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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased the M series product and had it installed professionally by the same place. Last night I had a very difficult time turning the lock lever to the open position (10 o'clock). I managed to finally turn it open after numerous attempts and more force. I don't believe that something was broken in any way, but it was VERY tight. Once opened I tested it and found that the spring latch was not working properly as it was not stopping in the interval positions. I kept turning the lock lever back and forth to trigger the latch and it finally started working. I sprayed some lube on it in case it was frozen.

Here are my questions:

should both latches 'move' or 'trigger' when the lock lever is turned? I only notice the right latch (passenger side) 'moving' when I turn the lock lever.

is the lock lever mechanism/springs (underneath the cover) prone to freezing? (I live in Toronto, Ontario Canada)

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Dan. I went back to the place where I got the cover and installed. They confirmed that it was just frozen. I should spray it with some sort of silicone like Rust Check to keep it from freezing.

Anyways, are there any other tips to keep this from freezing? I'm surprised that the linkage arms are not insulated in any way to prevent this from happening.

Also, is there anything I can do with the limited in-bed trunk opening due to the railing of the cover?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Dan.
I'm using a product called PB Blaster Penetrating Catalyst which apparently does not contain any silicone. Do you think this is adequate to use? I'm really only spraying underneath where the linkage arms are located. I sprayed the spring area and also the lever area underneath. According to their website, this spray is designed to loosen the surface tension of frozen parts and protects against further rust.

Thanks again for your input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
j2k99,

How has the RNL tonneau cover held up over the years? I am from Ontario as well and have concerns about the ice & salt and how the cover is standing the test of time in the Ontario winters.

Thanks,
sorry, i guess i'm about a year late in responding.

the rnl cover to this day still works great! i've finally started spraying a rusk check interior panel lube on the locking mechanism and hinges underneath before the winter arrives and so far it seems to open much better than without the spray. They still freeze especially when water such as rain, after a car wash, melted snow refreeze, but can manage to turn the lock much better now since the rust check spray (still need to use a little bit of muscle).

I'm approaching my 4th year now since installation of the rnl cover and i haven't had any major problems except the freezing and black screws are rusting. I always try to really clean the cover during the summer and lube/spray the tracks just to keep it smooth.

Overall, I'm very impressed and satisfied with this cover. The downfalls I do have is the loss of height space between the bed and cover and also the opening of the back trunk as it is limited due to the frame of the rnl cover; and the freezing. I guess though it's the nature of the design.

Note to the manufacturers: not sure if this will help with the freezing, but perhaps those 'link bars' underneath can be covered in any way with some sort of insulation. They are just too bare to hold up in any winters.

Thanks!
 
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