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My wife and I have just passed about 3000 miles towing behind the Ridge since September. This includes trips as frigid as -20 degrees and many-a Pacific NW mountain passes. Camping, concerts, skiing, a 2000 mile road trip, and even a wedding.

I just wanted to share some pictures of the combo and entertain any questions. It was highly difficult to pair the ridge with a travel trailer, but this combo has exceeded my expectations. ImageUploadedByAG Free1424150508.061287.jpg ImageUploadedByAG Free1424150532.403850.jpg ImageUploadedByAG Free1424150576.025976.jpg ImageUploadedByAG Free1424150607.658088.jpg


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Looks like a perfect sized trailer. Maybe 18' or so? We are looking at vintage trailers in the 15-18' range...although there's something so nice about a modern trailer like yours!

How did it pull? We have a small popup trailer (about 1,000 pounds) which tows super easy, but we only get about 13mpg when towing...I'd imagine a 2-3'000 pound trailer would drop that into single digits.

Anyways, nice looking setup there!
 

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Looks like a perfect sized trailer. Maybe 18' or so? We are looking at vintage trailers in the 15-18' range...although there's something so nice about a modern trailer like yours!



How did it pull? We have a small popup trailer (about 1,000 pounds) which tows super easy, but we only get about 13mpg when towing...I'd imagine a 2-3'000 pound trailer would drop that into single digits.



Anyways, nice looking setup there!

It pulls really nicely actually. The trailer probably weighs in around 4200 pounds when fully loaded. The specialty hitch and brake controller was a must. Gas mileage gets cut in half. I was actually thinking of adding a secondary tank. Hits a range of about 9-12 mpg on the highway, but actually does much better than that at slower speeds (55 or less). Highway on ramps and passing usually have the pedal to the floor, but it's nice and smooth on the flats even at high speeds. We have driven mountain passes on snow and ice, had 45 mph cross winds, and taken it off road through some rutted messes. No problems thus far beyond the limited fuel tank range.

The only time I ever saw sustained single digit mpg ratings was in a pretty vicious head wind in the high desert.


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It pulls really nicely actually. The trailer probably weighs in around 4200 pounds when fully loaded. The specialty hitch and brake controller was a must. Gas mileage gets cut in half. I was actually thinking of adding a secondary tank. Hits a range of about 9-12 mpg on the highway, but actually does much better than that at slower speeds (55 or less). Highway on ramps and passing usually have the pedal to the floor, but it's nice and smooth on the flats even at high speeds. We have driven mountain passes on snow and ice, had 45 mph cross winds, and taken it off road through some rutted messes. No problems thus far beyond the limited fuel tank range.

The only time I ever saw sustained single digit mpg ratings was in a pretty vicious head wind in the high desert.


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And yes, it's an 18 footer.





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I'm an avid camper also. I've opted for a small diesel MH as the wife likes to nap and use the washroom while travelling. I'm curious as to how you managed to keep your tanks and lines from freezing during your trips in cold weather?
 

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Timber...

This Remington travel trailer is built by Winnebago. It is essentially exactly the same as their Minnie Winnie. If you have ever seen one of those, you know what they are because they come in horribly bright colors (blood red, lime green, eye-melting yellow, etc).

I loved the Minnie Winnie for its features, but couldn't stand the colors. The fresh water tank of these trailers is enclosed in a box. One of the ducts from the heater actually runs to that box to heat the space around the tank. This helps, but it's not enough. I had heating blankets installed around the three tanks as well. I paired that with two deep cycle 6v marine batteries that are wired in a chain. This allows me to run the tank blankets for quite awhile without worry of battery depletion. The blankets turn themselves on and off at a certain temperature, but I generally have them off unless it's real frigid.

In the case of the negative 15-20 temps we camped in this winter, there is really nothing you can do to insulate for that. So, we left the fresh water tank winterized (blew out the pipes and tank with an air compressor because I refuse to put antifreeze in the fresh water tanks) and the water heater empty as well. In those temps we just brought along fresh water. However, we still utilized the toilet and sink by just rinsing with our water jugs and dumping some antifreeze in after every use. Doing that, along with the tank blankets running, we were fine. However, I left the antifreeze outside one night and it turned into slush. That's some serious cold.

Even with those temps outside, we found it to be 70 degrees on the inside of the trailer all night. We were plugged in, so we ran a little space heater paired with the gas furnace. The gas furnace rarely turned on overnight saving us some propane.

I'm pretty sure I could survive into the teens without freezing up with the tank blankets running and the fresh water full. Much lower than that and we become dependent on staying at rv parks with showers so we can clean up and not use the fresh water system.

We wanted this setup so we could camp at local ski areas. It's usually in the 20's at night in this area with low 30's in the day. This trailer set up allows us to do that without worry of the pipes or tanks.
 

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Timber...

This Remington travel trailer is built by Winnebago. It is essentially exactly the same as their Minnie Winnie. If you have ever seen one of those, you know what they are because they come in horribly bright colors (blood red, lime green, eye-melting yellow, etc).

I loved the Minnie Winnie for its features, but couldn't stand the colors. The fresh water tank of these trailers is enclosed in a box. One of the ducts from the heater actually runs to that box to heat the space around the tank. This helps, but it's not enough. I had heating blankets installed around the three tanks as well. I paired that with two deep cycle 6v marine batteries that are wired in a chain. This allows me to run the tank blankets for quite awhile without worry of battery depletion. The blankets turn themselves on and off at a certain temperature, but I generally have them off unless it's real frigid.

In the case of the negative 15-20 temps we camped in this winter, there is really nothing you can do to insulate for that. So, we left the fresh water tank winterized (blew out the pipes and tank with an air compressor because I refuse to put antifreeze in the fresh water tanks) and the water heater empty as well. In those temps we just brought along fresh water. However, we still utilized the toilet and sink by just rinsing with our water jugs and dumping some antifreeze in after every use. Doing that, along with the tank blankets running, we were fine. However, I left the antifreeze outside one night and it turned into slush. That's some serious cold.

Even with those temps outside, we found it to be 70 degrees on the inside of the trailer all night. We were plugged in, so we ran a little space heater paired with the gas furnace. The gas furnace rarely turned on overnight saving us some propane.

I'm pretty sure I could survive into the teens without freezing up with the tank blankets running and the fresh water full. Much lower than that and we become dependent on staying at rv parks with showers so we can clean up and not use the fresh water system.

We wanted this setup so we could camp at local ski areas. It's usually in the 20's at night in this area with low 30's in the day. This trailer set up allows us to do that without worry of the pipes or tanks.
That's some hardcore camping right there. Thanks for all the info, I will be looking at adopting some of solutions on my rig, should help a lot.
 
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