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Discussion Starter #1
If 10 RLs come off the assembly line, a certain percentage have to get the stated MPG. So what is different about the ones that don't get it? or ones that get way above it?

1. Engine tolerances, the way the pistons fit etc.

2. Something in the drive train, like bearings.

3. Maybe the brakes are rubbing.

4. Something else.

If it was 2 or 3, would it be worth checking to make sure the rotors spin freely and with the same amount of force, if one doesn't maybe repacking the bearings or loosening the nut that holds it all together to let it spin easier.

Anyone else think about crap like this or am I the only one?

Kevin
 

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hkmail,
Significant variable is gas formulation, but I never see this discussed.
What region of country? Is ethanol added?
 

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Great question!!! However, your first point should be Tire Pressure. Second point should be Gross Weight of Vehicle. Third point should be Environmental Elements including time of day, ambient temperature, and altitude. Fourth point should be Driver -- you'll surely have to find a way to standardize this variable.

Again, great question.
 

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Also, you have to measure apples to apples -- RLs that are past their first oil change, and RLs that are not. The oil that ships with the vehicle is a "break-in" oil for the engine; it won't give you the best gas mileage, but your engine will be happier for longer if you go through the break-in process.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am still holding on to the hope that my mileage will increase at the 5000 mile point. I will post either way. I only have 1000 on it now, so it will be a while.

Back to the basic question. i use to rent chevy luminas for work and driving the same way, same gas, same everything except a different rental car. Some would get 25 MPG and some would get higher or lower, but one got a constant 35 MPG. So what parts of the car or our RL most affect the mileage. Are there parts we can modify or is it completely inside the engine.

Kevin
 

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I run my tires at 34 psi, just filled up tonight and got 19.3 mpg. 5,500 miles still with original factory break in oil. My truck also rolls freely with no drivetrain resistance. I take my foot of the accelarator and it seems I always need to apply brakes to slow it at the right moment. It seems to coast much more freely than my other vehicles.

I've heard more inflated tires give better mileage. Though, it may effect ride quality.
 

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Many parts, variables, and mechanisms effect MPG. Tires (pressure and type, as it corresponds to weight and rotational resistance), wheel weight, air temp, terrain, altitude, cargo, wind direction, gasoline quality, oil type and viscosity, aircleaner element, slight variances in engine production, driving habits, transmission function, wheel bearing resistance, exterior accessories (racks, steps, bras, bed covers, bug deflectors etc.), engine temp, and countless other major or minor variables. No two vehicles could be exactly the same in regard to MPG. The manufacturing process alone isn't THAT perfect. I do however find your story about the Chevy Lumina being TEN MPG different than the others rather interesting. That's a huge difference!
 
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