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New member, first post, thinking about a Ridgeline. After lusting for a Tacoma over the years, I think Ridgeline is exactly what I need, and starting to like it now (2Gen).

Questions. Are their any evidence that the Ridgeline is "overbuilt" compare to the Odyssey/Pilot? Ridgeline is an underdog, so Honda has to try harder in the truck segment, I would think... Or do Ridgelines just roll out the same as all other products from the plant?

Thanks for helping out this NewB.
 

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The Ridgeline shares 73% of its platform components with the Pilot which shares 82% with the MDX. The Odyssey shares 47% with the Pilot.

Basically, the Ridgeline is a Pilot with an open bed and some strengthened components making it durable enough to withstand the additional towing and hauling expected of a vehicle with an open bed.
 

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New member, first post, thinking about a Ridgeline. After lusting for a Tacoma over the years, I think Ridgeline is exactly what I need, and starting to like it now (2Gen).

Questions. Are their any evidence that the Ridgeline is "overbuilt" compare to the Odyssey/Pilot? Ridgeline is an underdog, so Honda has to try harder in the truck segment, I would think... Or do Ridgelines just roll out the same as all other products from the plant? Thanks for helping out this NewB.
Before I bought mine I saw a YT video by one of Honda's chief design engineers that details how different some of the critical drive train parts--brake discs, wheel bearings, suspension components, etc.--are Ridgeline specific typical for a half-ton truck with a 5000 lb towing capacity. He visually compares Pilot and RL parts side by side, and the RL components are much bigger and beefier than Pilot's. Wish I would've bookmarked it but sorry.

Plus there are differences in the unibody frame structure found here: Honda Ridgeline - Wikipedia

So dismiss the noise out there that RL is just a Pilot with a bed. As ZRoger73 says, as does the article, RL/Pilot share 73% of components; the other 27% are those specific to address a truck's more heavy-duty needs. Hope this helps.
 

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Before I bought mine I saw a YT video by one of Honda's chief design engineers that details how different some of the critical drive train parts--brake discs, wheel bearings, suspension components, etc.--are Ridgeline specific typical for a half-ton truck with a 5000 lb towing capacity. He visually compares Pilot and RL parts side by side, and the RL components are much bigger and beefier than Pilot's. Wish I would've bookmarked it but sorry.

Plus there are differences in the unibody frame structure found here: Honda Ridgeline - Wikipedia

So dismiss the noise out there that RL is just a Pilot with a bed.
It's not "noise", sir. It's a fact that the Pilot serves as the basis for the Ridgeline. 73% of the Ridgeline's platform is shared with the Pilot. 100% of the powertrain is shared with the Pilot. 100% of the interior and sheet metal from the front doors forward is shared with the Pilot.

403256


Here's the video you were talking about.

 

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I found this Savage Geese review informative - especially the part (5 minutes in) where they get the Ridgeline on the lift and discuss the suspension, drive train, AWD system, etc. - while considering whether to buy a 2nd-generation Ridgeline.

 

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Before I bought mine I saw a YT video by one of Honda's chief design engineers that details how different some of the critical drive train parts--brake discs, wheel bearings, suspension components, etc.--are Ridgeline specific typical for a half-ton truck with a 5000 lb towing capacity. He visually compares Pilot and RL parts side by side, and the RL components are much bigger and beefier than Pilot's. Wish I would've bookmarked it but sorry.

Plus there are differences in the unibody frame structure found here: Honda Ridgeline - Wikipedia

So dismiss the noise out there that RL is just a Pilot with a bed. As ZRoger73 says, as does the article, RL/Pilot share 73% of components; the other 27% are those specific to address a truck's more heavy-duty needs. Hope this helps.
Historian is right. I saw the same video with the engineer from Honda. The upper and lower control arms, the strut assemblies, the coil springs, the hubs and bearing units are all way beefier than the pilot. The "pilot with the back cut off" is just noise.
 

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Historian is right. I saw the same video with the engineer from Honda. The upper and lower control arms, the strut assemblies, the coil springs, the hubs and bearing units are all way beefier than the pilot. The "pilot with the back cut off" is just noise.
I think aesthetically it is a "Pilot with a bed" - which makes sense given the 73% component sharing - but it's the 27% non-Pilot components that makes it a truck.
 

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Historian is right. I saw the same video with the engineer from Honda. The upper and lower control arms, the strut assemblies, the coil springs, the hubs and bearing units are all way beefier than the pilot. The "pilot with the back cut off" is just noise.
Not just noise. Contributes to a simplified, inaccurate representation of what the truck is capable of, one that fuels the YT brodozer trolls and N.A.R.T. simps.
 

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New member, first post, thinking about a Ridgeline. After lusting for a Tacoma over the years, I think Ridgeline is exactly what I need, and starting to like it now (2Gen).
Good choice. Toyota really messed up the current generation Taco by putting in the 3.5 Camry engine mated to the absolute worst 6-speed ever. I demo'd one and had back to my broker in less than an hour. Constant up/down indecisive shifting that defined annoying, and no way (unlike RL) to manually shift. If I were to buy one, it'd be the manual transmission model. But I still think they're uncomfortable and unrefined trucks that are beyond dated. I have read in the next couple years Taco and Hilux production lines are to be merged as a cost-saving measure, and that there will be a redesign that will fall into more what the Hilux is--a more comfortable and refined mid-size truck with a turbodiesel option in N America.

If you want to see something that reflects the Taco's current state of sales, go on any used car app and search for a 2014 or 2015. Good luck finding one with low miles, and if you do, you pay top $$.
 

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Am I wrong or is the Pilot AWD have the same 5,000 tow capacity? If the Pilot is rated at 5,000 with the beefier components in the RL, wouldn't it be rated higher? Nm, there are posts talking about this. Not sure how to delete my comment :)
 

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Am I wrong or is the Pilot AWD have the same 5,000 tow capacity? If the Pilot is rated at 5,000 with the beefier components in the RL, wouldn't it be rated higher?
The Pilot has a towing capacity of 3500 lbs. and GVWR of 5800 lbs. The Ridgeline has 5000 lbs and 6020 lbs respectively.
 

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The Pilot has a towing capacity of 3500 lbs. and GVWR of 5800 lbs. The Ridgeline has 5000 lbs and 6020 lbs respectively.
Not really. 2wd Ridgeline and Pilot have 3500 towing capacity. The AWD versions have 5000lbs respectively.
Towing limit of 5k seems to be based on what they have in common rather than in the ways that the are different.
 

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...
Before I bought mine I saw a YT video by one of Honda's chief design engineers that details how different some of the critical drive train parts--brake discs, wheel bearings, suspension components, etc.--are Ridgeline specific typical for a half-ton truck with a 5000 lb towing capacity. He visually compares Pilot and RL parts side by side, and the RL components are much bigger and beefier than Pilot's. Wish I would've bookmarked it but sorry.
...
The one I remember of this was one by, ahem, Honda Pro Jason...
Parts different from Pilot starts at about 8:25.

Also, watch a discussion with Kerry McClure, Large Project Leader.
Suspension differences outlined beginning around 13:00...
 

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The 2016-2020 AWD Pilot with the 6-speed requires the accessory cooler (which is standard on AWD Ridgelines) to increase tow rating from 3,500 lbs. to 5,000 lbs.
So in Honda's figuring, it's transmission cooling that is the limiting factor for towing more than 3.5k and up to 5k lbs. The beefier Ridgeline components (cooler excepted) don't get you a higher tow rating. . . .Another way to think about it is that 6spd AWD Pilots are over engineered to tow 3.5K except for transmission cooling.
Power train would seem to be an obvious limiting factor to go beyond 5k. Other limitations are likely including the fundamental unibody structure (at least as executed in the current Pilot / Ridge / Passport)
 

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So in Honda's figuring, it's transmission cooling that is the limiting factor for towing more than 3.5k and up to 5k lbs. The beefier Ridgeline components (cooler excepted) don't get you a higher tow rating. . . .Another way to think about it is that 6spd AWD Pilots are over engineered to tow 3.5K except for transmission cooling.
Power train would seem to be an obvious limiting factor to go beyond 5k. Other limitations are likely including the fundamental unibody structure (at least as executed in the current Pilot / Ridge / Passport)
If cooling is not the limitation, and suspension hardware is not the limitation, then the Pilot should be able to tow as much or more than the Ridgeline based on body configuration alone. IOW, the addition of the D-pillar gives the Pilot the edge wrt body distortion during towing.

With unibody, SUVs are better tow vehicles than pickup trucks ALL ELSE BEING EQUAL. The Jeep Grand Cherokee unibody is rated to tow 7200lbs, but it does have a longitudinal transmission that lends itself to better cooling.

One advantage Ridgeline does have over Pilot wrt towing is the longer wheelbase.

I don't think power is an issue. It would be very interesting to see what the Ridgeline could tow (to J2807 standards) if transmission cooling was not an issue.
 

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I was reading around on tacomaworld because I was just curious since technically tacos have an extra ~1500 lbs and it seems Honda was just super safe which has been mentioned. Most owners on tacoworld are recommend staying within numbers with the RL and several have said that the taco should have never been advertised with a tow rating over 5000 even some mention nothing over 4000. My guess is since they are trying to keep up with the others they didn't take the conservative approach that Honda did. It just goes back to what several have said on this board that if your going over 5000 you might want to look at a full size truck, not sure about the GM twins or Ranger. Even though the Pilot and RL can obtain equal numbers, my guess it the RL will be better equipped to handle that 5000. Just my uneducated observation :) I was just curious about the other midsized since the RL get's bashed for it's low tow rating but I'm glad that Honda took the safer approach instead of trying to squeeze out numbers just to keep up with the pack at the risk of safety.
 

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If cooling is not the limitation, and suspension hardware is not the limitation, then the Pilot should be able to tow as much or more than the Ridgeline based on body configuration alone. IOW, the addition of the D-pillar gives the Pilot the edge wrt body distortion during towing.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee unibody is rated to tow 7200lbs, but it does have a longitudinal transmission that lends itself to better cooling.
The unibody Nissan Pathfinder is rated to tow 6,000 lbs. in either AWD or FWD. It has a transverse V6 with similar output to the Ridgeline and a CVT. :)
 

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The unibody Nissan Pathfinder is rated to tow 6,000 lbs. in either AWD or FWD. It has a transverse V6 with similar output to the Ridgeline and a CVT. :)
I think Nissan has a pretty spotty record with CVTs. I think Jason Fenske had a video about CVTs that could handle high torque loads, and a Nissan CVT was featured. Maybe they put that one in the Pathfinder, and put some under-engineered CVTs in their smaller vehicles that have been giving people fits.
 
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