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I have a friend who is an engineer for Honda R&D.. he was part of the Ridgeline project.. the AWD is actually capability of towing more than 5k but Honda only rates it as such because it's conservative and won't get anyone in trouble.. unlock the other midsize trucks claiming to be above 7k...

He did recommend that if you're towing for an extended amount of time, get yourself a transmission cooler added to the truck.
What does your friend have to say about nearly two dozen failed transmissions in 2017-2019 Ridgelines and even more with torque converter and pressure switch failures?
 

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23 transmission failures out of how many thousand Ridgelines produced? :unsure:
Please see this post:

You're assuming that all Ridgeline owners are members of this forum which currently has 55,200 members. Nearly 600,000 Ridgelines have been sold in the US and Canada since 2005. From this, we can estimate that, at most, 9.2% of Ridgeline owners are members of this forum. This doesn't account for duplicate/spam/inactive accounts or window shoppers. Based on forum statistics such as active users and registrations that I can see as an admin, I'd guess that somewhere around 5-7% of the universe of Ridgeline owners have been members here. The percentage of 2G owners is probably less because there has been a shift away from traditional forums like this towards other social media platforms since its introduction. But, let's be extremely generous and say that 5% of Ridgeline owners are members here. Suddenly, that 14/30,000 becomes 280/30,000 or 14/1,500 which brings us very close to a 1% failure rate.
With 23 transmission replacements so far (not including torque converter clutch failure, torque converter clutch judder, overheating, and other reported issues), the failure rate could be close to 1.5%. You're probably looking at hundreds of transmission failures outside this forum in vehicles that are 4.5 years old or less. That, to me, seems very concerning.
 

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I tend to compare Honda with themselves and keep going back to the fact that transmission failures were and still are very rare on the 2006-2014 Ridgeline. If the 1G has a failure rate of 0.1% and the 2G has a failure rate of 1.5% and 15x as many 6-speeds are failing than 5-speeds after the same time/mileage, then that really concerns me.

I haven't studied GM reliability and, to be honest, haven't spent much time on the Mazda forums, either, since I've not had any questions or problems.
 

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The factory ATF cooler is indeed standard on all AWD. Note that it's rather small though, like 1 loop. You can see it next to the radiator.
The 2G's ATF cooler is the same, basic, crossflow design as the 1G's and the 1G doesn't seem to have overheating problems like the 2G. ATF flows through 7 rows in the 1G and 6 rows in the 2G, but that doesn't necessarily mean heat transfer capability is less in the 2G (there are other variables such as materials of construction, fin spacing, smooth vs. finned internal paths, surface area, air flow, etc.).
 

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Your "1.5%" equates to nearly 9000 transmission problems. Do you have any data to back that up? Otherwise, I would say that you are blowing the issue way out of proportion. That's not to say that buying a new truck with a bad transmission is excusable, but human error is eminent. It's more than likely a fluke rather than a consistent issue.
It appears you're taking 1.5% of total number of Ridgelines sold since the 2006 model year (600,000) to arrive at the number of transmission failures (9,000) in the 2G which is not correct. I'm confident the failure rate for the 1G's transmission was nowhere near 1.5% based on the lack of reports. We simply didn't see ongoing reports of transmission and torque converter failures and overheating and judder in the first four years of the 1G like we're seeing in the 2G. Again, you won't find 24 reports of failed 1G transmissions on this forum even after 15 years.

I'm basing my estimate on the best data available to us which includes the number of registered users on this forum and the number of Ridgelines sold to estimate the percentage of Ridgeline owners who are members here. From this, we can estimate how many 2G owners are members. Using this information, we can proportion the number of reports of transmission failures (currently 24) to something closer to reality.

In my previous post, I estimated that around 5% of all Ridgeline owners are members of this forum (I think the actual number is significantly less - the general population doesn't visit automotive forums, but I'm being generous). There have been about 120,000 Ridgelines sold with the 6-speed transmission. If 6,000 of those owners are members here and there have been 24 transmission failures, then that's 0.4% and counting. If I'm being too generous and only 2% of Ridgeline owners are members of this forum, then that's 24 out of 2,400 failures or 1% and counting. This is why I believe the actual number of transmission failures in 2017-2019 Ridgelines is likely in the hundreds and climbing. The total number of Ridgelines sold with 6-speed transmissions is no longer increasing since it now has the 9-speed, but the number of failures keeps increasing.

I don't care what metric or creative math you use, the sad truth is that the 2G's transmission has a "much" higher failure rate after 4 years than the 1G's had after 15 years. Whether this is due to fundamental design flaws or inconsistent quality I cannot say for certain (I suspect it's the latter).
 

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Believe what you want.....I’ll say it again, that hockey puck on top of the G2 tranny is a joke/farse. Monitoring fluid temps proves it is a joke.
How do you know the 2G's external OTW heat exchanger isn't as effective as the 1G's in-tank OTW heat exchanger and that the real issue is the 2G's transmission is simply generating more heat than the OTW and OTA heat exchangers can deal with?
 

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Again, the hockey puck on top of the tranny is a joke for warming or cooling tranny fluid. If calling it an "exchanger" gives you the warm fuzzies, then believe what you want. I call it a POS that will eventually leak engine coolant and/or tranny fluid.
If that's true, you should see no difference in temperature readings after bypassing the device. I look forward to seeing the results after you've done so.
 

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The heater core is not bypassed during engine warm-up and the heater core is several times larger than the hockey puck "warmer". Engine coolant flows thru the G2 heater core the moment the engine is started and doesn't seem to affect engine warm-up.
The thermal mass of a heater core that only weighs a few pounds is far less than that of a transmission filled with two gallons of oil and is made of 250 lbs. of steel and aluminum.

Also, when the climate control will delay the ramp-up of blower speed (and thus the amount of heat removed from the engine coolant via the heater core) until the engine warms up.
 

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So again, what did the "warmer" really do after 21-22 min of the engine being at operating temp? 🤷‍♂️
Absolutely nothing. Automakers install these devices for the sole purpose of increasing complexity, cost, and the number of potential failures. This device adds absolutely no value whatsoever. :)

On a more serious note, the volume of coolant and ATF flowing through the warmer over time is minimal at idle. A much greater amount of heat can be exchanged as the flow rates of coolant and ATF increase with engine speed (around 1,500 - 3,000 RPM while driving). Also, ATF flow in the 6-speed is reduced in P, R, or N. So, there's not much heat transfer taking place at idle when the transmission is in park.
 

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They did. It was used through the 2019 model year in various models. The base engine in the F-150 is currently a 3.3L V6 which replaced a 3.5L V6 which replaced a 3.7L V6 - all variants of the Cyclone/Duratec V6.
 

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One of the SAE 2807 towing capacity tests is a start from stop pull up a 12% grade for 5 meters. The vehicle has to accomplish this task 5x within 5 mins. I’m thinking this may be the limiter for the FWD RLs. Not sure the drive wheel would get enough traction with 500# of hitch weight in this scenario. A 2WD with RWD, such as the F150, would not be prone to the same drive wheel traction issues.
The Nissan Pathfinder is rated to tow 6,000 lbs. with 600 lbs. on the hitch even with FWD and it has a CVT. :)
 
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