Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner
101 - 120 of 155 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
So I plan to buy either a new Ridgeline RTL-E or a Ram 1500 - the Ram has an option for a 33 gallon fuel tank. However, I have been a Honda guy for a long time (currently own an Acura MDX, CRV, honda snowblower, lawnmower, etc). Ram gets great reviews but I worry about reliability/build quality issues.
I make a 665 mile (one way) road trip 7-10 times a year, I don't like to stop. Assuming no trailer or other add-ons that would lower highway MPG (such at big AT tires) - what are people seeing for Max highway range in miles after topping up the fuel tank until it almost spills out of the ground? My 665 trip is one long flat ribbon of a road where most cars are traveling 75-80mph. I read a 19.5gallon tank - so maybe 500 miles of range assuming no serious headwind? Hondas are great vehicles - but they often have small gas tanks.

Also, I know subjective, but is the ridgeline interior quiet at 75 mph?
I drive out to Colorado from Pennsylvania a few times per year in my 2017 RTL-E. Safe range planning is 425 miles.
 

·
Premium Member
2020 Honda Ridgeline RTL-E Pacific Pewter Metallic
Joined
·
48 Posts
I use Fuelly to keep track of my mileage and the best recorded is 25.3mpg which was recorded on a drive to Florida. It was mixed 60mph to 75mph. On I-95 at a steady 75mph my best was 24.6mpg. I drive a 2020 RTL-E and there were 3 adults with luggage, no trailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
So I plan to buy either a new Ridgeline RTL-E or a Ram 1500 - the Ram has an option for a 33 gallon fuel tank. However, I have been a Honda guy for a long time (currently own an Acura MDX, CRV, honda snowblower, lawnmower, etc). Ram gets great reviews but I worry about reliability/build quality issues.
I make a 665 mile (one way) road trip 7-10 times a year, I don't like to stop. Assuming no trailer or other add-ons that would lower highway MPG (such at big AT tires) - what are people seeing for Max highway range in miles after topping up the fuel tank until it almost spills out of the ground? My 665 trip is one long flat ribbon of a road where most cars are traveling 75-80mph. I read a 19.5gallon tank - so maybe 500 miles of range assuming no serious headwind? Hondas are great vehicles - but they often have small gas tanks.

Also, I know subjective, but is the ridgeline interior quiet at 75 mph?
I have a 2020 RTL. On the highway, Driving above 2000 RPM about 75 mph will get around 20 mph on flat roadways. In town driving 14 mph. Very disappointed. This is my second Ridgeline and was sold on the Ridgeline until I purchased the 2020. Thinking about a Dodge diesel which will be used to pull a 5th wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
what are people seeing for Max highway range in miles after topping up the fuel tank until it almost spills out of the ground?
For you with additional info for others as well:

If I drive normal like some other people do (which is abnormal for me), as in "no hurry", I can get 25+mpg on the highways, but only about 20-21 in constant, short drives around the city. I am retired, so no daily drives to work or elsewhere. Just sporadic drives to stores, appointments, friends/family etc.

Last month, we went up to Pinetop AZ from Mesa (Phoenix) AZ, 160 miles/3 hours one way, and going from 1500ft to 6800ft - AND BACK, with probably at least an additional 5-7000ft of elevation changes if not more. When we got back home, my average fuel was 26.6 mpg, BUT I was babying it and coasting to see what's the best it could do in up-and-down elevation driving. I would probably would have gotten only 22-23 maybe if I just drove like normal people.

HOWEVER, that is also with my wife at 150lbs, me at 230lbs, 100lbs of tools/emergency stuff in the bed trunk and at least 400lbs in the bed for a total payload of 880lbs. I don't count the weigh of the toneau since it is allegedly offset by no bed tail wind drag .

I also got 26mpg during a camping trip up to the mountains with my son 5 months ago with probably at least 100-200lbs more payload, but babying it that time too. Keep in mind though, coasting downhills rarely offsets the extra gas going up since you end up hitting your brakes to slow a lot. That makes me think a straight level road would do even better. I would guess 25mpg at 75mph on the highway driving normal.

TOPPING OFF: I almost always top it off when filling and more to the max when driving distances or having fuel points to use. I have filled my tank to exactly 21.0 gallons with a high probability of at least 0.5 gallons still in the tank which is not good for the pump, and also to 23.861 gallons when I stupidly was not paying attention. I still had no idea how I got to almost 24 gallons and so filed a complaint with the dept of weights and measures. However, I recently learned that when you go beyond filling the neck (3/4-1ga), some of it can return into the pumps vapor recovery system giving them some free gas at our expense and, much worse, it can possibly spill over into the EVAP system via the vapor intake hole, which can then be sucked into the charcoal canister which can only deal with fumes and can ruin it to the tune of a few hundred dollars or much more, especially trying to diagnose it. I have no clue myself. I now assume that because I was filling it so very, very slowly in order to totally max it (had $0.80 off per gallon points) that it was going back into the vapor recovery system, or perhaps somewhere else(?), and wasting much of my discount and time.

NOISE: Both my wife and I believe the cabin noise at highway speeds is better than average. But that is a very general comparison to other cars we ride in and our previous vehicles which were, we believe, average. We are both close to 60, so that is a lot of experience, but not something particularly accurate as most of our vehicles have been average to slightly above average in price.

TOWING: Twice I got 13mpg towing 2400lbs with about 500lbs on the truck to the California Dunes and back from Mesa AZ. Couldn't drive over 55-65mph the first time because the transmission kept overheating and the average temp was about 68. In fact, it overheated when I drove up to Flagstaff in November with only about a 900lb payload, going up and down hills trying to keep it up to 65-70. After getting the 30k transmission service at just over 30k miles, the second time we went to the dunes with the same load, no problem. I have no idea what the deal was and the dealer alleged not to know either.

Of course they pretended not to know why my hood fluttered dramatically too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
For you with additional info for others as well:

If I drive normal like some other people do (which is abnormal for me), as in "no hurry", I can get 25+mpg on the highways, but only about 20-21 in constant, short drives around the city. I am retired, so no daily drives to work or elsewhere. Just sporadic drives to stores, appointments, friends/family etc.

Last month, we went up to Pinetop AZ from Mesa (Phoenix) AZ, 160 miles/3 hours one way, and going from 1500ft to 6800ft - AND BACK, with probably at least an additional 5-7000ft of elevation changes if not more. When we got back home, my average fuel was 26.6 mpg, BUT I was babying it and coasting to see what's the best it could do in up-and-down elevation driving. I would probably would have gotten only 22-23 maybe if I just drove like normal people.

HOWEVER, that is also with my wife at 150lbs, me at 230lbs, 100lbs of tools/emergency stuff in the bed trunk and at least 400lbs in the bed for a total payload of 880lbs. I don't count the weigh of the toneau since it is allegedly offset by no bed tail wind drag .

I also got 26mpg during a camping trip up to the mountains with my son 5 months ago with probably at least 100-200lbs more payload, but babying it that time too. Keep in mind though, coasting downhills rarely offsets the extra gas going up since you end up hitting your brakes to slow a lot. That makes me think a straight level road would do even better. I would guess 25mpg at 75mph on the highway driving normal.

TOPPING OFF: I almost always top it off when filling and more to the max when driving distances or having fuel points to use. I have filled my tank to exactly 21.0 gallons with a high probability of at least 0.5 gallons still in the tank which is not good for the pump, and also to 23.861 gallons when I stupidly was not paying attention. I still had no idea how I got to almost 24 gallons and so filed a complaint with the dept of weights and measures. However, I recently learned that when you go beyond filling the neck (3/4-1ga), some of it can return into the pumps vapor recovery system giving them some free gas at our expense and, much worse, it can possibly spill over into the EVAP system via the vapor intake hole, which can then be sucked into the charcoal canister which can only deal with fumes and can ruin it to the tune of a few hundred dollars or much more, especially trying to diagnose it. I have no clue myself. I now assume that because I was filling it so very, very slowly in order to totally max it (had $0.80 off per gallon points) that it was going back into the vapor recovery system, or perhaps somewhere else(?), and wasting much of my discount and time.

NOISE: Both my wife and I believe the cabin noise at highway speeds is better than average. But that is a very general comparison to other cars we ride in and our previous vehicles which were, we believe, average. We are both close to 60, so that is a lot of experience, but not something particularly accurate as most of our vehicles have been average to slightly above average in price.

TOWING: Twice I got 13mpg towing 2400lbs with about 500lbs on the truck to the California Dunes and back from Mesa AZ. Couldn't drive over 55-65mph the first time because the transmission kept overheating and the average temp was about 68. In fact, it overheated when I drove up to Flagstaff in November with only about a 900lb payload, going up and down hills trying to keep it up to 65-70. After getting the 30k transmission service at just over 30k miles, the second time we went to the dunes with the same load, no problem. I have no idea what the deal was and the dealer alleged not to know either.

Of course they pretended not to know why my hood fluttered dramatically too.
go to youtube and look for the mythbusters episode that talks about tailgate up vs tailgate down. Tailgate down creates more surface area and drag - less fuel efficient. Tailgate up, no cover, there is an "air bubble" over the rear bed that improves gas mileage....
 

·
Registered
2021 Ridgeline Sport; metallic red, 9/21 manufactur date
Joined
·
22 Posts
My 21 RTL-E has 18,000 miles almost all highway driving. I get 21.5 mpg best, driving 72 to 77 MPH with the Econ mostly on and I am not a jack rabbit type driver. This MPH is calculated, not computer. 21.5 x 19.5 gal = 419 miles. I am disappointed in the mileage. On other vehicles, same type of driving, I have gotten about the EPA numbers, 24 in the case of the Ridgeline.
Maybe try with the ECO mode off; that helped my MPG by abt 2mph. And yes, approaching 70MPH, mpg seems to ratchet down by about 3mpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
go to youtube and look for the mythbusters episode that talks about tailgate up vs tailgate down. Tailgate down creates more surface area and drag - less fuel efficient. Tailgate up, no cover, there is an "air bubble" over the rear bed that improves gas mileage....
There have been various tests over the years, with various results. In 2013 Consumer Reports tested one truck with three different arrangements and found tailgate up was best, tailgate down second best, and soft cover third best. I don't know why they didn't test it with a hard cover, but others have and found that that was best. But I recall reading about one test, which I can't find right now, which used several different trucks and tested each in several set-ups and they found that it varied by truck. Some trucks might be better with tailgate up, some down, etc. Ultimately, the difference probably wasn't significant enough to worry about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
Thanks, Longboat - very helpful data. I agree headwind is a huge factor. Made this trip last week and on the way south it was a headwind - way home we had a tailwind and it made a significant difference in range. Ram is nice - but may be overkill in many ways (size) for my needs the majority of the time.
Don't forget to consider side-winds. I estimate a 10% drop in mileage when I've driven in heavy winds mostly coming from the side, of course some of those winds were strong enough to make it a constant battle to drive straight.
 

·
Registered
2019 RTL
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
The RTL adds an acoustic windshield and foam in the doors. The RTL-E adds insulation below the carpet.
The 2019 RTL doesn't have any sound reducing foam in the doors (I know as I added Dynamat). It does have a sheet of "waterproofing" foam but that will do nothing for sound-proofing. Do you know which MY introduced the acoustic foam and what form it actually takes (is it adhered to the outer skins)??

And for the insulation under the carpet, Does anyone have any photos of what that looks like? I can't imagine it is adhered to the floor, so is it just an extra layer of "carpet". i.e. when an RTL-E owner lifts their rear carpet (as I know you've all done :)) do they see the thick upper carpet and then another thin layer below it? If anyone has a photo, I'll be interested in seeing what Honda have actually done as I can't imagine a thin floating layer under that (very) thick foam carpet is going to do much, if anything, to reduce road noise.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
22,414 Posts
Honda said in a press release for the 2017 Ridgeline:

All Ridgeline trims feature multiple strategically placed body sealants, while the RTL and above trims add internal foam front and rear door acoustic barriers, and the RTL-E and Black Edition add a high-density barrier layer beneath the floor carpeting for additional sound attenuation.

The barriers are outlined in red in the photo of a 2019 Ridgeline RTL-T by @SmilinSteve below.

Automotive tire Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive design Bumper
 

·
Registered
2017 RTL-T (2016-2021), 2022 RTL-E (2021-present)
Joined
·
129 Posts
Having logged every gallon of gasoline I've dispensed into each of the dozens of automobiles and motorcycles I've ever owned over the years, I've never found any statistically significant variation in fuel economy between seasons or after some "break-in" period. All my life, I've heard that fuel economy is lower in Winter and lowest when a vehicle is new before improving after the engine breaks in. I can show you graph after graph that does not support those claims. However, we rarely have "cold" (below freezing?) weather here in NE Texas.
I'm guessing that your last sentence is the reason. Up here in northern NH the seasonal impact on MPG is pretty noticeable. I also track every tank of gas into every vehicle. Here are 2 examples across 70k miles on a 2013 Crosstrek, and 75k miles on a Ridgeline. X-axis is month of year.

Blue Azure Violet Font Rectangle


Blue Azure Purple Violet Font
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Having logged every gallon of gasoline I've dispensed into each of the dozens of automobiles and motorcycles I've ever owned over the years, I've never found any statistically significant variation in fuel economy between seasons or after some "break-in" period. All my life, I've heard that fuel economy is lower in Winter and lowest when a vehicle is new before improving after the engine breaks in. I can show you graph after graph that does not support those claims. However, we rarely have "cold" (below freezing?) weather here in NE Texas.
For northern states, decrease is a very real and documented thing. According to fueleconomy.gov:

Cold weather and winter driving conditions can reduce your fuel economy significantly.
Fuel economy tests show that, in city driving, a conventional gasoline car's gas mileage is roughly 15% lower at 20°F than it would be at 77°F. It can drop as much as 24% for short (3- to 4-mile) trips.
The effect on hybrids is typically greater. Their fuel economy can drop about 30% to 34% under these conditions.
For electric vehicles (EVs), fuel economy can drop roughly 39% in mixed city and highway driving, and range can drop by 41%. About two-thirds of the extra energy consumed is used to heat the cabin.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
22,414 Posts
For electric vehicles (EVs), fuel economy can drop roughly 39% in mixed city and highway driving, and range can drop by 41%. About two-thirds of the extra energy consumed is used to heat the cabin.
Some EV's such as certain trims of the Nissan Leaf and some Tesla models use a heat pump instead of electrical resistance heaters which dramatically drops the amount of energy used to heat the cabin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Some EV's such as certain trims of the Nissan Leaf and some Tesla models use a heat pump instead of electrical resistance heaters which dramatically drops the amount of energy used to heat the cabin.
Yep, heat pumps usually have a COP of 3 (about 3x more efficient than resistive heaters). I was just thinking that in the southeast, summer may actually be worse than winter due to all the air conditioning. Most populated areas of California, get the best weather mix and thus the best MPG. That's good because gas is over $5 a gallon now there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
My bladder is more of a limiting factor than my gas tank!
This is my primary factor as well!

I usually take 1 or 2 road trips per year, usually over 1000 miles one-way. I've only done one such trip in my 2020 RL RTL-E, and I think I averaged around ~25MPG. That would rate 475 miles or so on a full tank. I would usually stop and fill up once fuel is below 1/4 tank and range is <100 miles.

I usually can't drive ~300 miles (probably 4 hours or more) without wanting or having to stop to pee and walk around.
 

·
Registered
2022 Ridgeline RTL, 2019 Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
241 Posts
So I plan to buy either a new Ridgeline RTL-E or a Ram 1500 - the Ram has an option for a 33 gallon fuel tank. However, I have been a Honda guy for a long time (currently own an Acura MDX, CRV, honda snowblower, lawnmower, etc). Ram gets great reviews but I worry about reliability/build quality issues.
I make a 665 mile (one way) road trip 7-10 times a year, I don't like to stop. Assuming no trailer or other add-ons that would lower highway MPG (such at big AT tires) - what are people seeing for Max highway range in miles after topping up the fuel tank until it almost spills out of the ground? My 665 trip is one long flat ribbon of a road where most cars are traveling 75-80mph. I read a 19.5gallon tank - so maybe 500 miles of range assuming no serious headwind? Hondas are great vehicles - but they often have small gas tanks.

Also, I know subjective, but is the ridgeline interior quiet at 75 mph?
I don't see anyway the Ram is going that far on one tank. You would have to get over 20 MPG times the 33 gallon tank and I am sure you will not want to run out of gas. I never could get better than 18 MPG on my 2015 RAM and that was driving 55-70 miles per hour. My Ridgeline gets around 23 MPG driving same pattern. We have RFG gas so that probably hurts mileage.
 
101 - 120 of 155 Posts
Top