purchased new is now 20 years old, has over 400,000 miles on it, and I am still using it as my daily driver.

Zroger73, you obviously have made it your mission to share with us on this forum of how unhappy you have been with your Ridgeline and dumped yours because of it, (your tag line, So long for now, Honda, shows us this.)
So do Ridgelines that are maintained according to the Maintenance Minder. Right @chisoxjim and @sstrahley? Guess which ones have lower ownership costs while providing the same useful life - the ones maintained using some "fancy" oil more frequently than the vehicle calls for or "bulk" oil only when prompted by the Maintenance Minder?

My "mission" is to correct misinformation. I no longer own a Ridgeline or any Honda product nor do I have any current plans to, yet I'm still happy to help. It makes no difference to me how a person maintains their vehicles, but I'm free to share facts when they share opinions.
 

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Btw, does anyone have an idea what is the chronological order of the MM code? Did Honda publish anything regarding that, or there's only empirical data?
There has never been a distance-based maintenance schedule for any Ridgeline. Honda says nothing other than "follow the Maintenance Minder", so we can only go by owner reports.

Honda says the engine oil and transmission fluid life are calculated based on actual driving conditions. The other maintenance items are aligned with the nearest oil change.

Based on observations the "average" driver will see the following (+/- a few thousand miles):

A1 (engine oil, tire rotation) at about 8,500 miles.
B16 (engine oil, oil filter, tire rotation, rear differential fluid) at about 17,000 miles.
A12 (engine oil, tire rotation, engine/cabin air filters) at about 25,500 miles.
B1 (engine oil, oil filter, tire rotation) at about 34,000 miles.
A136 (engine oil, tire rotation, transmission/transfer fluid, differential fluid) at about 42,500 miles.
B12 (engine oil, oil filter, tire rotation, engine/cabin air filters) at about 51,000 miles.

(This information is based on my observations of owning five Ridgelines, the reports of @silkiechicken, and other members of this forum.)

Keep in mind that not every owner will see this exact sequence since it varies based on actual driving conditions and when the maintenance is performed.

Honda says to change the rear differential fluid at 7,500 then every 15,000 and the timing belt every 60,000 under specific, "severe" conditions. They also say to change the engine and cabin air filters every 15,000 under specific "dirty" conditions. Otherwise, "follow the Maintenance Minder".

Individual Maintenance Minder codes can be reset by a Honda dealer using their scan tool. For example, if the transmission fluid is replaced before prompted by the Maintenance Minder due to a repair, the transmission fluid life can be reset while leaving the other maintenance items including the engine oil life unchanged to keep the Maintenance Minder in sync with actual maintenance needs.
 

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Thanks a lot @zroger73!

I got a technical paper which provides some insight into the oil life monitoring system. It's from 2003, so not sure whether it's still used:
Yes - that technical paper explains the basis for Honda's oil life monitoring system.

Of note:

The Maintenance Minder assumes the use of "oils that deteriorate faster" (i.e. "bulk oil" used by dealerships) and the fact that some of the old oil remains int the engine and includes an offset for potential error.
 

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So I just scheduled my RL for A136 service. I'm around 46,000 miles. Since I had the transmission fluid changed in October as part of the diagnostics before the torque converter replacement (also in Oct), and I just took my snows off last month, I told the service rep I only needed the oil, transfer and differential fluids replaced. He said their computer indicates that the first transfer fluid replacement comes at 60,000.

Has anyone else heard this? I'm thinking I'll tell them to do it anyways.
If the dealer changed the fluid seven months ago, they should have reset the transmission fluid life in the Maintenance Minder and you should not be seeing code 3. If you do, that means the dealer didn't follow the instructions.

Transfer is done with transmission when code 3 appears which is normally around 45K for the average driver then every 30K for the 6-speed.

The information your service rep is seeing on his computer didn't come from Honda or he's misinterpreting it. You could always show him the owner's manual where it states that the transfer fluid is to be change with the transmission fluid is changed when code 3 appears on the MM. :)
 
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