Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

Should I?

  • Buy a Grom

  • Buy a used bike to work on

  • Buy a dirt bike

  • Something else

41 - 60 of 74 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
That's exactly what I'm looking at, I can probably get a smaller bike for cheaper but I want this to be MY bike and with how much work I plan to do this bike will mean a lot, I think bigger is better in this case.

Thank you so much for your input it's very valuable
You are most welcome. If you need any guidance along the way, give me a shout. I did a frame off build on a DR650 a few years back. Fixed the weak issues on the bike and built back how I wanted. That bike has done the Transamerica Trail, twice and the continental divide. Excellent commuter in rural or heavy traffic areas.
 

·
Registered
2021 Ridgeline Sport
Joined
·
892 Posts
My whole family use to ride bikes, and their are some great tips on here. My sister took her test on a borrowed 250 Rebel, then bought a 650 Shadow, now has a Spyder. My bro-in-law had a 1100 shadow, then a Valkyrie for almost 10 years, finally bought a BMW 1200RT. My dad had a couple of Gold Wing trikes, and also bought a Spyder Touring with a trailer. I've had so many I can't even list them all, 400cc two stroke dirt bikes, various cruisers, but dual sports are the most fun to ride. Just beware of getting anything too old, as parts could be a problem, keep us posted on your quest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I have always wanted a motorcycle but I don't want it as a daily driver, more of a fun day cruiser.

My price range is anything less than 3k and the main thing I want is a bike that's fun to work on with lots of aftermarket and affordable oem parts

The front runner is the Grom for all the reasons above, my only concern is the size will be just a little too small for my liking, I'm a moderately tall guy @6'2" and I feel like the grom might feel like riding a mini bike and that would definitely remove some enjoyment for me.

Maybe I just need to go test ride one and find out

My second choice is a used motorcycle that will be definitely bigger and probably faster and I don't mind putting some work into a bike to get it running but my motorcycle engine experience is pretty sad, if I choose this route I would like something that will be easy to work on even if the bike is older.

I really want a bike that will help me learn how to work on motorcycles and is still fun to ride.

I don't even necessarily need something reliable, just something that I will have to work on but has cheap and easily available parts.

For reference I'm a novice rider, I have some experience on the road but in a 150cc scooter

My question is just this

What motorcycles have you ridden, and what motorcycle was the most fun to work on.
Look for something under 1000 cv. A 750 Suzuki Honda or Kawasaki would be good for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
You are a tall dude....no way on the Grom.

Craigslist is LOADED with very low mileage, very high reliability Japanese bikes.... every shape and size.
Japanese cruisers, used, are usually insanely cheap... they are reliable, but lack the Harley factor.

If you can tinker, and you are sticking to that $3,000 budget, you can even get a Harley.... if they are not perfect, they can go very cheap, too....and are notoriously easy to repair.....easy access to all parts of the bike compared to others.
If you like accessories, lots of popular models are good for that, but I'd be surprised if ANY bikes beats Harley for accessory/upgrade options.

Motorcycles have fallen off, quite a bit, in popularity....and people are dumping them just to make space in the garage. (I know I did!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I agree with the V-Strom 650. It is bigger than you wanted but not heavy. Very civilized, but able to go off-road as well. I would also consider a Kawasaki KLR 650. That bike is dirt cheap and bullet proof. There are millions of them out there and parts are readily available. Both of these bikes get about 45 mpg. I would consider the V-Strom to be 70% street 30% dirt bike and the KLR to be 30%street and 70% dirt. bike. I love dual purpose bikes. You never know when you'll come to the end of the pavement and want to see where the unpaved road goes.
 

·
Registered
2006 Ridgeline RT
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter · #46 ·
I agree with the V-Strom 650. It is bigger than you wanted but not heavy. Very civilized, but able to go off-road as well. I would also consider a Kawasaki KLR 650. That bike is dirt cheap and bullet proof. There are millions of them out there and parts are readily available. Both of these bikes get about 45 mpg. I would consider the V-Strom to be 70% street 30% dirt bike and the KLR to be 30%street and 70% dirt. bike. I love dual purpose bikes. You never know when you'll come to the end of the pavement and want to see where the unpaved road goes.
Thanks for the recommendations, I have been looking for a DR600 and a KLR 650 but havent found anything great yet. A V-strom might be interesting i hadn't considered that one.


You are a tall dude....no way on the Grom.

Craigslist is LOADED with very low mileage, very high reliability Japanese bikes.... every shape and size.
Japanese cruisers, used, are usually insanely cheap... they are reliable, but lack the Harley factor.

If you can tinker, and you are sticking to that $3,000 budget, you can even get a Harley.... if they are not perfect, they can go very cheap, too....and are notoriously easy to repair.....easy access to all parts of the bike compared to others.
If you like accessories, lots of popular models are good for that, but I'd be surprised if ANY bikes beats Harley for accessory/upgrade options.

Motorcycles have fallen off, quite a bit, in popularity....and people are dumping them just to make space in the garage. (I know I did!)

Harleys are very popular in my area and most used ones in my price range are already repairs i probably couldnt do but i will keep an open mind, i think i really want something that can go offroad and probably jump so big engine and light weight are a must.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I've ridden for over 60 years. Had too many bikes to count. All the recommendations for the Doctor Zed or KLR are spot on. They are both pretty much bullet proof, have a huge library of aftermarket parts, easy to ride, easy to work on. Depending on where you live in AZ (sorry if I missed that earlier) there are plenty of places you can ride both on and off road with them. That one that you posted a photo of looks like too much work as you should find a balance between going out and having fun and spending a day or two wrenching on the bike, not spending all your time tracking down parts, waiting for the delivery driver, working on the bike and then finding that you still need more parts. I think some of the most fun I've had were on dual sport type bikes (current bike is a Triumph Tiger 800XC with upgraded Andriani Misano fork cartridges and Olins rear shock), or maybe some of the one litre super bikes I've had. Then again, 2 smokes always gave me a hard on from the power hit at mid band, but are not street worthy. When my sons and girlfriend learned how to ride, they were all on dirt bikes (Honda CRF's). The CRF250L is another bullet proof bike, easy to work on, water cooled for AZ riding, has quite a few aftermarket parts, light weight, street legal, fuel injected, perfect for your height and weight and not too big CC wise so you would feel more comfortable riding it.
415691
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I've ridden for over 60 years. Had too many bikes to count. All the recommendations for the Doctor Zed or KLR are spot on. They are both pretty much bullet proof, have a huge library of aftermarket parts, easy to ride, easy to work on. Depending on where you live in AZ (sorry if I missed that earlier) there are plenty of places you can ride both on and off road with them. That one that you posted a photo of looks like too much work as you should find a balance between going out and having fun and spending a day or two wrenching on the bike, not spending all your time tracking down parts, waiting for the delivery driver, working on the bike and then finding that you still need more parts. I think some of the most fun I've had were on dual sport type bikes (current bike is a Triumph Tiger 800XC with upgraded Andriani Misano fork cartridges and Olins rear shock), or maybe some of the one litre super bikes I've had. Then again, 2 smokes always gave me a hard on from the power hit at mid band, but are not street worthy. When my sons and girlfriend learned how to ride, they were all on dirt bikes (Honda CRF's). The CRF250L is another bullet proof bike, easy to work on, water cooled for AZ riding, has quite a few aftermarket parts, light weight, street legal, fuel injected, perfect for your height and weight and not too big CC wise so you would feel more comfortable riding it.
View attachment 415691
That "garage" is a work of art!!!
 

·
Registered
2006 Ridgeline RT
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter · #50 ·
I've ridden for over 60 years. Had too many bikes to count. All the recommendations for the Doctor Zed or KLR are spot on. They are both pretty much bullet proof, have a huge library of aftermarket parts, easy to ride, easy to work on. Depending on where you live in AZ (sorry if I missed that earlier) there are plenty of places you can ride both on and off road with them. That one that you posted a photo of looks like too much work as you should find a balance between going out and having fun and spending a day or two wrenching on the bike, not spending all your time tracking down parts, waiting for the delivery driver, working on the bike and then finding that you still need more parts. I think some of the most fun I've had were on dual sport type bikes (current bike is a Triumph Tiger 800XC with upgraded Andriani Misano fork cartridges and Olins rear shock), or maybe some of the one litre super bikes I've had. Then again, 2 smokes always gave me a hard on from the power hit at mid band, but are not street worthy. When my sons and girlfriend learned how to ride, they were all on dirt bikes (Honda CRF's). The CRF250L is another bullet proof bike, easy to work on, water cooled for AZ riding, has quite a few aftermarket parts, light weight, street legal, fuel injected, perfect for your height and weight and not too big CC wise so you would feel more comfortable riding it.
View attachment 415691
Thank you so much, this is so much information and it's all great, I have been itching to ride more and more, and I can find 250s near me in Avondale and quite a few of them, but all the bigger dual sport bikes are kind of like the one I posted above, I still have a couple months before I can actually buy anything decent but I'm always watching the market just to see what's available and how much the ask.

I can admit I like power but a 250 would probably be plenty for a while. I'll keep my options open.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Buy an old dualsport bike. They always need some love. Spokes, bearings, suspension and drive components are often neglected. Just get one that was popular and there will still be tons of parts available from eBay or Rmatvmc. Or do what I did and make a 25yr old Honda XR400 street legal. It’s fun, bulletproof and good for 55-60mph sustained speeds and can run an occasional 70 for passing. Just don’t run a small bore dualsport on the freeway, they’re too slow for that.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Thank you so much, this is so much information and it's all great, I have been itching to ride more and more, and I can find 250s near me in Avondale and quite a few of them, but all the bigger dual sport bikes are kind of like the one I posted above, I still have a couple months before I can actually buy anything decent but I'm always watching the market just to see what's available and how much the ask.

I can admit I like power but a 250 would probably be plenty for a while. I'll keep my options open.
My dad has a 2007 or so Kawasaki KLR 650 that he can't ride any more. It is sitting in my brother's garage in Glendale, AZ. Runs fine, has fairing, engine bars, highway pegs, etc... I bet he'd sell it for $2000-2500. Color is red, plastic is faded a little. I know he has street tires as well as knobbys for it. Let me know if you're interested and I'll talk to him about it.
 

·
Registered
2006 Ridgeline RT
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter · #55 ·
My dad has a 2007 or so Kawasaki KLR 650 that he can't ride any more. It is sitting in my brother's garage in Glendale, AZ. Runs fine, has fairing, engine bars, highway pegs, etc... I bet he'd sell it for $2000-2500. Color is red, plastic is faded a little. I know he has street tires as well as knobbys for it. Let me know if you're interested and I'll talk to him about it.
I'm interested, but it will be a while before i can actually buy it. I'll send you a PM and if he isnt pressed to get rid of it ASAP I think it will work out good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
I would suggest a dual sport 250 (290-325 lbs) , or Suzuki DR650 at about 370 lbs. I started out on a XL250 back in 1972 and now almost 1/2 a century later still enjoy riding a dual sport 250. My current one is a XT250 which appeals to me for a number of reasons. It has plenty of ground clearance yet the seat isn't much over 31" and it makes decent low end power so it's easy to ride. It's also air cooled and still manufactured in Japan. 2013+ are FI which is an advantage. It's happy running 60 mph down the highway or plodding along on a tight trail at 5mph. I actually enjoy this bike more than the WR250R I had.
I've also owned a couple each DR650 and KLR650's but they're geared taller and are noticeably heavier for trying to trail ride with. But they're capable of running higher speeds on the highway.

 

·
Registered
2006 Ridgeline RT
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter · #57 ·
I would suggest a dual sport 250 (290-325 lbs) , or Suzuki DR650 at about 370 lbs. I started out on a XL250 back in 1972 and now almost 1/2 a century later still enjoy riding a dual sport 250. My current one is a XT250 which appeals to me for a number of reasons. It has plenty of ground clearance yet the seat isn't much over 31" and it makes decent low end power so it's easy to ride. It's also air cooled and still manufactured in Japan. 2013+ are FI which is an advantage. It's happy running 60 mph down the highway or plodding along on a tight trail at 5mph. I actually enjoy this bike more than the WR250R I had.
I've also owned a couple each DR650 and KLR650's but they're geared taller and are noticeably heavier for trying to trail ride with. But they're capable of running higher speeds on the highway.

Thank you, nice bike 😍
 

·
Registered
2021 Ridgeline Sport
Joined
·
892 Posts
A good friend of mine had a 1980 KDX 250 Enduro that he made street legal, all we did was put a Supertrapp exhaust on it, and rejetted the carb. He still ran full knobbies, but the bike was only good for about 65mph with stock gearing. Last time I talked to him around Christmas, he still had it , with 265,000 miles on it.
 

·
Registered
2006 Ridgeline RT
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter · #59 ·
So I've been looking around, and if I stick with 250cc I have lots of options in my price range, now my question is, how old is too old for easy to find parts

I found lots around 2006 in really good condition I've also found a few early 90's in decent condition, even a running 1980 XR 500

Im assuming the 1980 would be too old, but is there a specific year for the big 3 I'm looking at Honda, Suzuki, and Kawakaki that would not be worth repairing even if they run
 
41 - 60 of 74 Posts
Top