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Not surprising, although the dealership mechanics meter did not see any issues either
Have you asked them to reflash the ECU? I am surprised that no further assistance was provided by the dealership. Where they able to confirm how many miles you had on the vehicle according to the paperwork they gave you for the service?

I was able to look at some of the screenshots on my old laptop that had the old OBD2 software and I do not see a mileage reading. I could have been mistaken on my earlier post that the OBD2 could read mileage.
 

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The most irritating thing about the odometer issue is, they always greet you at the car and get the mileage. Since covid all service related courtesies are gone. Honestly, I am surprised I did not notice the lack of odometer readings, however sunny days can be scarce in the NW so I like to enjoy the sites including a mamma bear the other day. So when I took it back on Friday and was greeted by one of the regular service managers and asked about the odometer being disconnected, he gave me a "huh."
He got in and looked and said he had never seen that before. After the service was done and I was paying, the mechanic was standing there looking confused quite frankly, the service manager asked if he tried disconnecting the battery and he said no, it would not fix it.

today, I ran the self diagnostic test a couple of times to no avail. I pulled the cluster out and frankly did not see any issues, did resolve my backup cam issue. Was thinking about trying another mechanic but at this juncture, I don't know what flashing the ECU is, flash PCs all the time, lol.

A more pressing question is, what do I need to remove to locate the coolant bleeder, need to replace radiator tomorrow and I can not see that little valve?
 

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Re-Flashing an ECU by the dealership essentially means wiping all information on the PCM (fancy name for a vehicle ECU) and returning the operating parameters back to OEM specifications. This can be done without affecting the ODO reading. Typically, there are more than just one place where the ODO information is stored and thus tampering is very difficult and thus HDS can pull that information. Typically they do that if you have to get the gauge cluster replaced.

I would say call a different dealership and express your issue to see if there is a remedy that they can offer.
 

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Is there a bleeder valve? Our RAV4 has one, but haven鈥檛 noticed one on the Rigi. Ooops, maybe the G1 has a bleeder.馃し鈥嶁檪锔
 

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Don鈥檛 see it on our 鈥17 G2. Usually a coolant bleeder is located up high since new coolant being added to the motor fills the block 1st (bottom up) then upward to the head(s). As the coolant level rises, air escapes out the bleeder. When coolant 1st appears out of the bleeder, that鈥檚 when you snug it up (close it) and finish refilling. That鈥檚 the way it works on our V6 RAV4. Bleeder is up at the top of the heads, passenger end of the motor. A bleeder on the block won鈥檛 bleed air from the head(s).
 

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One thing I have learned over many years of draining/refilling cooling systems is 鈥測ou can not fill the cooling system too slowly鈥......the slower the refill, the better. For several heat/cool cycles and days after initial refill, you must check coolant level COLD motor. Check coolant level in both the bottle AND the radiator......COLD motor. Coolant should be at the very top of the radiator and at or a little above the MIN mark on the bottle, COLD motor.

Did I mention COLD motor when checking coolant level? LOL

Here is the coolant bleeder on a V6 RAV4. It's up high, top of motor, between the heads, easy to get at, just loosen the brass fitting 1-2 turns to open it up.
 

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@HRL383 , the bleeder valve that @2006 Black RTL is referring to is actually a drain for the block. It is on the lowest part of the block as the design allows.

however, I still have the issue of bleeding the coolant after replacing the radiator
When I changed my radiator, and the hoses, I did not bother with the coolant in the block and thus did not mess with the bleeder/drain. If you got the coolant out of the radiator, upper and lower radiator hose, you are just fine. When you change the thermostat, more coolant will gush out; again, you will be just fine. However, if you want to flush your coolant, then you may need to flush it in a creative way using only distilled water.

There are many ways to do a coolant replacement and one of the ways is below.

 

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That makes more sense to me, being on my 3rd timing belt, I am certain the block has been flushed a time or two. What is fascinating is the hoses appear to be original after 320k miles. the position of the clamps were completely inaccessible, ended up cutting both ends of the hoes just to remove, they were seared on. ATF coolant lines looked to be the same, replacing those as well. The funny part is, the engine has never even gotten hot, much less overheated. Thank you to all of you for the info, much appreciated. This makes my Roadrunner engine seem like a walk in the park
 

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@HRL383 , the bleeder valve that @2006 Black RTL is referring to is actually a drain for the block. It is on the lowest part of the block as the design allows............
I was thinking there may have been some confusion between an air bleeder and a coolant drain.
 

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@2006 Black RTL , There is a section in the Factory Service Manual for the Gauges under the Body Electrical section and ways to run a Self-Diagnostic Function. Under this section, the LCD display below the speedometer, called the Communication Line, displays codes. Doing the self diagnostics could rule out a faulty LCD screen.
 

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I ran the self diagnostics feature 3 or 4 times and I never received any error messages. The odometer / trip meter showed turned to illuminated squares vs lines. I am curious, is it possible a fuse is blown? I was looking though the manual for the 2nd time and noticed there are far more fuses than I am accustomed to seeing, then again I stopped working on cars when I started driving Honda's in 96'.
 

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If there鈥檚 only one nut on your trans cooler lines, replace it. If there are two, you are ok. Here is the style on my original denso and also on my wife鈥檚 2007 Pilot:


^^ one nut = bad design


There here鈥檚 my new denso:


^^ two nuts = good. The inside one holds the trans cooler heat exchanger in place and seals the coolant that surrounds the trans heat exchanger. The outer nut seals the trans cooler line onto the heat exchanger.


The original design, one nut for two jobs, is bad. Add a ferrous washer between two aluminum surfaces and aluminum threads, and you鈥檝e got some engineers that need a serious spanking.


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Did the Denso come with the double nut or did you put it on.
I just bought a 2013 with 105K and mine are starting to rust.
I've heard Koyo, Denso, OSC etc. Still need to know which is the best way to go.
thanks
 

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Did the Denso come with the double nut or did you put it on.
I just bought a 2013 with 105K and mine are starting to rust.
I've heard Koyo, Denso, OSC etc. Still need to know which is the best way to go.
thanks
Pretty much all aftermarket are made in China or other low cost labor location. Product quality will be hit or miss and shipping damage is a VERY common problem particularly with Amazon supplied radiators. Rather than getting hung up on which brand, you might just want to go to a local auto parts supplier like NAPA and purchase a replacement radiator. Open the box and inspect it very carefully before leaving the store. If you can have a local radiator shop you could purchase from them and have them pressure test it prior to installation. A SMOD event sucks but a single overheating episode caused by a faulty replacement radiator can easily ruin your engine. OEM radiators are made in Japan and other than the SMOD prone fittings are high quality units. . . .
BTW, we have yet to see a SMOD event on a 2009 and later Ridgeline. Age may be a factor but Honda did make some changes to the Radiator in 09 and it is a different part number. The fittings appear to be the same as on the earlier radiators.
I have yet to replace the radiator on my 14 (with 60k miles) I will do so around the 10 year mark. I haven't decided what I am going to replace it with but I may well just buy a new Japanese made OEM unit.
 

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I haven't put eyes on my 09' since 13' or so. I did do some preventive maintenance work to that area but I don't recall what I did at the time.
Mine actually looked pretty good from what I recall.
I'll revisit it this Summer and probably just do the bypass.
 
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