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A bit of background…
:wink:
About 9 months ago I purchased a 2017 RTL-T and was making several 300 mile trips between locations where the speed limit most of the way was at least 65 MPH. I was consistently getting 27 to 28 MPG and I was thrilled that I was doing better than the advertised highway MPG of about 25 MPG.
But I had buyers remorse in that I feel as if I gave up way too many options that I wanted because I cheeped out on the “T” versus the “E” model, so I did the expensive thing and traded in my RTL-T for a loaded up Black edition. There was some reason to my madness because the trade in reduced my sales tax by over $2000 which helped make up for the dealer trade in price versus private party price. But that is not the point of this tome.

The first major issue I ran into with the Black was that my gas mileage during the same trips tanked. I had difficulty hitting the 20 MPG mark, which is a significant drop in my opinion. The dealer had installed some off road type heavy duty tire and I wondered how much that impacted MPG. The saga worsened. At only 2800 miles, I had an engine warning light come on. The diagnostics indicated a failed fuel tank pressure sensor. That was changed and the light immediately came back on. Next to fail was the emissions canister, which evidently caused the sensor to fail. It turns out that it was full of water. WTF? Bad design? No, the factory left of a hose connected to the canister, which allowed the infiltration of water. So much for factory QC. Yes it was all warranty work.SO I said to the service guy, “could this have caused the tanking of my MPG”, which he happily suggested was likely. Horse hooey.

Since that time, my MPG is still essentially the same. The best I ever got for a short burst was about 22 but that was only once. So my owners club friend, here is the crux of the discussion. I have a roof rack, skid plate, AWD, and those truck tires. Can all of this collective drag down my MPG from 27 to about 20 MPG or do I need to take this to the dealer to have them check over everything to see if there is a problem? I am sure most of you have thoughts or opinions but I would really appreciate folks who have facts about things that drag down the MPG this significantly.
 

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2014 Sport
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Off road tires are typically heavy (unsprung rotational weight can have a large impact!) and have much higher rolling resistance than the stock tires. Depending on the tire they can have a very large impact on fuel mileage. If they are a "taller" tire than stock they will also have a larger rolling diameter which throws off the speedo / odo and will make mileage calculations inaccurate (worse mileage than actual)

It sounds like your T was a 2wd Ridge? Now your E is AWD. This would definitely have an impact (probably 1-2 highway mpg) Roof rack and skid plates could also hit you for another 1mpg highway or so.

Also keep in mind that most GenII owners report that the onboard mileage computer is close to 2 mpg optimistic. However, some claim that their's is accurate. Did you ever hand calculate your mileage with the T? If you didn't then you may well not be doing an accurate comparison as the computer's accuracy may be different between the two GenIIs that you have owned.

Bottom line is that if you care about gas mileage, you should replace the tires on your E. That would probably make the greatest improvement in gas mileage.
 

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2006 Ridgeline RTS in Steel Blue
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Information on the tires, Make Model, Tire Size if not stock size. Did they also provide a lift?

Additionally the Roof Rack and Skid Plate (Especially if aftermarket) (weight)

And if your T was FWD vs E (only sold as AWD) could also make a difference.
 

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Some of these points in the blurb below have already been mentioned - I just pulled it from the Michelin site.

A few years ago I personally found that changing from a low rolling resistance tire to a non-low rolling resistance tire cost me 2-3 mpg on one of my vehicles (2002 Cadillac). That surprised me. But, until they wear out I can't justify the cost differential to change them at this point.

How to drive to reduce fuel consumption:

Maintain Proper Air Pressure
Underinflated tires are one of the biggest causes of using excess fuel in the world. The American Automobile Agency has stated that operating a vehicle with underinflated tires can result in a 25% reduction in fuel economy.

Select Low Rolling Resistance Tires
The lower the rolling resistance, the less effort from your engine, the better the gas mileage.

Some additional tips:
  1. Drive at a constant speed, avoiding rapid stops and starts.
  2. Turn off the engine when the car is at a standstill, for example in a traffic jam or at a railroad crossing, if it is safe to do so.
  3. Drive light. - Extra weight increases fuel consumption and polluting emissions. Remove unused accessories like roof racks and luggage carriers, which create aerodynamic drag.
 

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I have been saying for years that not only is black a harder color to keep clean, but that it has more drag (hence all those “wind swirls” in the paint). Ever seen a black space shuttle? No? I rest my case... :surprise:

Actually, I think the posts above are spot-on. 1-2 MPG per item, and you are about where one would expect. Bear in mind that the sweet spot (at least on my RTL-E, which is red, and therefore about 2-4% more fuel efficient than black) seems to be about 43-45 mph, depending on incline. That is where the tranny finally hits 6th gear. So to get the BEST mileage possible, I think somewhere between 45-50 mph would be best. The faster you go, the more fuel you use. Plus all the things @Carsmak listed for you.

Though with the issues your fuel system had from the beginning, I would not be surprised to find out that you are getting a slightly lower (1-2 mpg maybe?) rate if there is any other issues with water in the system. Probably wouldn’t know unless you could throw a fuel flow meter on 2-3 similar vehicles to check at idle and at RPMs while parked to get a comparison.
 

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I have a 2019 Ridgeline Sport awd. I was getting 22-23 mpg city, 25-26 mpg hwy. On one trip I even got 28 mpg. After 5,000 miles it dropped significantly. Now it's 14 mpg city, 20 mpg hwy. I have not changed my driving style. I did add an Extang Solidfold 2.0 tonneau cover recently though.

I'll plug in my Blue Driver scan tool and see if anything comes up. A buddy told me to disconnect both battery terminals for a few minutes and reconnect to reset the computer.

Please let me know if you have any insights. I'll post again if I figure it out.
 

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Remove the roof rack if you are not using it. As mentioned, the tires are definitely hurting you. Inflate the tires to the max on the sidewall. it will help with the mpg's. Does your BE have the dealer installed lift kit? A lot of dealers are doing this. it will also knock off 2 mpg..
 

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I have a 2019 Ridgeline Sport awd. I was getting 22-23 mpg city, 25-26 mpg hwy. On one trip I even got 28 mpg. After 5,000 miles it dropped significantly. Now it's 14 mpg city, 20 mpg hwy. I have not changed my driving style. I did add an Extang Solidfold 2.0 tonneau cover recently though.

I'll plug in my Blue Driver scan tool and see if anything comes up. A buddy told me to disconnect both battery terminals for a few minutes and reconnect to reset the computer.

Please let me know if you have any insights. I'll post again if I figure it out.
UPDATE: FIXED!

Blue Driver found two codes. One for communication fail with AC Unit, another with Automatic lights. Cleared codes. Notice pop-up said, "Fuel Efficiency data will be cleared. Do you wish to proceed?" Selected "Yes". It worked! MPG was much better. See pics below.
404381
404382
 

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So, if you run your AC on the truck and turn your lights on, your MPG's are going to go back down again ? Better not drive in a hot environment at night I suppose...that's nuts. Seems suspect to me. Let us know if the mileage remains up after another 5000 miles again.
 

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kwlyday...its probably too late now, but maybe you could go back to the dealer and get your 2017 back, on an even trade for your BE Ridgeline 'lemon'. I suspect these guys are correct in their analysis of your new truck, particularly with the emphasis on the off-road tires vs. road tread tires on the 2017. Big difference in rolling resistance and road contact drag. Now about the lift kit, if you have one...who cares. No big deal; the frontal surface area remains the same, its just higher off the road surface and air passes under the truck. Skid plate added weight, a minor impact alone. Not much there. Roof rack might cause a little more drag, depending on its design. Do you mean just the side rails on top of the truck that run front-to-back along the roof? If so, minor impact as well.
 

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So, if you run your AC on the truck and turn your lights on, your MPG's are going to go back down again ? Better not drive in a hot environment at night I suppose...that's nuts. Seems suspect to me. Let us know if the mileage remains up after another 5000 miles again.
No, it didn't stay that high. Currently I'm getting 17-18 city and 23 hwy. Closer to normal. I'm not sure what's up with the failed communication codes? Got another one today U0199 with the door module.
 
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