Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Everyone,

I'm trying to replace the rear brake pads on my 2006 Ridgeline. I'm seen the online videos and read the forums which say that the pistons in the calipers should be able to be retracted using a C clamp. I've tried that and they move in a little bit but not nearly far enough to get over the new pads. I opened up the master cylinder reservoir. I do not see anything on the pistons that would indicate that they need to be screwed back in. There is absolutely no place to attach any type of tool to turn it. Do I need to open the bleed valve on the caliper? It is possibly due to some interaction with the parking brake? The parking brake is not on, but is there something with the parking brake that prevents the piston from going all the way back in the caliper?

Thanks for the help.

Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
I have a screw type one but a C clamp should work. I never had a problem getting it pushed back in and can't imagine what you're trying to do.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
655 Posts
There is a very inexpensive tool sold by most all auto parts places that compresses the piston. That might help. If you don't have your c-clamp just right, it might not compress the piston. This tool will do everything in a even and balanced fashion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Remove or loosen Master cyl. cap. Apply even pressure to piston with C-clamp or dedicated tool. I sometimes use one of the old brake pads between the clamp and the piston to apply even pressure. Don't open the bleed valve unless you plan on bleeding that caliper. The emer. brake has nothing to do with the caliper. Just did mine at 70,000 miles. Very straightforward job.

If you still can't get the piston to retract, it is possible that there is a piece of dirt, etc. lodged in the caliper or you may just have a defective caliper. Opening the bleed valve may allow you to retract the piston but its no guarantee that that caliper won't stick and ruin the new pads. Check the old pads...is one worn more than the other? If so, I would suspect a bad caliper.

Don't forget to lube the slide pins before finishing the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Everyone,

Thanks for the advice on this. I am still not seeing what I am doing wrong. "Bad caliper" is what several people are saying, but everything was working fine before I started this job. The truck has 80k on it and these are the original pads. They are not even down to the wear pad, but close enough that I wanted to change them before they damaged the rotor.

I am going to try wiggling the piston, rotating it and moving it in and out. I am also going to try, for what it's worth, opening the bleed valve. If I am careful that should not introduce to much air in the line and I can easily bleed it.

Remanufactured caliper is $91, hoping not to have to go there.

What should I use to lub the slide pins, regular grease, white lithium or what?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
One other quick question, how important is it that I use Honda brake fluid? Is it any different that standard DOT 3 brake fluid?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
Slide pin lube needs to be high temp. They sell at the auto parts store. Clean everything really well before reassembly. I usually go through 2 cans of brake cleaner and a couple shop rags for the rear.

The owner manual will say what fluid to use. Any quality brand DOT3 should be fine.

I purchased a Vise Grip brand clamp to help with calipers. Looks like a welding clamp but has "pads" on the ends. The suggestion to use the old brake pad to help is also good. Based on the reports so far, I would go ahead and break open the bleed valve to retract the piston, but if you do this, plan to bleed the rear brakes.

We dont know the mileage on your truck but I would caution that there can be other problems that explain why the caliper piston cant be retracted. One of those is bad brakelines. This is pretty common on American cars, less so on Honda's but needs to be considered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
The owner manual will say what fluid to use. Any quality brand DOT3 should be fine.
If I recall correctly, the owner's manual says to use HONDA brake fluid - and I believe that is the general consensus here. I think the manual also says that if you have to use non-honda brake fluid at some point, it is recommended to flush the brake fluid and refill with Honda fluid.

Can anybody confirm, clarify or correct me on this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
Not another brake fluid thread... Yes, the Honda service manual says to use Honda brake fluid, but you can use regular DOT3 or even DOT4 if you want. It's not the end of the world if the bottle doesn't have a Honda logo.

The thought that everything was "working fine" up to the point of the brake job may just be your perception since the rear brakes do relatively little to stop the truck compared to the fronts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,766 Posts
^Brake fluid is brake fluid as long as it is the same dot rating(dot3 and dot4 are basically the same)


Go down to autozone or whatever and get a caliper compression tool.They are cheap. If that doesn't compress the piston, then you have a problem.

3m makes this purple high temp brake goop, it works really good. I used to use anti sieze and it would dissapear after 30-40k now on mostly everything that I do brakes on that stuff is still on and still goopy after 50+
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,315 Posts
Make sure to flush your brake fluid every 2 to 3 years also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
I have never flushed brake fluid. Never had a problem either.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,315 Posts
I have never flushed brake fluid. Never had a problem either.
Brake fluid is hygroscopic and absorbs moisture reducing it's efficiency and longer term will degrade brake parts as well.
In an emergency situation especially when brakes have to be repeatedly applied (as in descending a steep grade) the fluid can overheat possibly to the point of vaporizing resulting in severe brake fade and even failure.

If you want to save money, don't change your oil. The consequences long term are not likely to be as catastrophic to you or those riding with you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
As an update on this, I decided to try and swap out the other side pads. This part went as advertised: pulled off the caliper, cleaned it all up, pushed in the piston (very easily, now I know how it should feel), put on the new pads, lubed it all up and put it back together.

I'm going to pull the left side caliper all the way off and work on it on the bench. I know that buys me a brake bleed but I don't think I have anything to lose as I'm probably in the market for a new caliper anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
Brake fluid is hygroscopic and absorbs moisture reducing it's efficiency and longer term will degrade brake parts as well.
In an emergency situation especially when brakes have to be repeatedly applied (as in descending a steep grade) the fluid can overheat possibly to the point of vaporizing resulting in severe brake fade and even failure.

If you want to save money, don't change your oil. The consequences long term are not likely to be as catastrophic to you or those riding with you.
It's not a money thing. It's more of a sealed system that the fluid doesn't break down in. I just never touched it and never had a problem. Toyota with 189 k...128 k... Mach 1 Mustangs I raced..... Ridgeline currently with 127 k. At what point does this water interfere with things?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
OP I was waiting for someone else to chime in but I did mine on the back at 38 k and seem to remember something with the left one. I can't remember what it was (too many kids cars to work on) but it had me going to the parts store.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
OK, latest on this brake job. I opened the bleed valve and the piston went right back in without issue. I closed it and put the whole thing back together. Now when I went to bleed the brakes, nothing will come out of the bleed line. So, that sounds like a clogged line to me right? I was planning to disconnect the brake line at the caliper and start forward from there, checking which section of line is clogged.

Also in looking in my master cylinder, the fluid does not look good. It is clearly 2 different fluids, as it looks like vinegar and oil salad dressing that has been well shaken. This leads me toward a total system flush. Any other suggestions or ideas on this?

Thanks again.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,315 Posts
It's not a money thing. It's more of a sealed system that the fluid doesn't break down in. I just never touched it and never had a problem. Toyota with 189 k...128 k... Mach 1 Mustangs I raced..... Ridgeline currently with 127 k. At what point does this water interfere with things?
I am sure there are other maintenance items that if never carried out, "nothing would happen".

There are some things I would rather not wait to happen before deciding it is important. Anything related to brakes or tires are certainly two of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
That's fine. I put the best tires and oil there is and take care of plugs and engine stuff strictly. Brake fluid just never seemed to be touched by anyone and I grew up around the track and cars.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top