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2020 RTL-E Obsidian Blue Pearl, "The Blue Pearl"
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How many of you would not have purchased the Ridgeline if you could not justify to yourselves it being one way or another, "a real truck?"

Bill
The last truck I had before this one (yes I called it a truck) was 1999 2WD Ranger. It was also a truck. My current truck is twice the truck the Ranger was and my wife likes it a whole lot better. No justification needed for me either way.
 

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2017 Ridgeline AWD RTL-T
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How many of you would not have purchased the Ridgeline if you could not justify to yourselves it being one way or another, "a real truck?"

Bill
Nah, I did tons of research before buying it and knew well about the arguments and hate towards it. Before this I drove a little Matrix for 15 years. I'm very secured in my masculinity and understand that what I drive doesn't make me a "Man".
 

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The G1 Ridgelines were never 4WD; they have always been AWD, regardless of the badge on the tailgate. The G2 Ridgeline has a more capable i-VTM4 system than the G1 Ridgeline's VTM-4. That being said, I've never got my G1 Ridgeline stuck where I couldn't get it out with VTM-4 lock.

The i-VTM4 system can vector torque to individual rear wheels. The VTM-4 system can only vector torque to both rear wheels, but is still very capable.

I'd like to test the G2 Ridgeline on my split-mu test ground that defeated my G1 Ridgeline and G1 Pilot some years ago and see if i-VTM4 can successfully climb the test berm, but that site is off limits now.
Glad you corrected this, I laughed when it was mentioned "REAL truck with 4WD". 😆
 

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This is as good as place as any to share this where I just had a customer who complemented our 2019 as “One sexy truck” as comparing it to her boyfriend’s “Ugly” new 2021, (her words) (y)
 

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The whole NART thing cracks me up. I owned a 2014 SE and loved the truck but it had too many issues to deal with for what I was paying. The most notable issues were the sagging headliner, leaks, transmission issues, leaks, rear end issue and leaks. I ended up selling it back to Honda and have owned five Honda's since (two Accords, two Civics and a Pilot) and when the market comes to its senses, I may be back in the market. A good friend has a 2021 White Black Edition and it's very nice. Very nice.... in your best Uncle Eddy voice.

At present, I drive a 2021 Ram 1500 4x4 with the EcoDiesel engine and absolutely love it. I leave it in 4WD Auto more than 2WD and enjoy the mileage of the Diesel engine. I don't do truck-ish things (tow / haul) regularly but do enjoy the larger crew cab for the family, the dog and the occasional friend that needs a ride. When I have to do truck things, it provides plenty of power to do whatever the task requires. No complaints.

With this said, my friend is a "Richard" when he offers to drive. The Ridgeline drags the RAM through the mud in the comfort arena and I find everything is exactly where it should be.
 

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I think most of the NART crowd are people who are driving a vehicle to inflate their ego or they are compensating for something (or lack of something). Unless you two frequently or need true offroad capability, all the full sized trucks are just too big. They suck to park, they don't fit in most garages, the fuel economy is not very good, and handling is tepid at best. There really is no advantage to a full size truck over a Ridgeline unless you are towing or offroading. Yes, they do have more room, so I guess if you regularly have 5 people in your truck, then a full size is a good way to go.

My last truck before the Ridgeline was a 2013 F-150 crew cab. To fit it in my garage I had to hang a 3" hose on the wall of the garage. When I saw the hose move as I pulled in..I knew I was less than 3" from the wall. I could not shut my garage door if the tow ball was in the receiver. If I wanted to get anything out of my garage, I had to either climb through the truck, or open the garage door and walk behind the truck. There was only a few inches in the front and back and you couldn't walk around it. I worked in a metropolitan area where parking places were hard to find. I had to pass many of them up because there was no way I was going to be able to get the F-150 into the space. I think the heaviest thing I hauled with my F-150 was my motorcycle...which weighs 500lbs. The Ridgeline hauls it just fine.

For anyone to say the Ridgeline is "Not a Real Truck" is like saying wine from a box isn't "real" wine. It may look different, taste different, and smell different....but it'll still get you drunk. :)
 

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NARTs are clueless. The average RL buyer buys it for its capabilities, sophistication and comfort. If they don't like them they can go home in their gas guzzling buckboards. Honda sells every RL they can make. They don't need to look for buyers at all. To the average RL buyer, the RL is their only choice because nothing else matters.
I've had numerous compact, full and mid size pickups over the years starting with an 84 Mazda.. That was one of the best. The worst was an 87 Dakota. I'm on my second Ridgeline, I had an 06 for 7 years that I traded for a 14 4X4 RAM 1500 Hemi. It was fun to have the V8 but it rode like **** and it had mechanical issues even when sitting as it was a second vehicle. I decided to go to a single vehicle so I sold the Dodge and traded a CRV for a 21 RTLE Radiant Red. I love it. It rides phenomenally and the versatility is unmatched. I'm glad I got it when I did. You can barely even find one right now. Let them laugh with their disintegrating vertebra while we know what true luxury really is.
 

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2021 Canadian Ridgeline Sport
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So, some say the Ridgeline is NART. "Hey, my F150/Silverado 1500/ RAM 1500 is a Real Truck (TM)! It's full-size!"

But, wait. Although the nominal 1/2-ton trucks can be had with heavier payload capacities, many of them have a capacity of about 1500 lbs - the same as a Ridgeline, Santa Cruz or Maverick. Also, they have semi-floating rear axles rather than full-floaters. And 5-bolt or 6-bolt wheels. Sorry, buddy, not a Real Truck, either.

"But mine is a 3/4-ton! It's got a full-floating rear axle and 8-bolt wheels. It's a Real Truck (TM)!"

Again, wait! The manufacturer doesn't call it a Real Truck, they call it a Light Truck. Maybe it isn't a Real Truck, either.

"But mine is a 1-ton. It has a diesel and dual rear wheels. It must be a Real Truck (TM)."

Now we're getting somewhere. But where are the air brakes?

Let's face it. From the standpoint of guys who drive serious Real Trucks in which the transmission alone weighs a ton or more, they're all measly little four-wheelers. They're not Real Trucks. From that perspective, this whole thing seems like a pretty stupid argument. At one time, I occasionally drove an ex-military 6x6 converted for firefighting duty. It had air brakes, of course. It was a Real Truck.

By the way, with regard to towing, several new full-size SUVs from both Ford and GM have substantial towing capacities, despite having independent rear suspensions. I would suggest that a suspension design that does a better job of avoiding bounce when one rear wheel hits a bump probably does at least as well preventing trailer sway as the traditional solid rear axle. A rigid unibody design that can keep all four wheels in firm contact with an undulating road can tow a heavy trailer just fine. You need sufficient cooling, power, transmission strength and adequately strong suspension components for the job. Electric unibody pickup trucks with fully independent suspensions and towing capacities of 10,000 lbs or more have already been announced.

So what's a Real Truck? If you think it needs to be body-on-frame with a solid rear axle, you better be prepared for some escalation from people buying 400 gallons of diesel at a time at the truck stop.:cool:
 
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