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Discussion Starter #1
Finally got around to pulling the stock sub enclosure and getting some rough calculations. The subwoofer cutout is 7 3/16" and allows for 3" of depth without any modifications. I also painstakingly tried to get a rough volume. Due to the shape and pockets, one would have to seal up the speaker hole and slowly fill it from the small hole in the back to get more accurate than I did with my 2 part process. I filled from the speaker hole until running over, drained, then filled again with the box face down to try and get an idea of the volume forward of the woofer. Surprisingly, it held roughly 16 liters of water. Didn't fill I need to go any further with the experiment since the assumed 0.5-.55 cubic feet is plenty of volume for most 8" subwoofers. Seems Honda could have easily squeezed a 10" in there and satisfied all but the most serious bass head. Now to figure out what I want to do back there and probably return this Kicker 8" to Crutchfield.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Picked up a JL Audio 10TW3-D4 today. Going to try and squeeze it into a custom enclosure behind the seat in the stock location. Could be weeks or months with all I have going on.
 

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2019 RTL-E (white on beige) in central Texas
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Thanks very much for the enclosure volume info! (y) :)

Any chance you could post a pic of the back of the OE enclosure to show it's convolutions (we've seen many of the front, but not the back)?

And … the out-to-out height (vertical dimension as it sits against the back wall of the cabin) of the enclosure (not at the clipped-off upper-left corner looking at it) …. that'd be the limiting dimension for speaker diameter in a custom box to fill the OE box 'footprint'.

Thanks In Advance ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The box is roughly 12" tall and 25.5" wide which is why I think I can squeeze in a 10". You can see where the back is scalloped out for a brace. In the same area along the front, it is also shaped around the bracket that joins the 2 seats. There is only around 3" of depth in that area limiting the sub location to the left end of the box. There is some width to be had if one chose to not pick up the factory mounting locations.
 

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2019 RTL-E (white on beige) in central Texas
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Thank You @TriCamiguin for the additional information and pics; it's most helpful for we on the cusp of 'is it worth it or not?' to remove the seat for further detailed investigation.

Greatly appreciated, have fun with your project!

Building a custom enclosure can be fun and rewarding, BTDT, here's a work-in-progress pic of the enclosure I built to fit 2x Stereo Integrity BMmkV subs below the cargo floor of my '14 Escape:
398454

Those SI subs are 12" x 3.39" and require 0.5-0.7 CuFt volume for optimum performance.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Nice work. I will do something similar to the wife's Lexus one day. I have a rare NIB set of Xtant 10's that were going under the rear seat of the Ridgeline, but I prefer to keep that area for bike hauling duties. With the limited space and odd shape behind the seat of the Ridgeline, I'll probably have to resort to fiberglass unless I can convince JL Audio to do something.
 

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The box is roughly 12" tall and 25.5" wide which is why I think I can squeeze in a 10". You can see where the back is scalloped out for a brace. In the same area along the front, it is also shaped around the bracket that joins the 2 seats. There is only around 3" of depth in that area limiting the sub location to the left end of the box. There is some width to be had if one chose to not pick up the factory mounting locations.
Hey TriCamihuin! Thank you for your efforts and the measurements you found!
Did you ever modify the enclosure to accept a 10"? Or have you experimented with fiberglass? I really like the idea of upgrading our sound and adding low end response, but not at the expense of taking over the under-seat area.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Wasn't looking to modify the stock enclosure. Still have plans to build my own, but I work 60+ hours/week between 2 jobs so have not had the time. My back seat is still in a spare bedroom in the house.
 

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Did you ever modify the enclosure to accept a 10"?
One factor to consider if modifying the OE enclosure to accept a speaker driver offering much more excursion and cone-area than the OE for which it is designed .... a speaker driver optimized for a given sealed enclosure volume depends to a great extent on the overall rigidity of that enclosure for it's faithful reproduction of 'sharp' / 'crisp' sounds; enclosure 'flex' is the enemy.

While obviously formed with ridges etc to increase effective stiffness for the OE speaker, it's quite possible if not likely that a larger aftermarket speaker may 'tax' that design and cause flexing, to the detriment of it's SQ performance if one's music contains sharp / crisp bass.

IMO having now studied the RL OE enclosure and it's 'environs', it's quite possible to fabricate and fit a much more rigid enclosure of similar volume in the OE location using quality MDF or birch plywood as the primary structure. That with a modicum of skills and specialized tools that many can likely master sufficiently on a 'first try' with patience and care. I now know, for example, I can fab such an enclosure for the high-excursion (but shallow) Stereo Integrity 12" BMmk speaker I have in hand. That a speaker which in a rigid sealed volume of 0.5 - 0.7 cu ft delivers outstanding reproduction of crisp bass notes (e.g. jazz, symphonic music among others).

I've dabbled with fabricating rigid fiberglass enclosures; it's a wonderful method for conforming to really complex shapes when that is needed (e.g. a wheel-well in a trunk / cargo area floor). IME it's a major PITA when fabbing for large mostly vertical surfaces (e.g. to conform tightly to a trunk sidewall or vertical back-wall). IMO that degree of conformation and space-optimization isn't needed for the RL and would be a needlessly difficult fab given other easier options. In all cases it's a smelly, messy technique with lots of potentially hazardous materials / fumes / particulates and lots of skills and tricks needed to do it well. First efforts are rarely fully satisfying IME - there's a definite learning curve that goes with working the materials. IF you're already a practiced master of fiberglass fabrication .... it's a different thing entirely.

As always, just for your consideration and YMMV. :)
 
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Discussion Starter #10
One factor to consider if modifying the OE enclosure to accept a speaker driver offering much more excursion and cone-area than the OE for which it is designed .... a speaker driver optimized for a given sealed enclosure volume depends to a great extent on the overall rigidity of that enclosure for it's faithful reproduction of 'sharp' / 'crisp' sounds; enclosure 'flex' is the enemy.

While obviously formed with ridges etc to increase effective stiffness for the OE speaker, it's quite possible if not likely that a larger aftermarket speaker may 'tax' that design and cause flexing, to the detriment of it's SQ performance if one's music contains sharp / crisp bass.

IMO having now studied the RL OE enclosure and it's 'environs', it's quite possible to fabricate and fit a much more rigid enclosure of similar volume in the OE location using quality MDF or birch plywood as the primary structure. That with a modicum of skills and specialized tools that many can likely master sufficiently on a 'first try' with patience and care. I now know, for example, I can fab such an enclosure for the high-excursion (but shallow) Stereo Integrity 12" BMmk speaker I have in hand. That a speaker which in a rigid sealed volume of 0.5 - 0.7 cu ft delivers outstanding reproduction of crisp bass notes (e.g. jazz, symphonic music among others).

I've dabbled with fabricating rigid fiberglass enclosures; it's a wonderful method for conforming to really complex shapes when that is needed (e.g. a wheel-well in a trunk / cargo area floor). IME it's a major PITA when fabbing for large mostly vertical surfaces (e.g. to conform tightly to a trunk sidewall or vertical back-wall). IMO that degree of conformation and space-optimization isn't needed for the RL and would be a needlessly difficult fab given other easier options. In all cases it's a smelly, messy technique with lots of potentially hazardous materials / fumes / particulates and lots of skills and tricks needed to do it well. First efforts are rarely fully satisfying IME - there's a definite learning curve that goes with working the materials. IF you're already a practiced master of fiberglass fabrication .... it's a different thing entirely.

As always, just for your consideration and YMMV. :)
I concur with your sentiments. I have to get a good back wall template nailed down, then I will probably do a stack fab setup from there for the first 4 inches of depth.
 

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I upgraded the stereo components, kept the OEM enclosure in place, and replaced the subwoofer with an 8" Kicker - CompRT. After tooling around with it for about a month, I'm highly interested in seeing if a 10" shallow subwoofer might fit... with enclosure modifications, of course.

My thinking is that a 10" shallow Kicker sub might fit the bill. The specs say that the depth is 3 7/16" and the mounting diameter is 9 1/8". For the depth, I'm thinking a 1/2" speaker mounting ring would work. For the mounting diameter, I'm thinking a router or Dremel would work to increase the size of the opening. As a bonus, if the opening is at the surface - instead of recessed, the mounting ring might not need to be as thick.

I'm thinking of buying a replacement OEM enclosure to experiment. While I recognize that adapting the OEM enclosure to hold a 10" sub might not be ideal, but it just might work, right?
 
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