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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've had a crazy idea.

I live in an apt and have to park in a lot across the street, but there is no power supply there.

I also have nowhere to store a gas powered snow blower.

They do plow the lot but not on the side of my truck, and physically I have some dramatic limits on how long I can stand and shoveling stresses that limit exponentially. Plus when it snows here it tends to be deeper than a power shovel can accommodate.

So enter the electric snow blower, corded.

My question is this, can anyone tell me if having a power inverter installed in the trunk is possible and if it is remotely possible that they make one that could run a 13.5 amp snow blower? Not sure on the watts, I have emailed the mfctr for the specific requirements.

This is the blower I am currently looking at.

Thoughts, ideas, suggestions?

Thanks everyone!
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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If you're thinking of powering this from the accessory outlet, forget it. That's a very low power outlet reserved for charging a laptop or similar device... probably 120w max. (12 vdc x 10 amps). Does the RTL have an accessory 120v outlet? I'm not sure (our 2006 Pilot has one). But if so, that will also be a low power outlet.

I'm not an electrical guy, but my basic math tell me that 120v x 13.5 amps = 1620 watts... the wattage of the snow blower. So I'm thinking you'll need an inverter that supplies something like 2000 watts.

If that is correct, you better be prepared to shell out some dough for an inverter to handle that much power requirement.

I really think you'll be asking far too much of the RL's electrical system to power this thing.

Somebody who really knows what they're talking about should jump in here shortly and correct me if I'm wrong.

Oops. I just noticed you have an RT. I know that won't have a 120v accessory outlet. Not that it matters. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
If you're thinking of powering this from the accessory outlet, forget it. That's a very low power outlet reserved for charging a laptop or similar device... probably 120w max. (12 vdc x 10 amps). Does the RTL have an accessory 120v outlet? I'm not sure (our 2006 Pilot has one). But if so, that will also be a low power outlet.

I'm not an electrical guy, but my basic math tell me that 120v x 13.5 amps = 1620 watts... the wattage of the snow blower. So I'm thinking you'll need an inverter that supplies something like 2000 watts.

If that is correct, you better be prepared to shell out some dough for an inverter to handle that much power requirement.

I really think you'll be asking far too much of the RL's electrical system to power this thing.

Somebody who really knows what they're talking about should jump in here shortly and correct me if I'm wrong.

Oops. I just noticed you have an RT. I know that won't have a 120v accessory outlet. Not that it matters. ;)
Yup no extra outlet...

My thought was to hardwire the inverter from the battery back on separate new wiring just for the inverter, like a stereo amp. If I could get it all done for around 300'ish or so that would be cool... Maybe 400 on the outside. haven't had time to check out that link yet.

Besides it will only have to be used at most 30 minutes at a time per significant now fall...


For that amount of current, you'd do much better to go buy a small electric generator and store it in the trunk. Pull it out when you need it.

Otherwise, find someone to do it for you...
The hours I work and random times I have to cover shifts. Especially in the winter makes it hard to hire. And a generator just circles back to the gas blower problem :(

Thanks to both of ya for the responses! I appreciate it!
 

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Rather than risk killing the truck's starter battery, which is not a deep-cycle model unless you have replaced it, consider a standalone booster battery. These are sold at hardware stores and usually contain a large deep-cycle battery, AC charger and AC power supply (as well as DC cables for boosting). How much the power supply is rated for would deend on the model.

You could run the blower from this kit and charge it at your leisure from an AC power supply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Rather than risk killing the truck's starter battery, which is not a deep-cycle model unless you have replaced it, consider a standalone booster battery. These are sold at hardware stores and usually contain a large deep-cycle battery, AC charger and AC power supply (as well as DC cables for boosting). How much the power supply is rated for would deend on the model.

You could run the blower from this kit and charge it at your leisure from an AC power supply.
It does actually have a new battery, but was warranty so likely same as oem.

My thinking was that the starter battery would take the hit if the truck was running at the time?

And forgive me, just wanna make sure I'm right here... Are talking about the portable jump starter setups? I hadn't thought of those.. Wonder how long the could run the blower... Hmmm intriguing alternative. I like it.

Would love to go hardwired for any time use and no recharge BUT if that's not the best option then I will have to check this out! ;) thanks
 

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It does actually have a new battery, but was warranty so likely same as oem.
So, it 's not specifically made for deep-cycle applications. I would not routinely put a conventional starter battery through this workload. It may shorten the battery's life and reduce your truck's reliability. What if it's very cold, you run down the battery with the snowblower, and then the truck doesn't have enough power to start the truck?
My thinking was that the starter battery would take the hit if the truck was running at the time?
I would definitely not have the truck's electrical system fully enabled while running a noisy high-drain device.
And forgive me, just wanna make sure I'm right here... Are talking about the portable jump starter setups? I hadn't thought of those.. Wonder how long the could run the blower... Hmmm intriguing alternative. I like it.
The one that my buddy has is a one-piece kit that appears to be built around an automotive-sized battery. We never cracked it open to see what is inside, but I would have to guess that the capacity is in the same ballpark.

Best wishes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys!

I finally heard back from the mfctr on the specs:

120 V, 60 Hz, and 13. 5 amps. It has a No-load speed of 2450 min(-1), throwing speed of 650 lbs/min and throwing distance of 20ft/6 m

I would really like to avoid the gas requirements since the only storage is going to be the bed of the truck year round.

As to the electrical system, if it's hooked at the battery with it's own wiring, independent of the existing wire, run to the inverter...with the truck running so that basically it is getting power at the alternator level?

Seems like it would be safe in theory to me? But then I'm just going off instinct not facts... Soooo?

I'm guessing this is sounding more and more of a lost cause? Even though I found several heavy duty Inverters for trucks for constant use online? What are they using those on?
 

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That's A LOT of draw for any vehicle's electrical system. Personally, I wouldn't risk it. Honestly, you have to look at cost-to-benefit. If you purchase all this stuff, you're going to be out a minimum of $300 and likely much more. You run the risk of harming your truck's electrical system and cause more maintenance in the future.

Is it an absolute necessity that you plow this lot? The RL should be able to handle it as far as traction goes. Otherwise, there HAS to be a teenager in your complex who wouldn't mind shoveling for you twice a week for $20.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's A LOT of draw for any vehicle's electrical system. Personally, I wouldn't risk it. Honestly, you have to look at cost-to-benefit. If you purchase all this stuff, you're going to be out a minimum of $300 and likely much more. You run the risk of harming your truck's electrical system and cause more maintenance in the future.

Is it an absolute necessity that you plow this lot? The RL should be able to handle it as far as traction goes. Otherwise, there HAS to be a teenager in your complex who wouldn't mind shoveling for you twice a week for $20.
Fair point. Though I am not plowing a lot. Or even shoveling one. That is done by the landlord. However where I park is along the sidewalk which is not cleared, and is often heaped deeper due to plow walls from street clearing. So I am looking at a 2ft wide path about the length of the truck minus the engine compartment, and a walking path through the plow wall to the street.

As for teenagers, surprisingly enough there are no kids in our buildings, all Medical Students and professionals. It's one of the reasons I like living here :)

Thanks for everyone's help. I knew it was a crazy idea going in, but was hopeful in finding a way to do this small bit of clearing in less than the 45 minutes it takes me to do what should take about 10 at most.

I really do appreciate the feedback, assistance, and time offered in your responses!!
 

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Might be better investment to get a front hitch and plow attachment that you can store somewhere
 
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