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Have you found moisture under your rear flooring in your 2017+ Ridgeline?

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After checking my 2020 after a hose down, I was not shocked that there was moisture under the driver side rear seat. I'm at 30k miles and usually deal with most stuff like this myself but being in warranty, going to let the dealer work on it (then repair their reassembly work - as always).

I will check the grommets first as noted above but I think based on leak rate, it is the seam issue. Just poor design and half assed assembly but not surprising anymore after also having a 2017 G2.

Not that it'll have less issues but put my $100 reservation on a F-150 Lightning already for summer 2022.

I bet if we could guarantee ALL the replies on the survey actually pull the sills and hit the drain areas with a hose, that the leak rate would approach 50%.
 

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So if you pull the five panels at the back of the cab under the seats and hit it with water that will tell you whether you have a leak or not?

I'll more than likely be purchasing mine early next month and i'd like to get this out of the way when I get home. I don't see them "fixing" this problem at the plant any time soon so I guess i'll take my chances.
 

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These rear cab leak threads are troubling. Just speculating here. Maybe it's more than a manufacturing issue? Isn't that a vulnerable part of the unit body design that they had to beef up when they changed the bulkhead (fortress) around from the G1?. Is it a flex issue? Remember that gentleman that had the body creak so he dumped his RL for a Ram. I wonder if that one had a noticeable leak. It's kind of strange that water doesn't easily dissipate of a vertical surface like the back of a cab. Window seals and grommets I can understand but body seams they miss so many? I think there's more to the story and if Honda ever gets around to it maybe they'll do the good old countermeasures until a redesign. Other than the shared issues between the Pilot and RL (injectors, frozen fuel fillers) the remaining pattern issues stemmed from design elements and parts mutually exclusive to the Ridgeline like the tailgate harness and the harness that had a splice outside the cab on early 2017's. Hopefully, the problem is not as widespread as these forum posts suggest. Honda should investigate this.
 

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These rear cab leak threads are troubling. Just speculating here. Maybe it's more than a manufacturing issue? Isn't that a vulnerable part of the unit body design that they had to beef up when they changed the bulkhead (fortress) around from the G1?. Is it a flex issue? Remember that gentleman that had the body creak so he dumped his RL for a Ram. I wonder if that one had a noticeable leak. It's kind of strange that water doesn't easily dissipate of a vertical surface like the back of a cab. Window seals and grommets I can understand but body seams they miss so many? I think there's more to the story and if Honda ever gets around to it maybe they'll do the good old countermeasures until a redesign. Other than the shared issues between the Pilot and RL (injectors, frozen fuel fillers) the remaining pattern issues stemmed from design elements and parts mutually exclusive to the Ridgeline like the tailgate harness and the harness that had a splice outside the cab on early 2017's. Hopefully, the problem is not as widespread as these forum posts suggest. Honda should investigate this.
I don't think it is a strength issue. If you look at the body-in-white diagrams and pictures released when the truck was new:

Honda Ridgeline’s Frame: The Untold Story

You can pretty clearly see what is the massive structural bulkhead that carries the loads that were formerly taken by the buttresses. It is the big unit that basically runs around the rear window and then down to roughly the bottom of the bed. That makes structural sense because the loads from the bed and aft body have to go somewhere to distribute them into the roof structure and the rest of the unibody.

But, you can also see that since this structural bulkhead ends at roughly the bottom of the bed, the floor pan apparently joins the structure at this same point. This forms the seam that Celltech was referring to. It seems to be a horizontal pinch weld that has a large amount of sealer applied to try and keep the water out. Obviously not very successfully... The fact that this seam is horizontal (better for water intrusion) vs a downward vertical pinch weld, AND it just happens to be located where the bed drains are located at the front of the bed, is apparently a poor design choice that invites massive amounts of water exposure at a seam that is apparently not very waterproof. Once it gets in there, where it comes out depends on the entry point, and what is left between the water and floor. I'd really like to see one torn apart in person so I could get a feel for the actual structure back there.

The other seam is roughly under the rear cab, nearly underneath where the seats mount, as far as I can tell. It isn't sealed at all and could also be an entry point.

I understand why Honda did what they did with the bulkhead but why terminate the bulkhead where they did and then join it to the floorpan where they did and then drain all of the water right on top of it? It is just inviting this issue, IMO.

I agree it's troubling, especially when we see brand new trucks with the issue, which means it isn't going to get better with age. Mine is a 2021 with less than 2,000 miles on it. It is a very early build with a VIN less than 3000 and a Jan 2021 build date. However, since they have built somewhere around 100K of these things since 2016 and they all have seem to have the same issue, there is obviously a different cause, and is most likely a design issue.
 

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These 5 seat belt and hardware panels...they more or less just pull straight out:

View attachment 413670
Ok pulled them out being careful not to bend the panel pins. Saw the two grommets that seemed to be tight and dry. Also found the subwoofer speaker right behind the first small panel on the passenger side just above the rear floor. Hope this does not enter into the water problem equation!!
 

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Also found the subwoofer speaker right behind the first small panel on the passenger side just above the rear floor. Hope this does not enter into the water problem equation!!
Nah...the sub box is above the carpet and seems pretty protected. It connects to the back wall with 4 bolts and does not introduce any holes for water.

So is your carpet dry?
 

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Damp but not totally bone dry. Some light moisture on the floor. Not yet sure where it is coming from. The carpet padding is damp but not soaked.
I was going to wait to post the following photo until I got a direct visual look. Maybe appropriate if looking for a passenger side leak near that's rear speaker. This was taken on the passenger side looking upwards toward the front of the truck, fuel tank is to the left. I had a lousy blind photo angle, need to get the truck elevated and crawl underneath for a better perspective. Likely the speaker is on the other side of the sheet metal. Notice the 3 exposed body holes in the yellow circles. Maybe the body plug guy had the day off? That's also water dripping from them from my water in the bed test.

413705

413706
 

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Currently have my rear seat removed and the carpet folded back to expose the bare floor across that entire seat frame riser. Then water tested only the unsealed forward seam with the hose pointed only at the seam. Bingo, it leaks. Then repeated the hose in the bed and let gravity work to drain out the forward drains. Holy cow what a flood inside. This time on both sides of the cab, entering the cab entirely from the drain slots along the bottom of the seat frame riser, and it was all I could do to catch the water with a bath towel at the rate it was infiltrating. I'm also gaining a sense that Honda knows all about this leakage because they placed a foam blocker seal about 3" inside the ends of that seat riser. That blocker diverts any water into the carpet foam and keeps it from flowing out the ends of the riser toward the door sills.

I'm going to let my truck dry out while trying to figure out how to gain access to that seam without dropping the fuel tank. Thinking maybe working through the fuel pump access panel, but that's working blind and not much room to work.

After getting this deep into the problem, I'm convinced there are 2 types of Ridgelines... The ones that are known to leak, and the ones where it hasn't been noticed yet. This is a shame.
 

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I'm going to let my truck dry out while trying to figure out how to gain access to that seam without dropping the fuel tank. Thinking maybe working through the fuel pump access panel, but that's working blind and not much room to work.
How long until you just cave in and pull the bed out? And thanks SOOOOO much for doing this work. We have to get traction on this issue up the Honda chain somehow...
 

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How long until you just cave in and pull the bed out? And thanks SOOOOO much for doing this work. We have to get traction on this issue up the Honda chain somehow...
A huge part of the problem actually getting this fixed is hyper-focusing on the most visible body seam that has all that sealant. Why??? most likely because some over-educated engineer already said to goop it up while on the assembly line, followed by a dealer service tech chasing down an owners complaint that looks at the seam covered in goop and applies more goop. They are totally distracted and missing the problem. And why the heck didn't they seal that forward seam at the factory? It makes absolutely no sense, almost to the point of product liability type nonsense.

Think I'm going to get a gallon of elastomeric roof coating. Will topcoat over the factory sealant on the visible rear seams using a paint brush just in case something there is porous. Then squeeze a sealer into that unsealed seam as best I can, followed by a topcoat of the other. Will likely need to find sealant in a hand-squeeze tube or use something like a cake decorator's piping bag to work on that seam through the fuel pump access panel. Or might use a tape over that seam. Another thought would be to glue a plastic 90-degree angle to the drip edge of that gooped-up rear sealed seam. If the water coming off the bed drains is flowing straight downward over that 90-degree angle, maybe it won't curl under the seam lip and run horizontally to that unsealed seam. Just a thought.
 

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Currently have my rear seat removed and the carpet folded back to expose the bare floor across that entire seat frame riser. Then water tested only the unsealed forward seam with the hose pointed only at the seam. Bingo, it leaks. Then repeated the hose in the bed and let gravity work to drain out the forward drains. Holy cow what a flood inside. This time on both sides of the cab, entering the cab entirely from the drain slots along the bottom of the seat frame riser, and it was all I could do to catch the water with a bath towel at the rate it was infiltrating. I'm also gaining a sense that Honda knows all about this leakage because they placed a foam blocker seal about 3" inside the ends of that seat riser. That blocker diverts any water into the carpet foam and keeps it from flowing out the ends of the riser toward the door sills.

I'm going to let my truck dry out while trying to figure out how to gain access to that seam without dropping the fuel tank. Thinking maybe working through the fuel pump access panel, but that's working blind and not much room to work.

After getting this deep into the problem, I'm convinced there are 2 types of Ridgelines... The ones that are known to leak, and the ones where it hasn't been noticed yet. This is a shame.
i've been told by my dealer that this seam can be accessed by moving the rear wheel well liners
 

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i've been told by my dealer that this seam can be accessed by moving the rear wheel well liners
Not the unsealed seam that's leaking on mine. My fender liner is already out, it's much further forward. Your dealer is talking about the seam at the top of the photo. Look way in the back of the photo inside the yellow box. That's forward of the fuel tank.
413712
 

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Would bed drain tubes that take the water from the bed area down past the frame (that wraps the water around to the seam) workk to allow the water past that area and take it instead down to the ground ? Seems like a simple solution.
 

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Also, on my 17" that doesn't show a leaking problem, could it possibly have helped that I used that sticky based fluid film, which could have flowed into those exposed seams, allowing it to block this water leakage as mentioned ?
 

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Not the unsealed seam that's leaking on mine. My fender liner is already out, it's much further forward. The dealer is taking about the seam at the top of the photo. Look way in the back of the photo inside the yellow box. That's forward of the fuel tank.
View attachment 413712
I think my investigation syncs with yours on the source of the leak. It appears my moisture is more from the area ahead of the tank you discuss above (aka in the forward portion of the yellow box in your pic). I'm trying to provide as much guidance as possible to the techs for my June 2 dealer visit (still under warranty).

However, unless I tell them what to do and they actually do it, I'd be better off doing it myself. I couldn't recreate leakage at the seam that most ROCers are looking at. I will do some more water tests prior to the dealer visit. My moisture seems to be middle of the rear seating position on the drivers side. Frustrating that all/any of us have to even deal with this.
 

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If you're looking for a good sealer to use for the life of the truck use a product called solar seal. I use it on exterior surfaces on buildings and it's the most impervious stuff I can find. Extremely sticky too it sticks to everything. It comes in a normal caulk tube.
 
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