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Too funny (and not surprising, either, but always nice to have confirmation). There will always be the ignoranuses (did I spell that right? ;) ) that try to claim that I'm not American enough because I own a "Japanese" car, and even when presented with facts like these, they will continue to regurgitate their own delusions. Oh well. We know better. :)
 

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Oops! The link had gone dead, sorry. I thought it significant for all those who hear "I won't buy Japanese, because I only buy "Made in America"". Well, the Ridgeline is MORE American than Chevy's "Avalanche"! :D

Here's what the link stated.....

"Automotive Lineage Today Can Yield Some Surprises
Some ‘foreign' Models Made In America

By ANN M. JOB
Published on 10/12/2005 theDayCom

Go figure. Honda's first pickup truck, the 2006 Ridgeline, is more “American” than a Chevy pickup, the Avalanche. And the Toyota Camry is more “American” than the Chrysler 300.

The Ridgeline gets 75 percent of its parts from the United States and Canada, compared with 61 percent for Chevrolet's Avalanche. The Camry, built at an assembly plant in Georgetown, Ky., has 80 percent American content vs. the Canadian-built Chrysler 300's 72 percent.

The statistics are there on the vehicles' window stickers for every shopper to see.

Blame this weird world of automotive lineage on industry trends.

For years, the world's auto industry has been consolidating, with larger automakers buying others. Chrysler vehicles today are products of Germany-based DaimlerChrysler, and Ford Motor Co.'s portfolio of vehicles includes English-built Jaguars and Land Rovers as well as Swedish-built Volvos.

Also, foreign-based carmakers such as Honda, Toyota, Nissan, BMW and Hyundai have opened factories in the United States and many build both vehicles and parts — such as engines — on U.S. soil.

Add in the pressure on automakers to source vehicle assembly and parts globally as inexpensively and efficiently as possible, and you begin to see how complicated it can be for a car shopper today trying to “buy American.”

To be sure, the content information posted on every new vehicle can help. The so-called “domestic content” window label dates to 1992's passage of the American Automobile Labeling Act by Congress. The move was pushed by Detroit-based carmakers and the United Auto Workers union as Japan-based companies made inroads in U.S. market share.

The labels require manufacturers to formulate and post on every new model the origin of a vehicle's parts. Consumers also are told where a vehicle is built and where the engine and transmission come from.

Back in the 1990s, supporters of the legislation hoped consumers would shy away from cars and trucks with foreign content. But that hasn't happened.

In fact, automakers like Toyota and Honda, both of which are based in Japan but have factories in the United States, have continued to take market share away from the traditional Big Three.

“Consumer research indicates that for a lot of people (the Buy American issue) really doesn't come up,” said George Peterson, president of the automotive research firm AutoPacific Inc. of Tustin, Calif.

That's especially true of younger buyers, Peterson said.

“They're more open,” he said, noting that many young people are employed in services, rather than in manufacturing. “As a result, they're not tied to the union jobs of old and don't have the same sensitivities as did earlier generations.”

Dan Bonawitz, vice president of corporate planning and logistics at American Honda Motor Corp., also has seen little evidence that the labels impact sales.

“Our experience is people don't even pay attention to it,” he said.

There is debate over how useful the labels are. The domestic content label mixes U.S. and Canadian parts into a single “American” percentage, so there's no real way to know the U.S. content. Also, the domestic content is for parts only and does not factor in labor.

It's not always easy to find the labels. In a sample search at dealerships in Sacramento, Calif., domestic content labels on Nissans were found on the windshield, away from the pricing window sticker that shoppers look for. But on Chryslers and Mazdas, the content information was incorporated into the price sticker. On Hummers and Chevrolets, it was on a separate label next to the price sticker.

Meanwhile, automakers say gathering the content information is complicated, with an average vehicle containing some 20,000 parts."
 

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I have always been irritated by the "BE AMERICAN, BUY AMERICAN" bumper stickers. I was going to design my own that reads, "BE AMERICAN, HAVE THE FREEDOM TO BUY WHATEVER YOU WANT"
 

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This should put to rest the myth that the Big Three's problems stem from their workforce (but it probably won't). The quality problems the Big Three are plagued with find their source in the Board Room not he factory floor. These over compensated and under challenged clowns and those like them have tanked our manufacturing sector. Did you see the comment by the CEO of Delphi? He said that they couldn't get and keep good top management without huge compensation and seperation packages. These are the people who took them to bankruptcy for cying out loud! Wish I could increase my rates based on poor performance. Life would be sweet indeed.
 

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I love it! I will share it with my brother in law who has been employed with GM for 19 years and was very disapointed when I did not buy a Silverado and support an American Company. I am not putting down Chevy, they are just priced too high for the quality you get in the truck! I guess it's part of that $27.50 hourly(union) wage he makes that helps 'support' the high cost of their vehicles.
Mike :cool:
 

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While I don't really envy those folks getting paid for doing nothing, complaining that they feel like Vets that were not treated well is disrespectful of the Vets. They are being paid, they have benefits, they are hardly being treated horribly. They should look at the thousands of people who get laid off by large corporations every year who get a small severance package and then are left to find a job on their own. Not to mention for the work that a lot of these people do, they are very well paid due to the unions negotiated wages.

You would have to wonder though if the quality of the products could be brought up if they stopped producing vehicles just to get some of these people something to do.
 

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(Hawk) Oops! The link had gone dead, sorry. I thought it significant for all those who hear "I won't buy Japanese, because I only buy "Made in America"". Well, the Ridgeline is MORE American than Chevy's "Avalanche"!

I feel you on this one!:D
 

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