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Discussion Starter #1
I bought my two ridgelines because they don't look like a conventional truck. Yet perform fantastically in almost every respect. I love my Ridgeline.

I have been blessed capable to purchase any vehicle I want, and the Ridgeline is, hands down, my most prized vehicular possession.

I just can't see ever being without my Ridgy. Sure some more fancy gizmo's would be nice, more power, better gas mileage, yada, yada... but I have other cars that do all that.

(Wow, that's alot of "I"'s! :act024: )

All this talk of a "conventional" bed, changing the Ridgeline "look" has me a bit worried.

Lets face it, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but we are all here because we really do "love" the ridgeline "look" as well as all the utilitarian features it has.

Please don't forget us Honda!

Amen brother! If the upcoming Pilot is any indication, which apparently it is, the next Ridgeline is going to fall short.
 

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Re: Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information

I've updated the original post to point out that it's my belief from a good source that the rumors about a "split tailgate" are not true. The way the tailgate works is essentially carryover. Even Car & Driver bit on this misconception. No split tailgate.

Additionally, yes there is a gap between the cab and bed. I have been given a lot of tech info regarding the reason and they all make sense to me. It allows for additional bed configurations (hint, hint).

As for bed length... here's a quick and dirty overlay. I can't give the exact bed length, but I'm sure some of you can do scaling. Some of you may be able to do a better job on the overlay, but this is an exclusive and does not appear anywhere else at this time. You should notice how closely the front ends and "cab" sections match. Many shared components between the two vehicles.

Am I the only one who thinks this really sucks? If you want a crossover or a truck that mimics MANY vehicles that were released several years ago, (Traverse, Edge, their own CR-V etc...), be my guest but a truck based off of the new Pilot which looks like a cross between an Odyssey and a CR-V is not the answer.

I'm sure mechanically the thing will be sound, but what does it take for these people to get a clue when it comes to styling?! Nice job copying everyone else's old stuff!

I have a feeling that this project is going to fail, or tow the typical Honda line, if for no other reason than this stuff is not NEW or UNIQUE to the average US consumer. It looks like everything else and there's nothing special about it. Some Honda people will eat it up but breaking new grounds and widening the demographic isn't happening.
 

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Re: Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information

I have a Canadian concern. With our dollar losing so much against the greenback in the last year, will this truck be affordable north of the 49th?
Wish it was still made in Alliston, Ontario.
 

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Re: Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information

20" wheels with (likely) lower profile tires? No thanks. Not a good combo on our unpaved roads and pot-hole paved ones.
 

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Re: Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information

I know you've heard this before, Joe, but thank you for all you've done to keep us up to date as much as possible, and in general for all the useful info that you've shared.
 

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Re: Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information

Thanks for the updates. I owned a 2008, and just bought a 2014 last year. Im getting the new model as soon as its released.
 

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Re: Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information

OK you [Makaze] and Joe have both essentially said that the GenII is "not a real truck." Why exactly???...
I had the same question, but it's not looking like we'll get an answer soon. We've been told that payload and tow ratings for Gen2 would be as good as or better than Gen1, and would be similar to competing mid-size trucks. FWD and IRS didn't make Gen1 less of a truck, IMO. So I can only speculate that suspension and drivetrain components (including the new AWD system) have lost some "beefiness" due to Honda's pursuit of weight reduction. This could also contribute to less offroad capability. But I'm just guessing here and hoping more information will be forthcoming...
 

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Re: Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information

...

"An all-new Honda Ridgeline pickup will join the Honda lineup within the next two years."
Yes, that was, indeed, the most disturbing line at the tail end of that press release. I hope that was an error, as Honda's 12/10/2013 headlined:

"All-new Honda Ridgeline Pickup to Debut Within Two Years"
 

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I'm creating this non-moderated thread so anyone can comment on the Next-Generation Ridgeline while keeping the "Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information" thread as clean as possible.
 

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Re: Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information

Am I the only one who thinks this really sucks? If you want a crossover or a truck that mimics MANY vehicles that were released several years ago, (Traverse, Edge, their own CR-V etc...), be my guest but a truck based off of the new Pilot which looks like a cross between an Odyssey and a CR-V is not the answer.

I'm sure mechanically the thing will be sound, but what does it take for these people to get a clue when it comes to styling?! Nice job copying everyone else's old stuff!

I have a feeling that this project is going to fail, or tow the typical Honda line, if for no other reason than this stuff is not NEW or UNIQUE to the average US consumer. It looks like everything else and there's nothing special about it. Some Honda people will eat it up but breaking new grounds and widening the demographic isn't happening.
Although you're entitled to your opinion, I'm of the opinion that the Pilot will succeed. This is one of the most technology advanced vehicle in it's class so I'm not sure what anyone could expect more. They may have stole a few styling ques from other makes, but without going too futuristic, which would be a fail for sure, they kept it civilized and gave it all they had without MDX'ing about it. We can't expect Honda to compete against their own so keeping la creme for the MDX is understandable and reasonable to expect. I predict people waiting and fighting and snatching these Pilots as soon as they're being delivered on the lots. I already know of a friend that just held off the purchase of a Highlander because he wants one of these instead. And he's a Toyota/Lexus guy that never owned a Honda. I'm of the opinion that he won't be the only one. Right now in Canada, some dealers can't get Highlanders as they're flying off the lots with waiting lists to snatch them. If Honda can keep supply and demand, they will steal the show for the next two years.

Will Honda do something stupid with the nest gen RL? Somehow, I think they will do just what's right to make it right that being an RL is not a Pilot. Some things will be different as trucks should be over SUVs.
 

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I'll be watching to see what really happens
 

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I will be buying Ridgeline 2 when it is out. Ridgeline 1 has been great like all the other Honda vehicles I have owned.
Like he said.:act035:
 

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There's been a lot of dissing the new Pilot all over the web, but I don't think the naysayers truly represent the core market for the vehicle. Instead, I'm inclined to believe the new Pilot has the right stuff to be a capable, class-leading family SUV. I think sales will be strong, especially if safety test results come in as expected, and Honda makes good on its renewed commitment to quality. And it looks like there's plenty of advanced technology in the new Pilot to carry into the next gen RL. The outcome will depend on how well Honda implements everything else needed to make the new RL a more efficient, versatile and functional truck than Gen1.

The biggest disappointment, IMO, is the failure of the ZF-9 to deliver the expected efficiency gains, possibly because of the reprogramming needed to smooth its quirky shifting characteristics. That's got to be causing a lot of strife for ZF, and it remains to be seen if they can overcome these setbacks. Regardless, it sounds like Honda is ready to move ahead with its own designs. The ZF-9 offered so much potential for the RL: lower gearing, faster shifting and better fuel efficiency. What a shame that hope has faded.
 

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There's been a lot of dissing the new Pilot all over the web, but I don't think the naysayers truly represent the core market for the vehicle. Instead, I'm inclined to believe the new Pilot has the right stuff to be a capable, class-leading family SUV. I think sales will be strong, especially if safety test results come in as expected, and Honda makes good on its renewed commitment to quality. And it looks like there's plenty of advanced technology in the new Pilot to carry into the next gen RL. The outcome will depend on how well Honda implements everything else needed to make the new RL a more efficient, versatile and functional truck than Gen1.

The biggest disappointment, IMO, is the failure of the ZF-9 to deliver the expected efficiency gains, possibly because of the reprogramming needed to smooth its quirky shifting characteristics. That's got to be causing a lot of strife for ZF, and it remains to be seen if they can overcome these setbacks. Regardless, it sounds like Honda is ready to move ahead with its own designs. The ZF-9 offered so much potential for the RL: lower gearing, faster shifting and better fuel efficiency. What a shame that hope has faded.
If Honda had a RWD platform the RL could've ended up with the ZF8HP, and that would be a fantastic transmission to have i the Ridgeline.
 

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The general trend in vehicle design these days is for brand identity. The Germans have had itfor decades. Now, everyone else is trying to come up with a brand identity by designing a family resemblance across their product line.

Ford tried the 3 chrome bars grill for a while and moved on to the Aston-Martin grill look. Think of the Audi front grill and signature LED daytime running lights, Lexus grill and LED running lights, Kia "tiger nose" grill, Hyundai just changed the grill to look like Audi's, Nissan's new V grill, Buick's waterfall grill, Chevy's split grill with bow tie, Mazda is going for a unified face across their line, etc..

So this talk about the resemblance of the new Pilot to the CR-V and Odyssey is on par with that's going on in the car industry; brand familiarity across the line. You know a BMW when you see one even if you've never seen that particular model before.

I don't have any insider info, this is just my observation that it looks like Honda is working towards having a familiar face across the line.

At any rate, for me, there is going to be a new RL in my future.
 

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I don't have any insider info, this is just my observation that it looks like Honda is working towards having a familiar face across the line.

At any rate, for me, there is going to be a new RL in my future.
Same here, a new Pilot or RL is in my future; at at my ripe old age, probably my last and 19th new Honda purchase. The only thing that might change that is my concern about the VCM and the auto start. Not a fan of either one.
 

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Re: Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information

I had the same question, but it's not looking like we'll get an answer soon. We've been told that payload and tow ratings for Gen2 would be as good as or better than Gen1, and would be similar to competing mid-size trucks. FWD and IRS didn't make Gen1 less of a truck, IMO. So I can only speculate that suspension and drivetrain components (including the new AWD system) have lost some "beefiness" due to Honda's pursuit of weight reduction. This could also contribute to less offroad capability. But I'm just guessing here and hoping more information will be forthcoming...
I still think that the "not really a truck" comment is intended to apply to both the Gen1 and Gen2. Reasons being it is front wheel drive, or it uses unibody construction etc etc. Semanitics? I have read nothing to indicate (other than people interpreting the above quote, and sounding like Chicken Little) that towing, payload, off road worthiness, storage capability, and overall toughness will be anything but improved in the next gen. Don't know why Joe hasn't commented on this??
 

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Same here, a new Pilot or RL is in my future; at at my ripe old age, probably my last and 19th new Honda purchase. The only thing that might change that is my concern about the VCM and the auto start. Not a fan of either one.
Cheer up. If what Joe suggested is true, Honda will allow you to turn those functions off. Repeating myself here, the default mode will most likely be VCM and Idle Stop enabled, but I'm betting you can override them by pushing off the "ECON" button. Also, Idle Stop is a higher trim feature on the MDX and Pilot that you pay extra for. We should know soon how/if these modes can be defeated.
 

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Re: Next-Generation 2017 Ridgeline latest information

I still thinks that the "not really a truck" comment is intended to apply to both the Gen1 and Gen2. Reasons being it is front wheel drive, or it uses unibody construction etc etc. Semanitics? I have read nothing to indicate (other than people interpreting the above quote, and sounding like Chicken Little) that towing, payload, off road worthiness, storage capability, and overall toughness will be anything but improved in the next gen. Don't know why Joe hasn't commented on this??
First off I have to make it clear that I have nothing to do with what the next-generation Ridgeline will be. I've offered input, but that's all.

All I can give are my opinions on this issue. You mentioned several criteria and I'll try and offer my opinion of what I believe the vehicle will offer.

Payload: I'll address this as the weight allowed in the bed. The first generation Ridgeline was rated at 1100 lbs. in the bed. Honda wanted the Ridgeline to be a true half-ton truck in that respect and they accomplished that. One of the safety priorities (that most other manufacturers ignore) was that in an accident the barrier between the bed and cabin was strong enough to prevent reasonable cabin intrusion even at full load. Looking forward I believe Honda is happy with bed load capacity and I doubt there will be any significant change.

Towing: It's my understanding that the towing capacity of the next-generation Ridgeline will slightly increase. The best information I have is that it will be above the current 5000 lb. limit but below 6000 lbs. That's why I listed my best guess at about 5500 lbs. I expect the tongue weight limit to remain at about 600 lbs. With that being said I think the next-generation Ridgeline will be a much more capable tow vehicle. The direct-injected engine mated to improved transmissions and AWD system will give the next-generation models much more off the line torque. The next-generation will feel like a race car compared to the first generation.

Off road capabilities: The new platform is much stronger than the first generation. The AWD system will be improved. Certain high stress body issues have been addressed. So the next-generation Ridgeline has the potential to have improved off-road capabilities, BUT as I've said for years this will be no rock crawler. In the first generation Ridgeline the approach angle was pretty good. If you look at the picture overlay in the other thread you can see that the front end is nearly identical to the new Pilot. The fact is that MPG means more than having a good off-road approach angle, and the less air you can keep from getting underneath the vehicle the better the MPG. So the bottom line is that I put the word "potential" in bold above because I expect that the next-generation Ridgeline will not match the approach angle abilities of the first-generation and we'll be lucky to keep the same ground clearance. Ironically enough the departure angle may actually improve despite the vehicle being about 2.5" longer. I have no idea what aftermarket lift kits, etc. may be possible for the new suspension. I know there was discussion of a Baja Edition that would have better off-road capabilities but I doubt it will become a reality. I hope I'm wrong about some of the above.

Storage capacity: Overall I'd say the two generations will be about the same overall. There will be plenty of spaces better designed for smartphones, pads, etc. and plenty of charging ports.

Overall toughness: I'd say that the strength of the new platform and the elimination of certain stress points give a significant advantage to the next-generation Ridgeline.

Again, keep in mind that all of the above are my opinion only. I don't speak for Honda or its suppliers. There are a few things that I actually hope I'm wrong about, but I have to say what I believe to be true at this time.

I don't know that I've answered all your questions, but I've done the best I can.
 
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