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The oil drain plug threads are stripped in my oil pan. Anyone know if anyone makes a self taping plug that is a little larger? I don't change my own oil but last place told me whoever did it before them put in the wrong washer and that caused threads to strip. Thanks in advance for any assistance guys.

safe travels
 

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I don't know about your RL, but my 09' has a 14mm plug.
There are kits out there that can cut new threads for oversizing & plugging the drain hole.
I would suggest removing the pan to do this procedure to prevent metal shavings from getting inside the pan.
Then again, since it's off to repair the threads, you could replace the pan too.
Pans usually run $80-$100, not sure if they come with a new gasket.

Edit: If you get a new pan, get a new drain bolt/plug & washer also.
 

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Same happened here @ approx 98K. Research reveals its a common issue with aluminum pan/steel bolts - caused by inattentive "service techs" thru a combo chronic over tightening, thread fatigue & cross threading. For me, it was unthinkable to adopt the *oversized* bolt solution cuz, as skelly mentioned, shavings in the lube system are out-of-the-question.

There are services out there offering permanent fixes like grade 8 nut/bolt combos - but they require shipping your existing pan to them so the nut can be tacked in place. No core exchange kind of thing. So you are off the street for the duration of the repair cycle. But it is a permanent fix.

Removing/replacing the pan involves removing a few under carriage components. Not a horrible job but it does take some time and most shops charge accordingly. Outside of swapping the pan w/new or modifying the existing, I'm unaware of viable fixes to this issue - someone else might know better.

If you go the new pan route, many have installed a Futomo or EZ Drain valve making it so changing oil is super easy and eliminates removing the drain bolt - totally resolving the dead thread thing.

Search this forum - within an hour you'll be well educated on this topic.

Adding generic google link: https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=honda+ridgeline+oil+pan+plug+repair
 

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Yes, for those of us who rack up the miles with our RL's, install a Fumoto drain valve and never have this happen to you. Many of us use them and never have need for crush washers ever again.
 

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For those of us who rack up the miles with our RL's, install a Fumoto drain valve and never have this happen to you. Many of us use them and never have need for crush washers ever again.
Adding to Mr. Dry Foot's recommendation, this is an EZ Drain version of the Futomo valve. When the threads in the pan are in good shape, installing one of these makes it so removing the standard drain bolt is not longer required. Like a faucet for your engine oil. A 1/4 turn of the valve lets out the old oil - no fuss - no crush washer or nuthin'.

EZValve_3.jpg
 

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Six is that the F-106 valve w/ the ADL-106 adapter?
Where did you get the metal 90* elbow?

Edit: I went to the site now and see it looks like the F316L maybe, but out of stock atm if that's it.
 

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Pulled the trigger on it, all 3 pieces w/ shipping was only $42.49 USD.
I think that's a good deal and a smart idea/product.
Thanks again Six
 

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Pulled the trigger on it, all 3 pieces w/ shipping was only $42.49 USD.
I think that's a good deal and a smart idea/product.
Thanks again Six
Notice how short the threaded portion of that adapter is?? Its a good recipe for pulling your threads of of the pan if you even slightly over tighten. Those adapter threads should be at least as long as the stock bolt!

To the OP. . .I installed an aftermarket drain plug that ended up having shorter threads than the stock one. A couple of oil changes later I noticed my threads had stripped out. I was able to find an aftermarket plug with a very long threaded portion (went to my local import car parts specialist) and it was a good temporary fix to the issue as the deeper threads in the pan were still good. I eventually installed a Fumoto valve, but milled the adapter so that its threaded portion was about 3/8" longer. It has been working fine for 10k miles now.
Go on Ebay and you should be able to find a self taping over sized drain plug. I personally wouldn't trust that as a long term solution but to each is own.
I actually own a high quality thread insert system that is designed to replace the damaged aluminum threads with permanent steel ones. I found the clearance around the drain plug to be an issue with the install and never actually did the repair.
If you are going to the trouble of removing the oil pan (exhaust pipe is in the way) then don't bother repairing the old one. Just buy a new one and slap it on, along with a Fumoto valve.
Have Fun!
 

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Notice how short the threaded portion of that adapter is?? Its a good recipe for pulling your threads of of the pan if you even slightly over tighten. Those adapter threads should be at least as long as the stock bolt!
Nope wrong.
To obtain full strength/clamping force of bolts, it only needs to have the same depth as diameter of thread engagement.

Besides, you wouldn't torque that steel bolt as per the torque chart given that it's engaged in a aluminum housing.
 

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Actually, the OEM bolt extends into the pan, beyond the threads. Using a short piece of copper bent to probe the distance between inner/outer pan surfaces the adaptor threads are more than adequate to engage all pan threads.
 

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I'm not sure I care for the hook (elbow) on that Fumoto valve. I prefer to attach a tube to the nipple extending straight out the back of the valve. My luck, I'd snag something and break the FV leaving me stranded on a cold, dark night. ;)

I can't really tell from the pic, but if it doesn't extend any further down than the body of the FV, then it's probably no worse than the way it installed on my Pilot... and I've had no issues over years and thousands of miles.



I figure if my FV gets snagged, I probably have other, more disastrous issues at hand to deal with.
 

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I'm not sure I care for the hook (elbow) on that Fumoto valve. I prefer to attach a tube to the nipple extending straight out the back of the valve. My luck, I'd snag something and break the FV leaving me stranded on a cold, dark night. ;)

I can't really tell from the pic, but if it doesn't extend any further down than the body of the FV, then it's probably no worse than the way it installed on my Pilot... and I've had no issues over years and thousands of miles.



I figure if my FV gets snagged, I probably have other, more disastrous issues at hand to deal with.
A few years back, Murphy invited himself along for a camping trip. Without even knowing where, how or when, something on the road got itself situated just right to break the fitting off the black water tank on my motorhome. Didn't realize it until someone used the head at camp - you can imagine what that was like. I sure hope there wasn't anyone following closely when that happened on the road.

Anything can happen I suppose but it would be real special for something to snag your Fumoto or an elbow.

I'd seen where flex hoses were used to route waste oil to another spot but it seemed like that comes with a certain amount of dripping residual oil left in the tube. How To: Install An Engine Oil Drain Valve - Chevrolet Colorado & GMC Canyon Forum

Everything comes with a certain # of trade offs. I rolled the dice anyhow.

EZDrain.jpg

BTW: I counted threads on both EZ Drain and Fumoto adapters, both hve 8 where the OEM plug has 9 (IIRC).
 

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Nope wrong.
To obtain full strength/clamping force of bolts, it only needs to have the same depth as diameter of thread engagement.

Besides, you wouldn't torque that steel bolt as per the torque chart given that it's engaged in a aluminum housing.
I don't know the exact length of the OEM bolt or the exact depth of the threaded portion in the pan, but I can tell with certainty that the Fumoto's adapter has a shorter threaded portion than the OEM bolt. It was close to a 1/4 difference. Also when I checked my 06 drain pain hole it definitely had more thread depth than the fumoto adapter and more than the OEM bolt. I can also tell you with certainty that the first aftermarket bolt that I purchased was the same length as the fumoto adapter. . .

You can quote text books or internet specs all you want but the reality is that the oil drain bolt sees a lot of use and is likely tightened beyond its proper spec by both pros and home mechanics. Do you really think that a bolt with a significantly shorter length threaded portion than OEM would be equal to OEM in its ability to resist pulling out the threads in the REAL WORLD?
 

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Actually, the OEM bolt extends into the pan, beyond the threads. Using a short piece of copper bent to probe the distance between inner/outer pan surfaces the adaptor threads are more than adequate to engage all pan threads.
Really? Then explain to me how the Fumoto adapter would just turn and turn and turn due to missing threads in my 06's pan. Yet somehow it is now holding fast and accepting full torque when I turned down the shaft and effectively increased its thread length by 3/8" You might want to measure again! I have at least 3/8" good threads remaining in side the pan. I know this because I checked!
 

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If that bolt extends very far into the pan, will you successfully drain out most/all the old oil?
 

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Really? Then explain to me how the Fumoto adapter would just turn and turn and turn due to missing threads in my 06's pan. Yet somehow it is now holding fast and accepting full torque when I turned down the shaft and effectively increased its thread length by 3/8" You might want to measure again! I have at least 3/8" good threads remaining in side the pan. I know this because I checked!
eurban are you saying you had to machine the body of the adapter to get the threads to engage?
 

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Really? Then explain to me how the Fumoto adapter would just turn and turn and turn due to missing threads in my 06's pan. Yet somehow it is now holding fast and accepting full torque when I turned down the shaft and effectively increased its thread length by 3/8" You might want to measure again! I have at least 3/8" good threads remaining in side the pan. I know this because I checked!
Not sure I could explain your experience but I can explain mine - at least, to the best of recollection.

What I know for certain is: the threaded portion of the OEM bolt is *exactly* 5/8" from back of washer to the tip that resides inside the pan, there are 10 threads total along the shaft.

The EZ Drain adapter uses an O ring seal, the Fumoto uses (what appears to be) a fiber or crush washer.

The EZ drain has 8 visible threads. The Fumoto has 7.

In either case, the 2 or 3 thread delta between OEM bolt and either adapter = approx 1/8".

When I fashioned a copper probe, it was to satisfy a mild curiosity about the difference in OEM bolt vs. EZ Drain adapter. In other words, it wasn't a sophisticated effort to be used as evidence of something somewhere in the future.

At the time, I was completely satisfied with the mechanical integrity of the adapter because (all things being equal) the purpose of installing a ball valve drain is to eliminate the need to ever remove a threaded seal again. So... when threads are in good shape, the "danger" of repeated removal and how deep stripped threads might be irrelevant. Especially in the context of the OP and myself - where a new pan is in place. No better time to (more or less) deploy a permanent solution.

Based on your experience, it sounds like "*if* an ball valve solution ever did cause an issue with pan threads, inserting the OEM bolt would (at least temporarily) resolve the issue.
 
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