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Discussion Starter #1
Thought I'd post some things I've noticed about my RL. I'm 63 and retired in 2012 from the tire and auto service business. I was the "go to" guy for tire, alignment, general service and tire warranty claim and processing. Those years give me a different perspective on what I like and don't like in a vehicle. Yes, I'm one of those people who trades new cars frequently. I traded a 2016 accord LX for this RL last week. I'll list a few likes, one mild dislike and some observations on my 2WD RTS.

I like the digital speedometer. Analog is best for temp and fuel since critical info grabs your attention at a glance. On the RL, the wheel doesn't block my view of the instruments like most do when adjusted for me.

The sunglasses holder is only shaped and small, kind of odd in such a large vehicle.

I'm glad Honda put reasonable size tires and wheels on. The Firestone OE tires are good. Mine are faultlessly round and balanced. In my years in the tire bizz, I grew to despise oversize wheel and tire combos. The added weight, cost, fragility of very low profile tires and wheels, poorer ride, greater difficulty to keep balanced and all for the sake of "style" or "stance". Sorry, rant over.

Like the torsion springs for the trunk lid instead of gas streets. But I wish Honda had used some gas struts for the hood. At least the hood is aluminum and short.

Minor dislike is the a/c compressor. Honda has stayed with the older cycling clutch design while most of the industry has gone to non-cycling designs. These use a variable swashplate that controls the amount of refrigerant pumped while the clutch remains engaged full-time. Both systems work fine but the newer variable displacement compressors eliminate cycling.

For the curious here, take care if you remove the engine cover. I managed to loose two of the four grommets. Got some new ones and lightly greased them all. You can use your fingers the feel the front pins aligning, then push the whole cover down gently. If all the pins and grommets are aligned, the cover goes on with almost no force.
 

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Minor dislike is the a/c compressor. Honda has stayed with the older cycling clutch design while most of the industry has gone to non-cycling designs. These use a variable swashplate that controls the amount of refrigerant pumped while the clutch remains engaged full-time. Both systems work fine but the newer variable displacement compressors eliminate cycling.
I used to see variable displacement compressors two decades ago on some GM products including my new '99 Regal that had a Harrison V5. By 100,000 miles, it was starting to get a bit growly. Each of the nine new vehicles I've purchased since then from a Honda Civic to an Infiniti G35 has had cycling clutch compressors. I'm interested to know which makes and models currently use variable displacement compressors.
 

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Thank you for your insights and observations, I appreciate your comments. They validate, like so many things on this forum, that I made the right decision on my purchase.

Comparatively, I did very little research on this vehicle before buying and I consider myself very lucky to have not had any of the negative issues that have been reported here. 2000 miles into it, all is well (except I still can't get weathertech mats yet).
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I used to see variable displacement compressors two decades ago on some GM products including my new '99 Regal that had a Harrison V5. By 100,000 miles, it was starting to get a bit growly. Each of the nine new vehicles I've purchased since then from a Honda Civic to an Infiniti G35 has had cycling clutch compressors. I'm interested to know which makes and models currently use variable displacement compressors.
Toyota, BMW and Audi are the ones I've seen. Audi and Toyota seem to have started using them in the early to mid 2000's, not sure when BMW started using them. I've been out of the business almost 4 years so I don't know who is using variable displacement compressors these days. I'd be interested to know, too. I shouldn't have said "most of the industry" was using these compressors, I'm assuming their advantages in efficiency and NVH are enough to be widely adopted.
 
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