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"General Motors and Honda have agreed to jointly develop two all-new electric vehicles for Honda, based on GM’s highly flexible global EV platform powered by proprietary Ultium batteries. The exteriors and interiors of the new EVs will be exclusively designed by Honda, and the platform will be engineered to support Honda’s driving character.

Production of these Honda electric vehicles will combine the development expertise of both companies, and they will be manufactured at GM plants in North America. Sales are expected to begin in the 2024 model year in Honda’s United States and Canadian markets."


I would imagine they're going to use GM's forthcoming BEV3 platform.
 

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Who are you betting on? Subaru + Toyota or Honda + GM?
 

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I remember a press release from over a year ago saying Honda would partner with GM on autonomous vehicles. Since i hadn't heard anything in so long, i thought maybe the partnership died a quiet death, but it appears maybe it was just simmering on the back burner.

Edit: October 2018 -


GM did have good sales on their trucks for the first quarter, surpassing Ford's F-series. Ridgeline was one of the better quarter performers in the mid-size market.
 

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All EV's will fail until congress forces a standard battery that is easily replaceable and available at service stations. Cars can hold one battery- larger SUV's and Pickups 2 batteries - trucks 4 to 6 batteries.
It has to be designed so that the old battery can be read for left energy and the new battery the same - the technology to do that is here - must new laptops show how much juice the battery has left - it should be adaptable to car batteries.
You pay for the juice on the replacement battery less what is left on the one you trade in.
Without a fuel source that is universal all EV's are just fad vehicles and will fail to become the replacement for gas/diesel engines.

My 2 cents.
 

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It has to be designed so that the old battery can be read for left energy and the new battery the same - the technology to do that is here - must new laptops show how much juice the battery has left - it should be adaptable to car batteries.
You pay for the juice on the replacement battery less what is left on the one you trade in.
I believe you mean capacity instead of "energy" or "juice" (charge) since capacity decreases slowly and predictably over time while charge, of course, is constantly decreasing with use and increasing while charging.
 

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That would be akin to demanding all internal combustion vehicles use a standard powerplant.

The fuel EV's use is universal.
 

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All EV's will fail until congress forces a standard battery that is easily replaceable and available at service stations. Cars can hold one battery- larger SUV's and Pickups 2 batteries - trucks 4 to 6 batteries.
It has to be designed so that the old battery can be read for left energy and the new battery the same - the technology to do that is here - must new laptops show how much juice the battery has left - it should be adaptable to car batteries.
You pay for the juice on the replacement battery less what is left on the one you trade in.
Without a fuel source that is universal all EV's are just fad vehicles and will fail to become the replacement for gas/diesel engines.

My 2 cents.
Sounds like the trade-in propane gas program for grills, etc., at grocery & convenience stores.
 

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What standard powerplant - every EV uses different motors and different voltages so far.

EV fuel is not universal - some is lithium ion, other hydrogen fuel cell, some are ni-cad.

My suggestion is to remove the one thing that prevents it being accepted - travel anywhere and refuel anywhere.

So each brand can put whatever electric motor they want. Economy cars might have 150 HP and Performance cars 500 HP motors. You describe every car maker using different gasoline types - this is standard gasoline model for all vehicles
Battery makers have a standard size battery and connector for all US makes.
The Amp-hour (Watt-hour) capabilities of the battery might be different for different brands. The recharge cost might be different for larger capacity batteries than the lower capacity ones.
The vehicle manufactures can then do thing to enhance battery life like regenerative braking and part time 4wd or just fwd models.
You could buy a spare battery that had a limited battery (say 1/20 the container is battery and 19/20 empty) for emergency swap to get you to a battery swap station (that is also a service station).
EPA ratings would be done with a standard battery - you get X miles on this vehicle.
 

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Sounds like the trade-in propane gas program for grills, etc., at grocery & convenience stores.
The difference is you return an empty in that model and get no credit for a partially filled cylinder - you don't have to be out of juice in my model.
Just like gas pumps have to be certified for delivery - these measuring devices also need certification to make sure you are not being cheated.
 

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These aren't "AA" batteries... A Tesla P100D battery weighs more than 1300lbs and is formed around entire underside of the car for maximum efficiency. Think of the logistics of having service centers stocked with tons of batteries. Your plan makes as much sense as requiring all combustion engines having the same tank size and service centers stocking hundreds of prefilled tanks.

WIth battery tech improving every day and voltages increasing why would you want to strap yourself to a standard that will be outdated in a year or two?

They all have a common fuel source - electricity. You don't need a common battery, you need a universal Supercharger network that can handle all manufacturers' batteries. Which is what chargepoint, evgo are building out now. Eventually Tesla will cave to pressure and open up their network

Within 5-10 years we will be down to a quick charge that adds hundreds of miles in 5-10 minutes or so. We aren't even far off that now since the first 80% of the battery 'fills' so quick - a Tesla or Taycan can be at 80% (200mi+) in around 20 minutes.
 

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The battery can be different technologies- standard size and connector.
You don't need 1300 lb proprietary batteries. Besides Tesla EV's seem to self combust anyhow.
You really believe that Tesla's charger is the default. No two EV have the same charger connector.
I suspect electrocutions occurring in the rain at quick charge stations - and where is the extra electricity to power the chargers coming from - with standard batteries they can be charged at off peak times.
Tesla is not the solution - it is part of the problem.

Your comments remind me of those folks in the 1960's that said nuclear reactors will make electricity so cheap that we will no longer need meters. Yeah, Right.

There is no magic battery solution right now. The quicker you charge them - the hotter they get. Not all the energy goes to charging - some becomes heat.

Me - I think fuel cell were a better choice - but people are afraid of hydrogen (rightly so) but containers can be make to withstand a 70 MPH crash. The sad part is it is cheaper to extract hydrogen from natural gas than to cool it from the atmosphere or electrolyzed it from water.
 

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I don't think the public at large are afraid of Hydrogen. I think people want an immediate options and the EVs can do that working inside the current infrastructure and without the added expense of the hydrogen fuel.

Paying a lot more for fuel for you vehicle that's also more expensive than an internal combustion engine is the problem.

The folks making the electric cars have capitalized on that.
 

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Standardized, quickly-replaceable batteries are the only sensible thing if anyone truly wishes to change the fuel we use for transportation over to battery-electricity.
 

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GM and Honda go a long way, as far as the 1990s, if I remember correctly. With the whole Gen 1 Honda Passport (Isuzu Rodeo), the Saturn Vue having the J35 so they could have the Isuzu Diesel for the European market (I think), and more recently the Hydrogen fuel cell, this partnership seems to be a proven record.

I think the EV partnership is a wonderful welcome.
 

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GM and Honda go a long way, as far as the 1990s, if I remember correctly. With the whole Gen 1 Honda Passport (Isuzu Rodeo), the Saturn Vue having the J35 so they could have the Isuzu Diesel for the European market (I think), and more recently the Hydrogen fuel cell, this partnership seems to be a proven record.

I think the EV partnership is a wonderful welcome.
Yes, I think many would be good with an electric vehicle with dependable range and performance, including towing weight/distance, etc. We'd just plug in our phones, watches and trucks at bedtime and quietly proceed about our business in the morning.
 

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These aren't "AA" batteries... A Tesla P100D battery weighs more than 1300lbs and is formed around entire underside of the car for maximum efficiency. Think of the logistics of having service centers stocked with tons of batteries. Your plan makes as much sense as requiring all combustion engines having the same tank size and service centers stocking hundreds of prefilled tanks.

WIth battery tech improving every day and voltages increasing why would you want to strap yourself to a standard that will be outdated in a year or two?

They all have a common fuel source - electricity. You don't need a common battery, you need a universal Supercharger network that can handle all manufacturers' batteries. Which is what chargepoint, evgo are building out now. Eventually Tesla will cave to pressure and open up their network

Within 5-10 years we will be down to a quick charge that adds hundreds of miles in 5-10 minutes or so. We aren't even far off that now since the first 80% of the battery 'fills' so quick - a Tesla or Taycan can be at 80% (200mi+) in around 20 minutes.
Extracting hydrogen from a fossil fuel like NG completely defeats the purpose of using it, in spite of the fact that it's currently the dominant method of hydrogen production. Water electrolysis at scale is the holy grail for hydrogen, but because of the currently low return on net energy production, it enjoys less than 1/10th of 1% of the market. However, the explosion in solar and wind has the potential to ultimately bring truly "clean hydrogen" to market at a reasonable price. Until that happens, no thank you.
 

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"General Motors and Honda have agreed to jointly develop two all-new electric vehicles for Honda, based on GM’s highly flexible global EV platform powered by proprietary Ultium batteries. The exteriors and interiors of the new EVs will be exclusively designed by Honda, and the platform will be engineered to support Honda’s driving character.

Production of these Honda electric vehicles will combine the development expertise of both companies, and they will be manufactured at GM plants in North America. Sales are expected to begin in the 2024 model year in Honda’s United States and Canadian markets."


I would imagine they're going to use GM's forthcoming BEV3 platform.
I hope not. I personally think EV's are a waste of time and money. They pollute more because they need charging. Also, they never live up to the hype as advertised. Hybrids are the way to go and Honda makes wonderful hybrids.
 

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There are currently seven electric pickup trucks on the horizon in the US: Tesla's Cybertruck, Nikola's Badger, Bollinger's B2, Lordstown Motor's Endurance, Ford's electric F-150, GMC's Hummer EV, and Rivian's R1T. All of the vehicles have varying specifications and prices.
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I'm torn between another Ridgeline as my next vehicle, or an EV. EVs are the wave of the future IMO. Concerning pollution, as our country's infrastructure continues to move away from coal and petro, electricity generation will become cleaner and cleaner. As long as I can tow my MC trailer and have a bed for home projects, I'll be good. I wish the Rivian was not so doggone ugly! This is something I will watch closely for the next few years.

Concerning "battery exchange", Rivian already has a plan. I'm sure other companies will develop a plan, too.
 

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There are currently seven electric pickup trucks on the horizon in the US: Tesla's Cybertruck, Nikola's Badger, Bollinger's B2, Lordstown Motor's Endurance, Ford's electric F-150, GMC's Hummer EV, and Rivian's R1T. All of the vehicles have varying specifications and prices.
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I'm torn between another Ridgeline as my next vehicle, or an EV. EVs are the wave of the future IMO.
When it becomes time to replace our Ridgeline, I reckon all vehicles by then may be electric. But, that is depending on how all of that the necessary electricity is going to be supplied? All talk now is for removing hydroelectric dams, so that will no longer be an option. Is the earth going to be horizon to horizon wind mills, which are ugly and will take a toll on bird populations? Or solar panels which will take up food producing land, mean cutting down forests, and reducing recreational opportunities? Other?
Bill
 

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All talk now is for removing hydroelectric dams
I do not see this being widespread. However, in the past few years I have been surprised time and again by things happening in the US. I guess only time will tell!
 
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