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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased the M series product and had it installed professionally by the same place. Last night I had a very difficult time turning the lock lever to the open position (10 o'clock). I managed to finally turn it open after numerous attempts and more force. I don't believe that something was broken in any way, but it was VERY tight. Once opened I tested it and found that the spring latch was not working properly as it was not stopping in the interval positions. I kept turning the lock lever back and forth to trigger the latch and it finally started working. I sprayed some lube on it in case it was frozen.

Here are my questions:

should both latches 'move' or 'trigger' when the lock lever is turned? I only notice the right latch (passenger side) 'moving' when I turn the lock lever.

is the lock lever mechanism/springs (underneath the cover) prone to freezing? (I live in Toronto, Ontario Canada)

Thanks.
 

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It would be easier to diagnose the issue if you could call our tech line at 800-952-7655 as there could be a couple of contributing factors. Our staff could quickly zero in on the answer if they could ask a couple of quick questions. Regardless, I'll cover some simple solutions here.

First, for the lock-lever to open smoothly you need to pull the handle towards the tailgate. It won't move very far, but this takes the pressure off of the latches that is caused by the torsion spring always trying to pull the cover into the housing. You'll find that if you do this, the lock lever will turn effortlessly (provided it is unlocked of course).

Once unlocked, for the latches to fire-off and engage the various mid-open points, the lock lever needs to be reset. This can be done by either manualy turning it from the 10 o'clock "unlocked" position to the 7 o'clock "locked" position, or by allowing the cover to retract all of the way into the housing with enough force so that the lock lever enters the "lock-pocket" in the center of the housing lid and is automatically reset.

If you are doing these two steps correctly, then the next answer may be that one of the linkage arms that connects the lock lever mechanism to the spring loaded latches may be bent. This usually ocurs when the mechanism is either forced open or if some sort of cargo was high enough to snagg on it while the cover was being opened or closed. If this is the case, the component is easily replaced.

I hope some of this helps, however if you feel more information is necessary please call the number I gave at the beginning and we'll get you fixed-up right away. The factory is in the eastern time zone and is open from 8am to 5pm.

Best regards,

Dan Beaulaurier
National Sales Manager
Roll-N-Lock Corporation
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Dan. I went back to the place where I got the cover and installed. They confirmed that it was just frozen. I should spray it with some sort of silicone like Rust Check to keep it from freezing.

Anyways, are there any other tips to keep this from freezing? I'm surprised that the linkage arms are not insulated in any way to prevent this from happening.

Also, is there anything I can do with the limited in-bed trunk opening due to the railing of the cover?

Thanks
 

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j2k99:

Prior to assembly we coat the lock & latch components with a chemical that is meant to disburse any moisture and keep those components from freezing. However, on rare occasions, extreme conditions can still circumvent our efforts. I must caution you that if you plan to use another chemical on these components DO NOT use anything that has a silicone base as silicone will be detrimental to the vinyl surface.

The limited range of the in-bed truck lid is the result of the geometry necessary to provide an integrated tailgate lock mechanism. If the rails sat up on top of the OE bedrails, the leading edge of the cover would be elevated above the tailgate and not be able to engage the tailgate lock strip. However, by lowering the unit inside the sidewalls we are able to offer this feature, consequently making the whole bed a secure storage area for items much larger than would fit in the OE trunk area.

Best regards,
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Dan.
I'm using a product called PB Blaster Penetrating Catalyst which apparently does not contain any silicone. Do you think this is adequate to use? I'm really only spraying underneath where the linkage arms are located. I sprayed the spring area and also the lever area underneath. According to their website, this spray is designed to loosen the surface tension of frozen parts and protects against further rust.

Thanks again for your input.
 

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Hi Dan.
I'm using a product called PB Blaster Penetrating Catalyst which apparently does not contain any silicone. Do you think this is adequate to use? I'm really only spraying underneath where the linkage arms are located. I sprayed the spring area and also the lever area underneath. According to their website, this spray is designed to loosen the surface tension of frozen parts and protects against further rust.

Thanks again for your input.

Has using that product solved your problem with the arms freezing?
 

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j2k99:

Prior to assembly we coat the lock & latch components with a chemical that is meant to disburse any moisture and keep those components from freezing. However, on rare occasions, extreme conditions can still circumvent our efforts. I must caution you that if you plan to use another chemical on these components DO NOT use anything that has a silicone base as silicone will be detrimental to the vinyl surface.

The limited range of the in-bed truck lid is the result of the geometry necessary to provide an integrated tailgate lock mechanism. If the rails sat up on top of the OE bedrails, the leading edge of the cover would be elevated above the tailgate and not be able to engage the tailgate lock strip. However, by lowering the unit inside the sidewalls we are able to offer this feature, consequently making the whole bed a secure storage area for items much larger than would fit in the OE trunk area.

Best regards,
Dan
What product would you suggest using on the vinyl top to keep it looking new? Thanks:act030:
 

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Actually Haartz Corporation, the manufacturer of the vinyl we use, recomends 303 Products' vinyl cleaner and vinyl protectant. Consequently we include a 3oz. bottle of each with every unit to get you started. You should be able to find a local retailer by going here... http://www.wheretobuy303.com/.

Best regards,
Dan
 

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j2k99,

How has the RNL tonneau cover held up over the years? I am from Ontario as well and have concerns about the ice & salt and how the cover is standing the test of time in the Ontario winters.

Thanks,
 

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We have recently aquired a 2007 Ridgeline with the "RNL" and it still works today as it did day 1....I purchased it from my dad.....

Honda was purchased in Florida but it round tripped Maine / NH for the first 2 1/2 years seeing fresh & salt water fishing,snow & ice,sand & wind from Floridas west coast plus all the duties a "p/u" could see....AND that cover has taken the "USE" with flying colors !!!

Only TRUE maintainence was washing the entire truck with the RNL "IN" so that the rails could be cleaned ....and 1 strap replacement ( closing the tailgate on them WILL fray these..)

This RNL still performs as expected and helped with our purchase,my wife can stop this at ANY of its "stops",open the tailgate in either direction to access the hidden area or the rear of the bed ...while standing flat on the ground!!!

My only question would be to the manufacturer, Are there any "points" to PM these during their lifespan ; Can I lube or clean any areas that will give this unit longer life ??? Will I ever have a time to open the front box for PM's or is that a completely contained unit ????
 

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Snoope:

Thanks for the account of your experiance with our product. We're glad to hear that you are enjoying it.

As for maintainence, its really pretty simple...

1. Wash the ROLL•N•LOCK® cover with soapy water (non-detergent).
After rinsing it off with clean water and allowing it to thoroughly dry,
make sure you apply the vinyl protectant provided (303) to the vinyl surface
and track runners.

2. Periodically check the housing and drain tubes for any debris,
making sure to remove anything that could cause the drains to
become blocked. Before lifting the housing lid, make sure the
cover is closed and latched to the tailgate lock-strip.

3. Periodically treat the track runners with a light application of the vinyl
protectant provided (again, 303). NEVER use any type of grease, graphite, WD-40, or other petroleum derivative.

I hope this information helps.

Best regards,
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
j2k99,

How has the RNL tonneau cover held up over the years? I am from Ontario as well and have concerns about the ice & salt and how the cover is standing the test of time in the Ontario winters.

Thanks,
sorry, i guess i'm about a year late in responding.

the rnl cover to this day still works great! i've finally started spraying a rusk check interior panel lube on the locking mechanism and hinges underneath before the winter arrives and so far it seems to open much better than without the spray. They still freeze especially when water such as rain, after a car wash, melted snow refreeze, but can manage to turn the lock much better now since the rust check spray (still need to use a little bit of muscle).

I'm approaching my 4th year now since installation of the rnl cover and i haven't had any major problems except the freezing and black screws are rusting. I always try to really clean the cover during the summer and lube/spray the tracks just to keep it smooth.

Overall, I'm very impressed and satisfied with this cover. The downfalls I do have is the loss of height space between the bed and cover and also the opening of the back trunk as it is limited due to the frame of the rnl cover; and the freezing. I guess though it's the nature of the design.

Note to the manufacturers: not sure if this will help with the freezing, but perhaps those 'link bars' underneath can be covered in any way with some sort of insulation. They are just too bare to hold up in any winters.

Thanks!
 

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Dan,

Thank you for the PM tips ..

If this mild winter stays the Ridge will probably stay "south" until mid-spring so no worries on the "salt" effect...
 
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